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posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 04:20 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Here is the definition of version.


Irrelevant. The word you first mentioned was 'adverse' and claimed it meant to 'add-a-verse'. Your revisionist history on your own ramblings gets tiresome.


you find it amusing when you are wrong ?


If I were wrong you would still be claiming that 'adverse' means to 'add-a-verse' instead of 'to turn' which you are doing now. You constantly try to pass off what you just learned as soemthing that you already knew.

The literal translation of 'adverse' is 'to turn', not, 'to add-a-verse/version'.




Latin versus, past participle of vertere, to turn;


All which I explained earlier. You never seem to give credit on these points either. I must have spent hours teaching you Latin and I never even get a 'thank you'. Maybe if you listened we could actually get somewhere with this.

The literal translation of 'adverse' is 'to turn', not, 'to add-a-verse/version'.


As I was saying "ADONIS" "ADVERSARY"


I will let Codyoutlaw continue to educate you in religion and mythology since he seems to have a very good grasp on the subject and does not appear to be inventing things as he goes along (unlike someone).




posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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Irrelevant. The word you first mentioned was 'adverse' and claimed it meant to 'add-a-verse'. Your revisionist history on your own ramblings gets tiresome.

It is what it is, add a version, an addon. It's what an addon is, you add another version on top of the other.
Adversary is form from ad-verse.



www.merriam-webster.com...
ad·verse
adj ad-ˈvərs, ˈad-ˌ






If I were wrong you would still be claiming that 'adverse' means to 'add-a-verse' instead of 'to turn' which you are doing now. You constantly try to pass off what you just learned as soemthing that you already knew.

I don't see how I'm, wrong, ad verse add another version, I don't see where I'm wrong.


ad·verse




The literal translation of 'adverse' is 'to turn', not, 'to add-a-verse/version'.

To turn is version, it's what it means.


The literal translation of 'adverse' is 'to turn', not, 'to add-a-verse/version'.

To turn is version, to add on, by spining clockwise you add on.



[French, from Old French, act of turning, from Medieval Latin versi, versin-, from Latin versus, past participle of vertere, to turn; see wer-2 in Indo-European roots.]


Act of turning is define from vertere, the definition of version.

This would be the perfect example, Satan adds another version be chainging the story, it's what satan does best.
Satan distorts the truth watch this "BY TURNING" everything upside down.

By adding another version
There for Satan is the Adversary. Still not clear ?
edit on 7-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 05:10 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
It is what it is, add a version, an addon. It's what an addon is, you add another version on top of the other.
Adversary is form from ad-verse.


'Adverse' means 'to turn' in Latin, 'ad-' is 'to', 'verto' is 'turn', 'ad+verto'='to turn', nothing about addition is implied in the Latin. The word 'verse' did not even exist until the Middle Ages, stop inventing things.




www.merriam-webster.com...
ad·verse
adj ad-ˈvərs, ˈad-ˌ


Nothing about addition there either.


I don't see how I'm, wrong, ad verse add another version, I don't see where I'm wrong.


You do not see how you are wrong because you do not understand Latin. This is the same problem you encounter over and over. You disassemble English words and think they make sense but their Latin predecessors are not even close to what you claim. Then you start hauling out French, Spanish, etc. and try to make a connection. There is no addition implied with the word 'adverse'.


To turn is version, it's what it means.


The word 'adverse' has nothing to do with 'versions'. You have already read the definition and the etymology and it is very clear on what the Latin and Proto Indo European base words mean.


To turn is version, to add on, by spining clockwise you add on.


There is no implication of addition in the word 'adverse' or 'adversary' as you initially stated. None. Zero. Neither one means, 'to add-a-verse/version'. 'Adversary' literally means 'turn towards one', not 'add-a-version'. 'Ad-' in Latin does not even imply addition, which is where your problem stemmed from with your ridiculous computer 'add-on' analogy, it means 'to'.




[French, from Old French, act of turning, from Medieval Latin versi, versin-, from Latin versus, past participle of vertere, to turn; see wer-2 in Indo-European roots.]


Act of turning is define from vertere, the definition of version.


I am glad you keep quoting French which came AFTER Latin by nearly two thousand years. It always helps when you make my points for me.



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 05:13 PM
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'Adverse' means 'to turn' in Latin, 'ad-' is 'to', 'verto' is 'turn', 'ad+verto'='to turn', nothing about addition is implied in the Latin. The word 'verse' did not even exist until the Middle Ages, stop inventing things.

The word is composed of add and version"to turn" it's where the word version comes from.
Definition of version.


[French, from Old French, act of turning, from Medieval Latin versi, versin-, from Latin versus, past participle of vertere, to turn; see wer-2 in Indo-European roots.]


The Latin word for version comes from vertere "to turn" meaning it's what version means "to turn"




dictionary.reference.com...
Old English vers, from Latin versus a furrow, literally: a turning (of the plough), from vertere to turn]


Vertere = Version, To turn, it's what a version is.

It's what it means in English as we as in Latin. From vertere, you got latin word for version ="versio" English Version. Version= to turn.

There for the name adversary, "TO TURN" everything upside down "another version of the story" to add on"ADON"
edit on 7-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 05:52 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
The word is composed of add and version"to turn" it's where the word version comes from.
Definition of version.


[French, from Old French, act of turning, from Medieval Latin versi, versin-, from Latin versus, past participle of vertere, to turn; see wer-2 in Indo-European roots.]


Wrong. 'Adversary' (or 'adverse') is NOT composed of the word 'add'. This is the root of your problem and underscores the persistent fact that you have no understanding of Latin. The word 'ad-' in Latin means 'to' and has nothing to do with the word 'add' which implies addition in English. The Latin word for 'addition' is 'addere' (derived from 'addo') which literally means 'to join/place upon'.

See how that works? 'Ad-' (to) plus 'dere/do' (give) equals 'addere'.


The Latin word for version comes from vertere "to turn" meaning it's what version means "to turn"


The Latin word for 'version'? Really? Tell me, what is the Latin word for 'version'? I think you are going to be unpleasantly surprised again.


Vertere = Version, To turn, it's what a version is.


Considering you do not even know the Latin word(s) for 'version' you are seriously mistaken.


edit on 7-7-2011 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer.



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 06:13 PM
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Wrong. 'Adversary' (or 'adverse') is NOT composed of the word 'add'. This is the root of your problem and underscores the persistent fact that you have no understanding of Latin. The word 'ad-' in Latin means 'to' and has nothing to do with the word 'add' which implies addition in English. The Latin word for 'addition' is 'addere' (derived from 'addo') which literally means 'to join/place upon'.


It is composed of that, it means to, toward, to add.


See how that works? 'Ad-' (to) plus 'dere/do' (give) equals 'addere'.




www.yourdictionary.com...
add (ad)
Origin: ME adden < L addere, to add < ad-, to + dare, to give





Considering you do not even know the Latin word(s) for 'version' you are seriously mistaken.




www.etymonline.com...
version Look up version at Dictionary.com
1580s, "a translation," from M.Fr. version, from M.L. versionem (nom. versio) "a turning," from pp. stem of L. vertere "to turn" (see versus). Also with a M.E. sense of "destruction;" the meaning "particular form of a description" is first attested 1788.



You just don't like admiting you are wrong.



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 06:24 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
It is composed of that, it means to, toward, to add.


"ad-' and 'add' are two different words and only one of them means something in Latin and it is not 'add'. Try again. 'Ad-' only means 'to' it has nothing to do with addition, stop making things up.




www.yourdictionary.com...
add (ad)
Origin: ME adden < L addere, to add < ad-, to + dare, to give


I already explained this to you.



www.etymonline.com...
version Look up version at Dictionary.com
1580s, "a translation," from M.Fr. version, from M.L. versionem (nom. versio) "a turning," from pp. stem of L. vertere "to turn" (see versus). Also with a M.E. sense of "destruction;" the meaning "particular form of a description" is first attested 1788.


Wow. Do you not even know how to read this? 'M.Fr.' is 'Middle French'. They are explaining where the English word was derived from. Not what the defintion of 'version' is in Latin. Why do you not try typing 'version' into a Latin to English translator and see what comes up? Hint: nothing.

If you actually understood and spoke Latin you would have known this by now but you keep running around in circles.


You just don't like admiting you are wrong.


I am certainly not wrong about your lack of Latin understanding. You prove it over, and over, and over, and over and over, and over, ad infinitum. So sad.



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 06:30 PM
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"ad-' and 'add' are two different words and only one of them means something in Latin and it is not 'add'. Try again. 'Ad-' only means 'to' it has nothing to do with addition, stop making things up.

I am not making things up, it is the same thing, to place an ad in the news paper, is to add to the news paper something. AD=ADD

Here let the dictionary speak.


dictionary.reference.com...
Origin:
1325–75; Middle English adden < Latin addere, equivalent to ad- ad- + -dere to put (combining form; see do1 )


Latin addere, equivalent to ad



I am certainly not wrong about your lack of Latin understanding. You prove it over, and over, and over, and over and over, and over, ad infinitum. So sad.

You are wrong, just don't like admiting it.

Definition for version.


[French, from Old French, act of turning, from Medieval Latin versi, versin-, from Latin versus, past participle of vertere, to turn; see wer-2 in Indo-European roots.]
edit on 7-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 06:42 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78


"ad-' and 'add' are two different words and only one of them means something in Latin and it is not 'add'. Try again. 'Ad-' only means 'to' it has nothing to do with addition, stop making things up.

I am not making things up, it is the same thing, to place an ad in the news paper, is to add to the news paper something. AD=ADD


Wow, you are absurd. Once again, 'ad-' (



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 06:43 PM
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"ad-' and 'add' are two different words and only one of them means something in Latin and it is not 'add'. Try again. 'Ad-' only means 'to' it has nothing to do with addition, stop making things up.


Not what the dictionary says.
dictionary.reference.com...
Origin:
1325–75; Middle English adden < Latin addere, equivalent to ad- ad- + -dere to put (combining form; see do1 )



Wow. Do you not even know how to read this? 'M.Fr.' is 'Middle French'. They are explaining where the English word was derived from. Not what the defintion of 'version' is in Latin.

The word is in latin, it shows middle french because it's where it passed thru.



Why do you not try typing 'version' into a Latin to English translator and see what comes up? Hint: nothing

That is your answer, not what the dictionary says.
Just punch in version


version
dictionary.reference.com...
1575–85; < Latin versiōn- (stem of versiō ) a turning, equivalent to vers ( us ) (past participle of vertere to turn; see verse) + -iōn- -ion





I am certainly not wrong about your lack of Latin understanding. You prove it over, and over, and over, and over and over, and over, ad infinitum. So sad.

You are just angry at your own incapacity, so you spill your anger since you can see you are wrong.

We will use the whole word.


i.m-w.com...
ADVERSARY
If you've ever had someone turn on you and become your adversary, you've inadvertently lived out the etymology of "adversary." The word is from the Latin adjective "adversarius" ("turned toward" or "antagonistic toward"), which in turn can be traced back to the verb "advertere," meaning "to turn to." "Advertere" itself derives from "ad-" and "vertere" ("turn"), and "vertere" is the source of a number of English words.


Vertere=Version.
edit on 7-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by theron dunn

Hi Theron Dunn ----

You wrote

QUOTE "Baphomet has nothing to do with masonry or the templars, it was a LIE made up by the pope's minions under the direction of Phillip LeBel so he could seize the assets of the Knights Templar... most likely, baphomet is an adulteration of Mohamet, since the KT did not worship anything called Baphoment [sic]...".

Actually no, the term BAPHOMET has nothing whatsoever to do with Muhammed (or any other spelling variation of the name e.g. Mohamet) despite what some authors (midaeaval or modern) have to say about this alleged connexion.

The Term BAPHOMET (‘wisdom’) in fact is a reverse Hebrew-Greek Gematrial ATBASH cipher for the Greek letters for SOPHIA written using Hebrew consonants and their ATBASH cipher equivalents (S-V-Ph-Y-A translated to B-Ph-V-M-T) and is often represented illustratively as a horned goat with a pentagram on the top of its forehead and with goat-hooves, as well as a double serpented cadeusus for a male organ and two female breasts (i.e. self-generating, having androgynous parts like an ithyphallic Isis statue in ancient Egyptian art) – along with an arm up (coagule) and an arm down (solve) thereby giving the mediaeval imagination the idea of a kind of evil two pronged (i.e. horned) Devil image…but obscuring the idea of it being an image representing a positive (not evil) Solar (Dec 22) Creative Fertility Deity cf: the hooved fertility nature god Pan (Gk. For ‘Nature’ or, lit. ‘The All’)

Here is the Mishphar AtBash Hebrew Letters which show how gematrically that the term BAPHOMET is not Muhammed but rather SOPHIA (Gk. Wisdom) with the consonants ATBASH ‘reversed’ i.e. going from Aleph to Tav making them 'Tav to Aleph' and also reversing their values too

'Aleph = Tav = 400
Beth = Shin = 300
Gimmel = Resh = 200
Daled = Quph = 100
He = Tsadeh = 90
Vav = Phe = 80
Tzayin = 'Qayin = 70
Chet = Samek = 60
Tet = Nun = 50
Yod = Mem = 40
Kaph = Lamed = 30
Lamed = Kaph = 20
Mem = Yod = 10
Nun = Mem = 9
Samek = Chet = 8
'Qayin = Zayin = 7
Phe = Vav = 6
Tsadeh = He = 5
Quph = Daled = 4
Resh = Gimmel = 3
Shin-Sin = Beth = 2
Tav = 'Aleph = 1

Thus: S-V-Ph-Y-A (Samek – Vav – Phe – Tod – Aleph) (=SOPHIA ‘wisdom’ or ‘understanding’)

= B-P-V-M-T (Beth – Phe – Vav – Mem – Tav) (=BAPHOMET)

Note that here the Hebrew letter Vav is (traditionally) used for the long O vowel. (it can be used for the vowel U as well..)

Here is a quote from Manly P. Hall regarding BAPHOMET (which he equates with the Bringer of the Light i.e. the sun god, i.e. LUCI-FER (lit. ‘bearer of the Lux, or Light’) , which is the same Title that used also for ‘Jesus’ in the so-called Book of Revelation, aka the Apocalypse of Yohanon the Levite (see Rev. 22:16 and 2:28) and in the anonymous Greek Epistle of 2nd ‘Peter’ 1:19)

"The Day has come when every Fellow Craftsman of Freemasonry must know and apply their Secret Wisdom. The lost Key to their grade is the total Mastery of Emotion, which places the energy of the Universe at their unlimited disposal.

Man can only expect to be entrusted with great power by proving his ability to use it constructively and selflessly. When the Mason learns that the key to the warrior on the block is the proper application of the dynamo of living power, he has learned the mystery of his CRAFT.

The seething energies of BAPHOMET are in his hands, and before he may step onward and upward, he must prove his ability to properly apply the Energy of the Light Bringer himself, even LUCIFER.

--Manly P. Hall, 33rd Degree Mason, K.T., The Lost Keys of Freemasonry or The Secret of Hiram Abiff

Clear as mud?



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 07:04 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Not what the dictionary says.
dictionary.reference.com...
Origin:
1325–75; Middle English adden < Latin addere, equivalent to ad- ad- + -dere to put (combining form; see do1 )


I am going to be polite as possible. Are you retarded? The dictionary says exactly what I have been telling you, that the Latin word for 'add' is 'addere' which is created by joining 'ad-' (to) and 'dere' or 'do' (join/attach). Notice the Middle English creation of this word is more then 1,500 years after the word 'addere' was used. Once again, 'ad-' + 'dere' equals 'addere' not 'add' + 'ere'. 'Ad-' is an adverb and can not be used in any other context in Latin.


The word is in latin, it shows middle french because it's where it passed thru.

That is your answer.


Then prove me wrong and tell me what the Latin word for 'version' may be. Here is Cassell's Latin Dictionary, the academic standard when it comes to Latin translation as it goes back into the Republican Era.

If you are correct your answer will be right there and I will admit to being in error. I have a feeling you will make some bullcrap excuse why you will not use the dictionary.

You need to stop editing your posts AFTER I reply:


"ad-" and "vertere" ("turn"), and "vertere" is the source of a number of English words.


Notice it says source of ENGLISH words. Not Latin. English. Read slowly, it prevents errors.




edit on 7-7-2011 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer.



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 07:05 PM
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Originally posted by Sigismundus
reply to post by theron dunn

Hi Theron Dunn ----


You will have to wait until you reach the Great Beyond before you get an answer from Brother Dunn.



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 07:14 PM
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Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Not what the dictionary says.
dictionary.reference.com...
Origin:
1325–75; Middle English adden < Latin addere, equivalent to ad- ad- + -dere to put (combining form; see do1 )



I am going to be polite as possible. Are you retarded? The dictionary says exactly what I have been telling you, that the Latin word for 'add' is 'addere' which is created by joining 'ad-' (to) and 'dere' or 'do' (join/attach). Notice the Middle English creation of this word is more then 1,500 years after the word 'addere' was used. Once again, 'ad-' + 'dere' equals 'addere' not 'add' + 'ere'. 'Ad-' is an adverb and can not be used in any other context in Latin.


Being rude will get you nowhere.
Now for the word:

Latin addere, equivalent to ad




Then prove me wrong and tell me what the Latin word for 'version' may be. Here is Cassell's Latin Dictionary, the academic standard when it comes to Latin translation as it goes back into the Republican Era.

I posted from the dictionary the word, I don't know what you mean.




You need to stop editing your posts AFTER I reply:


"ad-" and "vertere" ("turn"), and "vertere" is the source of a number of English words.


Notice it says source of ENGLISH words. Not Latin. English. Read slowly, it prevents errors.


LAtin addere is equivalent to ad, what don't you understand ?

Addere is from ad and not the way around.
Middle english "FROM LATIN ADDERE" That came from AD


www.merriam-webster.com...
Middle English, from Latin addere, from ad- + -dere to put


Word History.


www.word-origins.com...
Etymologically, add means simply ‘put to’. Its source is Latin addere, a compound verb formed from the prefix ad- ‘to’ and the stem -dere ‘put’


The word "ad" or add is the same thing, it's where it comes from.
edit on 7-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 07:20 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Now for the word:

Latin addere, equivalent to ad


Your opinion is not an external source that provides proof. I can not believe you do that.


I posted from the dictionary the word, I don't know what you mean.


Do you not understand English now as well? Open Cassell's Latin Dictionary and tell me what the translation for 'version' is. Very simple. We all await the answer.


LAtin addere is equivalent to ad, what don't you understand ?


No, 'addere' is equivalent to 'add'. 'Ad-' is an adverb and is not a noun. Do you know the difference?


Word History.


www.word-origins.com...
Etymologically, add means simply ‘put to’. Its source is Latin addere, a compound verb formed from the prefix ad- ‘to’ and the stem -dere ‘put’


This is saying exactly what I have been telling you. 'Ad-' (to) (adverb) plus 'dere' (put/attach) (verb) equals 'addere' (to add). It even explains that it is a verb modified by an adverb. You can not use something that proves what I have been saying to disprove me.



edit on 7-7-2011 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer.



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 07:23 PM
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Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Originally posted by pepsi78
Now for the word:

Latin addere, equivalent to ad


Your opinion is not an external source that provides proof. I can not believe you do that.

It's what the dictionary says.



Do you not understand English now as well? Open Cassell's Latin Dictionary and tell me what the translation for 'version' is. Very simple. We all await the answer.

Numeros examples have been provided for you.



No, 'addere' is equivalent to 'add'. 'Ad-' is an adverb and is not a noun. Do you know the difference?

Look to what the dictionary says.

The whole word


i.m-w.com...
ADVERSARY
If you've ever had someone turn on you and become your adversary, you've inadvertently lived out the etymology of "adversary." The word is from the Latin adjective "adversarius" ("turned toward" or "antagonistic toward"), which in turn can be traced back to the verb "advertere," meaning "to turn to." "Advertere" itself derives from "ad-" and "vertere" ("turn"), and "vertere" is the source of a number of English words.
edit on 7-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 07:26 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
It's what the dictionary says.


No, it is what you say.


Numeros examples have been provided for you.


Why are you afraid of the Latin Dictionary? Maybe because your ridiculous arguement will be instantly disproved? Look it up and tell us what the translation is.


Look to what the dictionary says.


I did. Cassell's is sitting in my library. Tell us, what does it say?

Again with the post reply edit?


Look to what the dictionary says.

The whole word


The defintion you provided does not say that 'ad-' equals 'add'. On the contrary, all it does it support what I have been telling you all along. That 'ad-' is an adverb and you still do not understand Latin.

edit on 7-7-2011 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer.



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 07:33 PM
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No, it is what you say.

Let others be the Judge of that.


Why are you afraid of the Latin Dictionary? Maybe because your ridiculous arguement will be instantly disproved? Look it up and tell us what the translation is.

I used the dictionary to show you the contrary.



Again with the post reply edit?

To correct your mistakes.




The defintion you provided does not say that 'ad-' equals 'add'. On the contrary, all it does it support what I have been telling you all along. That 'ad-' is an adverb and you still do not understand Latin.

It does, I provided to you where ad came from, you got the examples in my last posts, origin plus history of the word.


edit on 7-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 07:38 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Let others be the Judge of that.


Considering I am not the only one who has questioned your Latin I think they have.


I used the dictionary to show you the contrary.


You did not use Cassell's, what does it say?


To correct your mistakes.


The only corrections you have made are to you own repsonses.


It does, I provided to you where ad came from, you got the examples in my last post.


You do not understand (or are just ignoring) what the defintions are. 'Ad-' is an adverb, not a noun and can not mean 'add' as in addition.

If you used the proper Latin dictionary this would all have been avoided but it seems you are taking the cowardly approach.



posted on Jul, 7 2011 @ 07:44 PM
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You do not understand (or are just ignoring) what the defintions are. 'Ad-' is an adverb, not a noun and can not mean 'add' as in addition.


from L. As in Latin.

Yet another source


AD
www.etymonline.com...
prefix expressing direction toward or in ADDITION to, from L. ad "to, toward" in space or time; "with regard to, in relation to," as a prefix, sometimes merely emphatic, from PIE *ad- "to, near, at" (cognate with O.E. æt; see at). Simplified to a- before sc-, sp- and st-; modified to ac- before many consonants and then re-spelled af-, ag-, al- etc., in conformity with the following consonant (e.g. affection, aggression). In O.Fr., reduced to a- in all cases, but written forms were refashioned after Latin in 14c. in French and 15c. in English words picked up from Old French. In many cases pronunciation followed the shift.


Your statement:


can not mean 'add' as in addition.


If you were in a court of law, this would be used against you. Lucky you are not, and I am not an accuser, prosecutor, since I don't like being one.






If you used the proper Latin dictionary this would all have been avoided but it seems you are taking the cowardly approach.

I have used many valid sources
edit on 7-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)





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