The Word “Government” Means Mind Control in Latin

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posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 03:59 PM
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On ATS we are always at odds with what our governments do to us and how they abuse their powers, so I figured why not get right down to the basics.

I thought to myself what does the word Government mean? And not the English definition, but the true Latin origins.

I am not expert on Latin, but maybe some ATS experts in Latin could help me out a bit, if I am not on track here.

Now here is my take on what I think "Government" and its translation into Latin is. What I did was split the word into two and looked for the closest Latin matches “gubernare” for Govern and “mentis” for the suffix or ending –ment.

Here is where it gets really interesting.

“Gubernare” means to control
“verb
• conjugation: 1st conjugation
Definitions:
1. steer, drive, pilot, direct, manage, conduct, guide, control, govern”

www.latin-dictionary.net...

And now for the Suffix “mentis” means mind.

noun
• declension: 3rd declension
• gender: feminine
Definitions:
1. courage
2. mind
3. plan, intention, frame of mind
4. reason, intellect, judgment

www.latin-dictionary.net...

I might be reaching way out there but could the word "Government" be more blatant?
edit on 27-2-2013 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 04:14 PM
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Excellent post. This is how TPTB run things, hidden but right out in the open at the same time.

Evil bastards!



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 



Congress

1520s, from L. congressus "a meeting, hostile encounter," pp. of congredi "meet with, fight with," from com- "together" + gradi "to walk," from gradus "a step" (see grade). Sense of "meeting of delegates" is first recorded 1670s. Meaning "sexual union" is from 1580s.

www.abovetopsecret.com...



So they fight with each other whilst screwing us?

Sounds about right.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 04:21 PM
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Originally posted by Signals
Excellent post. This is how TPTB run things, hidden but right out in the open at the same time.

Evil bastards!


What's even more disturbing about the origins is that it doesn't just apply to the mind, but also to controlling courage, plans, intentions, frame of mind, reason, intellect, and judgment.

Couldn't they have pick a word that was less obvious?
edit on 27-2-2013 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 04:52 PM
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On the surface it seems interesting but in reality...does not pan out due to ment being a suffix.

mente

Suffix of government

Either way without our "minds" we are basically useless.

Also, consider the words retirement, adjustment, development, sacrament, payment, regiment etc.

edit on 27-2-2013 by Malcher because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 05:22 PM
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Ok I am game. Let's look at Retirement.

Retire means in Latin "abscedere" which means.

verb
conjugation: 3rd conjugation
voice: intransitive
Definitions:
desist
go/pass off/away
recede (coasts)
slough
withdraw, depart, retire

Then back to mente, or mentis meaning mind......so the meaning is the mind dying off.

www.latin-dictionary.net...

I may not be fluent in Latin, but I am fluent in Italian which stems from Latin and Greek.

Mente in Italian means "Mind"

Many of the European words stem from Latin and Greek.

And just because a word has a suffix, or that the suffix is ment means that is does not pan out?



Originally posted by Malcher
On the surface it seems interesting but in reality...does not pan out due to ment being a suffix.

mente

Suffix of government

Either way without our "minds" we are basically useless.

Also, consider the words retirement, adjustment, development, sacrament, payment, regiment etc.

edit on 27-2-2013 by Malcher because: (no reason given)
edit on 27-2-2013 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 05:29 PM
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I've just checked with the dictionaries.

"-ment" is NOT "mind".
It's an abbreviated version of the Latin suffix "-mentum", whiuch means a state of affairs resulting from the first part of the word.
"Contentment" is the result of being content.
"Bereavement" is the result of being bereaved.
"Embankment" is the result of being banked up.
"Fragment" is the result of being broken.

And similarly "Goverment" is the state of affairs resulting from being governed.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 05:58 PM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 


Such a misunderstanding.

If you read the documents all the power is in the hands of the people themselves. Removing "government" removes the power the people have to control their destiny. Right now we have elitists who say we cannot manage ourselves and they have infiltrated government on many levels and they create laws and amendments that help themselves and hurt "the People" whom the government was designed to protect. Some folks want less government the same way criminals want less cops. You have to know the difference between government of by and for the people and the bureaucracy and corruption, led by industry and finance, that strangles the power away from it and lessens our protections.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 05:59 PM
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reply to post by DISRAELI
 


Good deeper research. The OP needs to study more and not get excited.


However the word pans out you are still left with the snazzles in Office constantly undermining common sense and trying to sway our minds and decisions with their slippery spinning words.
edit on 27-2-2013 by Tindalos2013 because: edit edit edit



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 06:00 PM
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Here is a Latin derivatives


ment- mind
ment- chin
MEN- moon

ancienthistory.about.com...



The following are some confusing pairs or triplets of Greek and Latin roots that are used to make English words, mostly in the scientific fields, and especially Greek medical terms. The Latin form comes first and is lower case. The Greek form is all in caps. The - shows where other parts of the word are attached and the English definition(s) follow. There are sometimes Latin or Greek variant forms, which are listed before the English definition.



Originally posted by DISRAELI
I've just checked with the dictionaries.

"-ment" is NOT "mind".
It's an abbreviated version of the Latin suffix "-mentum", whiuch means a state of affairs resulting from the first part of the word.
"Contentment" is the result of being content.
"Bereavement" is the result of being bereaved.
"Embankment" is the result of being banked up.
"Fragment" is the result of being broken.

And similarly "Goverment" is the state of affairs resulting from being governed.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 06:01 PM
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Originally posted by Malcher
On the surface it seems interesting but in reality...does not pan out due to ment being a suffix.

mente

Suffix of government

Either way without our "minds" we are basically useless.

Also, consider the words retirement, adjustment, development, sacrament, payment, regiment etc.

edit on 27-2-2013 by Malcher because: (no reason given)


Exactly. I had this to post then saw your post.. still posted.. ha!


government (n.)
late 14c., "act of governing or ruling;" 1550s, "system by which a thing is governed" (especially a state), from Old French governement (Modern French gouvernement), from governer (see govern). Replaced Middle English governance. Meaning "governing power" in a given place is from 1702.



govern (v.)
late 13c., from Old French governer (11c., Modern French gouverner) "govern," from Latin gubernare "to direct, rule, guide, govern" (cf. Spanish gobernar, Italian governare), originally "to steer," a nautical borrowing from Greek kybernan "to steer or pilot a ship, direct" (the root of cybernetics). The -k- to -g- sound shift is perhaps via the medium of Etruscan. Related: Governed; governing.



-ment
suffix forming nouns, originally from French and representing Latin -mentum, which was added to verb stems sometimes to represent the result or product of the action. French inserts an -e- between the verbal root and the suffix (e.g. commenc-e-ment from commenc-er; with verbs in ir, -i- is inserted instead (e.g. sent-i-ment from sentir). Used with English verb stems from 16c. (e.g. merriment, which also illustrates the habit of turning -y to -i- before this suffix).



Excellent post. This is how TPTB run things, hidden but right out in the open at the same time.

Evil bastards!


sigh.... sad how easily people are happy to be ignorant.
edit on 27-2-2013 by winofiend because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 

And would you care to explain what "fragment" and "embankment" have got to do with the mind?
Go to a standard dictionary and look up the suffix "-ment". That will tell you.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 06:07 PM
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As described above, government is a Middle English phrase borrowed from the Old French Govern, which in turn comes from the Latin Gubernare 'to steer, rule' and from Greek kubernan 'to steer'.

Oxford English dictionary is pretty handy that way.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 06:13 PM
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Originally posted by DISRAELI
reply to post by Realtruth
 

And would you care to explain what "fragment" and "embankment" have got to do with the mind?
Go to a standard dictionary and look up the suffix "-ment". That will tell you.



I am not looking at the standard dictionary, more so the word broken down, origins, and it's meanings separately. It doesn't have to be a prefix or suffix, just the word itself broken down and analyzed.

Whether it means Mind Control is debatable.

Ment by itself means Mind.

How about the word Mental? It has Ment in it.

www.merriam-webster.com...


Origin of MENTAL

Middle English, from Late Latin mentalis, from Latin ment-, mens mind — more at mind


Are you fluent in any other languages?

edit on 27-2-2013 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 06:20 PM
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Originally posted by Realtruth
I am not looking at the standard dictionary, more so the word broken down, origins, and it's meanings separately.

The reason I said "go to a dictionary" is that a good dictionary will give you what you're looking for- the word broken down, origins, and separate meanings of the different parts.
But it will do so accurately, by tracing the historical roots of the word, the way it's been used at different points in time.

If you look in your dictionary, it will tell you the origin of the word "government".
It will also tell you the meaning of the suffix "-ment".
Or just look at the quotes provided by Winofiend in posts above.
You don't need to make these wild, amateur guesses.

And let me repeat the point you're evading; the existence of words like "fragment" and "embankment" shows that "-ment" does NOT mean "something to do with the mind" every time it is used.

To answer your question, I have some familiarity with French, Latin, and New Testament Greek.
Use of a dictionary will help you in your understanding of English.
edit on 27-2-2013 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 06:30 PM
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Originally posted by DISRAELI

You don't need to make these wild, amateur guesses.


I can assure you that I am not making wild amateur guesses, but basing my assumptions on Latin, as per the title of the thread, and in the OP.

btw I didn't see any links to your sources which is against ATS T&C and denotes plagiarism. Here is a suggestion link your sources.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 06:35 PM
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reply to post by DISRAELI
 


Oh wait!

Someone has already done this work for me in "wiktionary.org"


This is the etymology which I entered in this edit (and which was later reverted):
From Latinised Greek gubernatio "management, government", from Ancient Greek κυβερνισμός, κυβέρνησις (kybernismos, kybernesis) "steering, pilotage, guiding", from κυβερνάω (kybernao) "to steer, to drive, to guide, to act as a pilot" + Latin mente "mind", i.e. mind control
__meco 19:24, 13 July 2009 (UTC)


en.wiktionary.org...:government
edit on 27-2-2013 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 06:35 PM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 



btw I didn't see any links to your sources which is against ATS T&C and denotes plagiarism. Here is a suggestion link your sources.
He said your friendly neighborhood dictionary. Surely you can look up words in a dictionary can't you, either online or in a book?

Like this:

-ment
a suffix of nouns, often concrete, denoting an action or resulting state ( abridgment; refreshment ),
a product ( fragment ), or means ( ornament ).
Origin: < French < Latin -mentum, suffix forming nouns, usually from verbs
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2013.
Cite This Source |
Link To -ment Collins World English Dictionary -ment — suffix forming nouns
1. indicating state, condition, or quality: enjoyment
2. indicating the result or product of an action: embankment
3. indicating process or action: management [from French, from Latin -mentum ]

dictionary.reference.com...

You said


The Word “Government” Means Mind Control in Latin
but I see no evidence the word even existed until about 500 years ago when Latin was "dead".
edit on 2/27/2013 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 



wordinfo.info...:abolishment

That explains the context in which -ment is being used.

You are simply making up words to suit yourself.

The origin of the word mind.

Old English gemynd 'memory, thought', of Germanic origin, from an Indo-European root meaning 'revolve in the mind, think', shared by Sanskrit manas and Latin mens 'mind'



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 06:53 PM
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Ok so at this point we have -ment not meaning mind, and with what the standard dictionary says it means the following.


Definition of -MENT

1
a : concrete result, object, or agent of a (specified) action
b : concrete means or instrument of a (specified) action

2
a : action : process
b : place of a (specified) action

3
: state or condition resulting from a (specified) action


www.merriam-webster.com...


Are we in agreement?

edit on 27-2-2013 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)





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