The Word “Government” Means Mind Control in Latin

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posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 06:54 PM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 





Are we in agreement?

Qestion is:
Are you yet?




posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 06:57 PM
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Originally posted by Realtruth

Originally posted by DISRAELI
reply to post by Realtruth
 

And would you care to explain what "fragment" and "embankment" have got to do with the mind?
Go to a standard dictionary and look up the suffix "-ment". That will tell you.



I am not looking at the standard dictionary, more so the word broken down, origins, and it's meanings separately. It doesn't have to be a prefix or suffix, just the word itself broken down and analyzed.


In which case, you actually have to understand how the word breaks down, and what the origins of the pieces were. It's no good saying oh, look, here's a bit "MENT" and thus it must mean "mind", because there's another Latin bit that matches that. Down that road lies things like numerology.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 07:04 PM
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Originally posted by Chamberf=6
reply to post by Realtruth
 





Are we in agreement?

Qestion is:
Are you yet?


Here is the problem I have, we are pointing and looking at only one source. A dictionary Standard English.

Have you ever heard the term "Lost in Translation"?

Because when I translate Italian to English, or vice versa the meanings are many times completely different.

The problem with looking at only one source and not understanding languages and linguistics, is that it gives the approach of a horse with blinders on.

If this makes you happy we can go with just one source and call it a day.


So the word Govern means "Control" and the word suffix ment means "Actions".

Is this the conclusion now?



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 07:18 PM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 

You are trying to make a word with a suffix into a compound word, into two independent words. -Ment is not an independent word. It has no sense apart from its stem. It is merely suffix that modifies the part of speech to which its stem belongs, changing its sense from a verb to a noun. It is not the direct object of the stem. You wouldn't break "friendship" down into "amicable boat," would you? That is what you are doing to "government."



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 11:42 AM
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What if there was no govenment? If we are truly adults, why do we need some agency telling us how to live? They have brought nothing to the table, yet most misery arises form there actions. We as a species would be better of without them. Our interests are the last thing on there mind. Open contact (off-world) would break the hold over people. Thats what they fear the most. A revolution has long been in order! The government is supposed to fear the people! Not the other way around!



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 11:56 AM
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Yep that is correct.
Governing the mind.
Although now very corrupt, the illuminated leaders
have a leg up on all of us. They never stopped studying the true religion
of Astrotheology. Because as the Sun moves through the houses of its
12 Apostles it creates an emotional base that affects every living creature.
This is what astrology tries to impress on us but some PTB know this system
thoroughly. They know how you'll feel before you do. ARAB SPRING?
March,Aries, courage, revolution, war. Iraq war start date? First day of Aries
March 20th. These are not coincidences. We need to study and catch up the best we can.



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 12:01 PM
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I used to love saying this one. Thing is, it's misleading. You can also make it out to say:

courageous guide

or

steering intellect

or

driving reason


So basically your definition is biased for the reason of making it out to be an evil entity.



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 01:21 PM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 




Here is the problem I have, we are pointing and looking at only one source. A dictionary Standard English. Have you ever heard the term "Lost in Translation"? Because when I translate Italian to English, or vice versa the meanings are many times completely different.

So tell me, since you are fluent in Italian, does government mean mind control? translation.babylon.com... type in "governo"

How about in French? translation.babylon.com... type in "gouvernement "

In any language?

The origin of the word:

government (n.) late 14c., "act of governing or ruling;" 1550s, "system by which a thing is governed" (especially a state), from Old French governement (Modern French gouvernement), from governer (see govern). Replaced Middle English governance. Meaning "governing power" in a given place is from 1702.

www.etymonline.com...
edit on 2/28/2013 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 03:00 PM
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OP is right.... Very interesting find/connection!


mind in English is derived from mente in Latin... because mente in Spanish means mind. The Spanish pronunciation is: 'men tee'. Or just click on the speaker icon for the word in the link.

Mente, or actually the evolved, processed, derived, English form of the word- is used in the word 'mental'. Dictionary.com, Origin section for the word mental has:

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin mentālis, equivalent to Latin ment- (stem of mēns ) mind + -ālis -al1

Spanish uses a lot of Latin words - in their literal original form, or close(r) to the original Latin word. English not so much... English words derived from Latin- from what I see- are processed more, to where the casual observer would usually not see the derivation/connection. For a good example - if anyone knows English and Spanish, try reading the Latin words with their translations listed in this article in Wikipedia.
edit on 28/2/2013 by MarkJS because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 03:04 PM
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Originally posted by Chamberf=6
reply to post by Realtruth
 




Here is the problem I have, we are pointing and looking at only one source. A dictionary Standard English. Have you ever heard the term "Lost in Translation"? Because when I translate Italian to English, or vice versa the meanings are many times completely different.

So tell me, since you are fluent in Italian, does government mean mind control? translation.babylon.com... type in "governo"

How about in French? translation.babylon.com... type in "gouvernement "

In any language?

The origin of the word:

government (n.) late 14c., "act of governing or ruling;" 1550s, "system by which a thing is governed" (especially a state), from Old French governement (Modern French gouvernement), from governer (see govern). Replaced Middle English governance. Meaning "governing power" in a given place is from 1702.

www.etymonline.com...
edit on 2/28/2013 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)




Understanding translation, or lost in translation are hard to grasp sometime unless you actually know another language, but I will work with you on this.

Babylon translation, Google etc....are just direct translations and unless you know where to look and how to apply words then direct translation is sometimes misunderstood.

Latin is the basis for most European languages, from Latin came Italian, Spanish, French, Romanian, etc....

English is made up of many languages, so sometimes direct translations do not work well and we need to go to the base language, or source language. Many times this is Greek, and/or Latin.


The word "Control" in Italian has different meanings verb. governare. controllare

The word "Mind" in Italian is a noun. mente

Now let's look at Latin again

The word "Control" verb is guberno, gubernare, gubernavi, gubernatus

The word "Mind" noun is mentis


Before everyone gets stuck on prefix and suffix blinders, all I was trying to do was point out some interesting origins of Latin.

Does the word "Government" mean mind control? I guess you could say it's all semantics at this point.

Come up with whatever definition makes you feel comfortable.

Peace out,

RT



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 03:20 PM
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Thanks

This is what I have been trying to point out to people, but unfortunately most people in the USA are only privy to one language, thus being ignorant in where or how languages developed.

People that have multiple Latin based languages under their belt see the similarities immediately.

In the USA long ago Latin was a required course in our school system, which is actually sad because I would have loved to learn it myself.

I have a good friend that is a professor in Latin at a major University in the USA. I have an email out to him asking what his take is on this subject.

I will post the response once I get it.




Originally posted by MarkJS
OP is right.... Very interesting find/connection!


mind in English is derived from mente in Latin... because mente in Spanish means mind. The Spanish pronunciation is: 'men tee'. Or just click on the speaker icon for the word in the link.

Mente, or actually the evolved, processed, derived, English form of the word- is used in the word 'mental'. Dictionary.com, Origin section for the word 'mental' has:

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin mentālis, equivalent to Latin ment- (stem of mēns ) mind + -ālis -al1

Spanish uses a lot of Latin words - in their literal original form, or close(r) to the original Latin word. English not so much... English words derived from Latin- from what I see- are processed more, to where the casual observer would usually not see the derivation/connection. For a good example - if anyone knows English and Spanish, try reading the Latin words with their translations listed in this article in Wikipedia.



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 03:40 PM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 



Latin is the basis for most European languages, from Latin came Italian, Spanish, French, Romanian, etc.... English is made up of many languages, so sometimes direct translations do not work well and we need to go to the base language, or source language. Many times this is Greek, and/or Latin.


You may be shocked to know that I do know another language, a Romance language -- but thanks for the condescension anyway.



People that have multiple Latin based languages under their belt see the similarities immediately.

What makes you think that the Latin "mentis" was the basis of the suffix and not the Latin "-mentum"??

Not controversial enough?
edit on 2/28/2013 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 

I'm no linguist, or anywhere in the vicinity of being knowledgeable... Don't know, or ever studied Latin... Like you, wished I did though.

I just see a lot of similarities with Spanish whenever I see Latin being used. I'm sure there are Linguists out there that can give you a much more comprehensive overview than I can between different languages, including their connections- for the words 'ment' and 'mental'.

edit on 28/2/2013 by MarkJS because: Win 8 changed 'i' to 'I'... not good for italicizing. Had to change them back.
edit on 28/2/2013 by MarkJS because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 06:16 PM
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reply to post by MarkJS
 





I just see a lot of similarities with Spanish whenever I see Latin being used.

Does "absolutamente" mean "absolute mind", then?

Does "perfectamente" then mean "perfect mind"?
edit on 2/28/2013 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 08:15 PM
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Originally posted by Chamberf=6
reply to post by MarkJS
 



I just see a lot of similarities with Spanish whenever I see Latin being used.

Does "absolutamente" mean "absolute mind", then?

Does "perfectamente" then mean "perfect mind"?
edit on 2/28/2013 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)

Where I am, they use "exactamente" a lot, so I'll add that to the mix. In looking up: exactamente, absolutamente & perfectamente does not have any connection to the word "mente", according to the Spanish dictionaries.

exactamente
absolutamente
pefectamente

I cannot find a Spanish etymological dictionary, but I suspect that at one time, these words did have that meaning in common usage. It's probably still a good way to think about them, but that's just my opinion.

To get a somewhat official answer, I asked a friend who is a native Spanish speaker. He said that 'no', the words don't have anything to do with the mind.
------------------------
I say that it's probably a good way to think about them however (thanks for the insight/connection, BTW), because a lot of Spanish words that end in 'e' (not just words that end in 'o' or 'a') can be altered for masculine or feminine.

For example the Spanish word for "this": este is masculine, and esta is feminine.

Another example is the Spanish word for "avoid": evita and evite #1 evite #2. Typing in 'evite', goes right to the word evitar. A different correct variation of the word... In reading below in the definition, you will see all three used.

I want to say: you will see all three used as the same word... but this is only partly true. Because for an English-speaking person, they are the same word. But for a Spanish-speaking person, they are different words.. That's why they exist in variations. Like the OP said, it gets lost in the translation. But I digress.

Anyways, these three words: exactamente, absolutamente & perfectamente do not have this flexibility. They have to end with "mente". How I interpret this, is as stated above.... at one time, these words did have that meaning where they were connected to the word 'mente'.

I hope that my rambling here helps.

edit on 28/2/2013 by MarkJS because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 09:04 PM
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To toss a monkey wrench into the conversation here, the "word" government is a symbol for something else. It's dictionary definition, while debatable, is less important then why that symbol was chosen to represent the control matrix that is what we call government.

While latin this, english that, is a fun debate, those who decide which symbols are to stick, regardless of original relevance, use the symbols because they go way back into the collective consciousness and provide a visceral response from the people on the planet. There is a reason that thousands of corporate logos have some version of the Rings Of Saturn represented: Nike, Toyota, Sacuony... Many will say, "well the swoosh is because...." and to some degree the fill in the blank will be right, but..... the reason is often something far more ingrained into us. In this case, Saturn, from another density, controls the planet, aligning yourself with Saturn is both homage, and assurance, so the symbol here is chosen because of something so deep as to be unconscious at nearly all levels. In fact, most often the "excuse" for the symbol is chosen first to make it seem reasonable. So, Phil Knight chose the swoosh not in relation to Saturn at all, but via an official story of choosing from a couple of designs presented, "I don't love it," Knight told her, "but I think it will grow on me." Then, every expert will simply combat my point of Saturn with, "hey jerkoff, he just choose from a couple of designs, he didn't even like it - Saturn my ass you fool." And, I'm wrong, he's right.

Saturn, or the folks residing in a different frequency range known as Saturn, are our governors, no doubt the symbol comes from their realm and, from what I know of them and their influence, it will mean "mind control."



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 10:26 PM
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Originally posted by MarkJS
OP is right.... Very interesting find/connection!


mind in English is derived from mente in Latin...

No, it's derived from OE gemynd, which comes from Proto-Germanic *ga-mundiz. English is a Germanic language with a lot of Latinate vocabulary by way of the French. But many of the more fundamental words are still Germanic.

I can't afford (and don't have enough shelving for) an OED, so I use this:
www.etymonline.com...



posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 03:26 AM
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Originally posted by crankyoldman
In this case, Saturn, from another density, controls the planet, aligning yourself with Saturn is both homage, and assurance, so the symbol here is chosen because of something so deep as to be unconscious at nearly all levels.


Density. Here's another word being misused. It doesn't mean what you think it means. Saying something is "from another density" is a meaningless statement.



Saturn, or the folks residing in a different frequency range known as Saturn, are our governors, no doubt the symbol comes from their realm and, from what I know of them and their influence, it will mean "mind control."


Frequency of what? Here's another term that's an attribute, not a tangible. Frequency of eye blinks? Frequency of water drops?



posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 03:42 AM
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My... brain... is... melting.

You obviously want it to mean what you want it to mean. No one here can persuade you into looking outside of that obviously. That or you just don't want to be wrong, but I refuse to believe anyone on ATS ever lets EGO: DEVOURER OF INTELLECT cloud their opinions and willingness to actually learn, be it you're wrong or right.
edit on 3/1/2013 by ThePawnsTheory because: typo



posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 08:13 AM
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reply to post by MarkJS
 


In my examples and yours, -"mente" basically translates to "-ly". I was trying to show that not everything ending in some form of "ment" means "mind.





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