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The reasons why your "bugout plan" will absolutely fail!

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posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 09:57 AM
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reply to post by superman2012
 





...to live off, or for comfort? Did he need them?


It's been a while since I watched the documentary, I don't remember.

But I think he had a psychological connection to a community.

He filmed himself.


He was playing to the camera in his own way, and knew people would watch his experience.
edit on 23-2-2013 by dusty1 because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:00 AM
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reply to post by sirbadazz
 


How we would survive a radiation blast from the Sun? How would we breathe, much less grow food? What about water? Everything would not be "safe" to consume.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:00 AM
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I'll be fine, I plan on kidnapping Ray Mears I will live a very long and comfortable life I feel.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:01 AM
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Originally posted by dusty1
reply to post by superman2012
 





...to live off, or for comfort? Did he need them?


It's been a while since I watched the documentary, I don't remember.

But I think he a psychological connection to a community.

He filmed himself.


He was playing to the camera in his own way, and knew people would watch his experience.


Plus he had a plane flying supplies in.




From the beginning, an old pilot-friend flew in food and supplies on a regular basis over the years, permitting Proenneke to perfect his wilderness situation and stay in his beloved cabin year-round. Eventually his stay extended to 30 years.


www.hermitary.com...
edit on 23-2-2013 by rockymcgilicutty because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:08 AM
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Originally posted by Catalyst317

Originally posted by METACOMET
Richard Proenneke retired at age 52, moved to Twin Lakes, Alaska, built a cabin using hand tools and lived there alone for the next 30 years.

He documented his life through film, which PBS airs every now and then entitled "Alone in the Wilderness"

www.dickproenneke.com...
edit on 22-2-2013 by METACOMET because: (no reason given)


Don't forget The Hermit of Gully Lake, Willard Kitchener MacDonald who lived in a secluded hut for nearly 60 years alone in Canada.
You guys left out jimmy the buff mcgillicutty from ozark springs who survived 45 years alone in the wilds of the ozark wrestling bears and wild cat bare handed living in a small leaf made shelter..



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:15 AM
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reply to post by starfoxxx
 



But was he chased by one of these?






posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:16 AM
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While I'm sure no survivalist wishes to hear what the OP has to say, it is correct. Not so much on the nutrition aspects of the post, but on the reception city folk can expect when moving into the country folk's backwoods.

The rural areas present communities would solidify and anyone coming in from the cities would be treated as a potential enemy to the community. That will be FACT.

I already have a bug out destination with a person who lives in a rural community presently. She's already part of the community and I already have permission to bring my family should a situation demand it. I'm already welcome, are you?

But the likelihood would be that I get reactivated. I'm an honorable veteran with the Army and I have useful skills. I'm almost positive my oath to my country would demand my conscience to act. I'd be on the wounded lines taking care of the hurt and ill. Should America be so unfortunate as to fall into a civil war. I'm a healer. I'm not sure I could hide and cower. I guess the situation and climate would dictate what actions I take as my first duty is to my children. In some situations it's just better to button down and wait it out.

Everyone who needs to leave the city in times of emergency NEED to know where they are going and that they are welcome. Otherwise, you just might be surprised to find a community group of armed lookouts turning you back the way you came.

Peace,
Cirque



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:17 AM
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Interesting thread to jump back in on after a week or so away, but it's as good as any. I agree with a number of others that the OP has a very unrealistic view of things and sounds like it's viewed through what I think of as the "KOA mindset". If it wouldn't work or be viable at a KOA campground level of comfort, then it can't be survived for long.


In noting that isn't quite right, I'd point to the primitive diets man has happily and contentedly lived on for most of history. Simple things with very little variety. The Vietnamese weren't just eating rice as their staple food when cameras were around to film it and it remains a staple item for the core of many Southeast Asian people. Likewise, the people outside the cities in both South America and Africa had relatively simple diets that come by nature and not production. Survival on little is quite possible is mindset isn't destroyed in the transition, IMO.

There is the key though. Survival in what may be coming in our futures won't be decided by who has the best bug-out-bag or who went to the most courses and got the best marks for trauma care or firearms skill. It's going to come down to who can truly and effectively maintain clear survival thinking through whatever the world throws at each of us.

When/If this all starts to fall apart, I think a good % of people will fall apart as well. Some will have been among those spending a fortune on 'prepping' now. It won't have helped those people much.

Mindset in the beginning and particularly maintained long term with flexibility to fast changing circumstances we can't even guess at right now ...will be the factors to who lives and dies, in my opinion.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:40 AM
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reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


Thanks for the link!


He is more distracted by filming and Park Service relations and well-meaning visitors, noisy hunters, editors seeking a writing deal, fan mail, and friends overwhelming him with gifts of processed foods. At one point, Proenneke hardly sleeps worrying about all the "garbage" of social intrusion he has unwittingly brought upon himself with the Keith book and film showing nationally.



I love that documentary.


It looks like he had a lot of support.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by sirbadazz
[more


Truth is truth and that is the truth. Thank you
Cherokee here brother



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:51 AM
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reply to post by dusty1
 


No problem, I loved that show also. I was not trying to take anything away from the man. Just trying to disprove some of the myth.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:58 AM
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Think it all depends on what your bugging out from.
Something along the lines of financial collapse or the like is simple...if there is no new system up to replace it in short time..well, we got streams, veggie gardens, and a fairly tight knit community around here...won't be going far.

If its say, a virus, or zed apoc...that requires pretty much the same plan, but with a bit more defense to the homested (and checks for the local community for health issues).

The whole bug out thing is a bit odd. I know how to camp and fish easily enough, although outside of a long weekend recreation, I wouldn't want that to happen...but I could endure.
If someone came looking for help, it would be negotiated (sure, I can feed you and help patch you up, but I want some help once your sorted out to expand the garden or whatever your trade has helped you with).

Ops is right in the aspect that community increases your survival chances dramatically. Not just survival, but actually living. I wouldn't want to live alone in a cave for 30 years...would rather live 10 in a nice strong community of friends.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 11:02 AM
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reply to post by sirbadazz
 


Meat has no carbs



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 11:35 AM
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Although I might accuse OP of being a bit infatuated with himself and maybe not too well educated about nutrition, his basic premis is completely correct. All these people with BoB's and a 4x4 are living in fantasy land if they think they can somehow "get away." Long-term survival is not trivial and in a SHTF scenario your biggest worry is going to be your fellow man. It's not like a camping trip where everyone else stays home and pays no attention to your hobby.

Of course, this all begs the question of what "SHTF" actually means. A large meteor strike is a lot different than a supply chain disruption, which I think is the most likely scenario to happen. A supply chain disruption causing a societal breakdown is much more likely than an extinction-level event. Working on that assumption, then....

The best thing a typical city dweller can do is move to a place that is more easily defended, where the sheer mass of humanity is not packed in apartments and condos surrounded by concrete. I live on an island, for example. It's not that I'm not vulnerable, but that the place is less easily accessible, therefore it will be bypassed by roving bands of would-be warriors out scavanging. It's just not worth it when the city is such easy pickings. They'll go for the low hanging fruit. Your job is to be undersirable.

You should also plan to stay put. Can you just imagine millions of people on the move? It would be an utter catastrophe. If you stay put you know the lay of the land--and your neighbors. The idea is to survive long enough for the supply chains to be restored or until you and your neighbors can get a crop harvested.

The basic idea for bugging out is to already be bugged out.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 12:18 PM
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Originally posted by sirbadazz

heres a suggestion. instead of a friggin bugout bag, WHY ARE YOU CITIZENS OF THIS DEMOCRACY NOT STANDING UP FOR THE SURVIVAL COMMUNITY YOU HAVE ALREADY FORMED - THE UNITED STATES. \


Hate to tell ya, but this is NOT supposed to be a Democracy, this country is supposed to be a republic and there is a HUGE difference between the two, educate yourself and deny ignorance!



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 12:19 PM
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It is funny when you think about it: I can build a variety of shelters, tools, equipment, etc. I can sustain myself on a small amount of wild edibles that I can readily and regularly identify...which means passing on other edibles that I cannot identify. A wonderful amount of resources a short walk away as a matter of fact, yet I live in an apartment in a small college town. I don't have a fully packed BOB sitting by the door or in the trunk of the car. I work at a job that requires me to drive around all day and the office is 20 miles from the apartment where all the handy goodies are. At any given moment during the day, I can be upwards of 100 miles from home.

But then again, I don't feel the need to have all that stuff to get by. What do I have with me while at work? A couple pocket knives (one being an old original Leatherman) which would be useless for a Long Term Situation. I have some 550 paracord (maybe 35 feet or so), a bic lighter (that I should always consider to be nearly empty since I smoke), there is a mostly useless first aid kit in the van (plenty of band aids...maybe some alcohol pads). Oh and the obligatory 1 liter of Mt. Dew.

Some would say that the above means I would die in 3 days. Quite the contrary, the above could sustain me for 6 months in the dead of winter to be honest. The absolute first key to survival in any situation is mindset. The material components of that van is the best form of supplies I could ask for if we were magically teleported to the middle of the deep woods. The fact that I drive around all day surrounded by modern society means that there are houses full of pots and pans and all manner of objects. Yeah, there are lots of people with guns too. Hopefully they will be hitting the walmart and other stores in the mad dash for food while I drive away from the craziness.

But the best example of mindset is that some guy has been texting me the past 30 minutes about his girlfriend cheating on him. I have told him several times he has the wrong number but he is crazy desperate over losing her to some guy that drives a blue pickup truck. It would be funny if it wasn't so sad. He won't make it in a long term survival situation because he lacks the focus to hear the truth being explained to him. And instead invents things to make me the guy that is stealing her away. In reality, she is an anchor weighing him down. Community is great when it works together with a common goal. It is a nightmare when it doesn't.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 12:25 PM
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So after just two posts and the OP getting picked apart looks like the OP bailed on his own thread... Troll thread perhaps?



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 12:28 PM
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All of the stuff that the OP mentioned just sounds like business as usual in my neck of the woods. It is interesting to consider how something like that would effect our society. The guy with the sweet car and the perfect abs would not be sought after anymore by women, but the guy with survival skills who can hunt and grow food would be looking pretty attractive. I can kill and drag a deer quite a long distance, ladies. Sup.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 12:30 PM
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Originally posted by Wrabbit2000
Interesting thread to jump back in on after a week or so away, but it's as good as any. I agree with a number of others that the OP has a very unrealistic view of things and sounds like it's viewed through what I think of as the "KOA mindset". If it wouldn't work or be viable at a KOA campground level of comfort, then it can't be survived for long.



That is the perfect analogy.
If you look at the list of what they have in their bug out bags it looks more like a list of things you would take on a luxury camping trip.

A lot of small rural communities are tight knit, like a big family, and are leery of outsiders/strangers, even in the best of times.In a SHTF scenario they won`t be welcoming strangers with open arms.
Hollywood movies make it look easy to be the lone survivalist in the wilderness but this is the real world you have a better chance of winning the lottery than being the lone wolf survivalist.

a lot of people don`t realize how easy they have it and how soft they really are because they have become use to all the modern convieniences. Roughing it on a weekend camping trip doesn`t even come close to comparing what surviving in the wilderness long term is like.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 12:32 PM
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I always thought it was rather humorous to hear people talk about bugging out when the world ends. Where ya gonna go? Are ya gonna drive 3 hundred miles to a secret base camp on the side of a mountain just to get a better view of the inbound asteriod that will wipe us out? If the world really ends no amount of survival prep will make one iota of difference.





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