Massive Honeybee Die Off in Montecito, California

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posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by Hopechest
 


This is the second time I've seen this argument in the bee death threads, and its really a pointless thing to say. There also didn't used to be 600,000,000 people in North America dependent on industrial agriculture to survive.




posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 04:46 PM
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Originally posted by AshOnMyTomatoes
reply to post by Hopechest
 


This is the second time I've seen this argument in the bee death threads, and its really a pointless thing to say. There also didn't used to be 600,000,000 people in North America dependent on industrial agriculture to survive.


And bees are not the only pollinating insect either. You see this argument because its relevant.

If bees die off it won't change a thing, other insects will pick up the slack. Now if you have evidence of massive die-offs of flies and butterflies and all the other little critters then I'd say its time to start worrying.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 04:49 PM
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Originally posted by Hopechest

If bees die off it won't change a thing,


Where are you getting your information from? Fairy tales?



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 04:55 PM
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Originally posted by burntheships
reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


Very sad, and sadder day coming when people do realize,
by way of food shortages.


indeed, just as 1 read in the other thread about the reptiles dying off... There are things being taken for granted here by SOME due to extreme ignorance to EA*RTH and its MANY energized inhabitants sharing it. And if not corrected by those that CAN or at least taken more seriously, as you shared burntheships it will be a very sad day, and 1 tries to keep HOPE that the corrections are made before they HAVE TO be made. So in time shall we see..

LOVE LIGHT ETERNIA*******



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 04:57 PM
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Originally posted by burntheships

Originally posted by Hopechest

If bees die off it won't change a thing,


Where are you getting your information from? Fairy tales?


Attracting Native Pollinators: The Xerces Society Guide, Protecting North America's Bees and Butterflies. Its actually a book which some of us still use for research so feel free to buy a copy if you like and check it out.

Did you know there are over 20,000 species of bee of which 2,000 reside in North America alone. All of them pollinate as well as pretty much every other flying insect out there.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by Hopechest
 


Bees are managed pollinator and their decline can be measured. But all pollinators are dying.


A global survey of several studies demonstrated a severe decline of pollinators and provision of pollination services in a wide range of intensively managed temperate and tropical agroecosystems. Considering that global crop production worth 153 billion Euros (for Europe 22 billion Euros) relies on insect pollination, the pollinators' decline has direct impact on the stability of food production and consumer prices, and might also have serious consequences for human health.

www.sciencedaily.com...



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 05:07 PM
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Originally posted by beezzer
reply to post by Hopechest
 


Bees are managed pollinator and their decline can be measured. But all pollinators are dying.


A global survey of several studies demonstrated a severe decline of pollinators and provision of pollination services in a wide range of intensively managed temperate and tropical agroecosystems. Considering that global crop production worth 153 billion Euros (for Europe 22 billion Euros) relies on insect pollination, the pollinators' decline has direct impact on the stability of food production and consumer prices, and might also have serious consequences for human health.

www.sciencedaily.com...


And that's a very good point. If all the pollinators are dying that is certainly a reason for concern. I also understand that bees can be managed to pollinate crops and their loss would be hard to replace which would hurt crop yields.

My only argument was with the issue of plants dying off if the bees go, that simply won't happen although its obvious that humans would feel the effect from no longer having bees.

I did not mean to prove this thread as totally incorrect, only one aspect of it. I agree with you guys in general that it is a very serious issue and we should take steps to correct it. Its hard to keep farms up and running without bees doing their job.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 05:10 PM
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reply to post by Hopechest
 


So you're saying we can rely on wild insects for the pollination of America's breadbasket? When agricultural honeybees are often farmed near crop farms in order to form a controlled, symbiotic relationship?



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 05:15 PM
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Originally posted by Hopechest

Originally posted by nerbot

Originally posted by Hopechest
Why do you care if the bees die?

Its sad I guess because they are cute but not the end of the world. They are just an insect.


PLEASE READ AND DO SOME RESEARCH.

If there are no bees, not enough plants get pollinated. If plants can't reproduce there is no food. If there is no food we die. All of us.


Well that's really odd isn't it. Considering the fact that honey bees are not indigenous to North America and were not introduced until the 17th century by the British I wonder how in the world any plants got pollinated before that.

Boy there is a conspiracy you should figure out.

lol


The indifference displayed in your posts are similar to the naivety and idiocy in many others. It isn't just the honey bees that are dying. We can see the results of the environmental impact on them much easier because people raise and care for the bees to harvest their honey. Other insects are being affected as well. Maybe the honey bee isn't all that necessary in North America. But for people earning their income by harvesting honey, renting out their honeybees to farmers, it's a big hit. And it's kind of stupid and irresponsible to ignore the massive amounts of honeybees dying when it is due to our own actions. Honeybees aren't the only insects affected by Monsanto and pesticides.



After being exposed to Bt, many insect populations actually mutated to resist the biopesticide. So far at least 8 insect populations have developed resistance, with 2 populations resistant to Bt sprays and at least 6 species resistant to Bt crops as a whole. Farmers are therefore forced to use even more pesticides to combat the resistant bugs.

Read more: naturalsociety.com...



It has also been divulged that Roundup is damaging other life outside of humans, shown to decrease the population of monarch butterflies by killing the very plants that the butterflies rely on for habitat and food. A 2011 study published in the journal Insect Conservation and Diversity found that increasing usage of genetically modified Roundup Ready corn and soybeans is significantly contributing to the decline in monarch butterfly populations within North America due to the destruction of milkweed.

Read more: naturalsociety.com...


Only a fool would believe that pesticides only affect one insect.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 05:21 PM
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Originally posted by Hopechest

I did not mean to prove this thread as totally incorrect, only one aspect of it.


I am glad to hear you understand this is a serious problem, and it is growing
more dire every year. At first I thought you may just have been trawling.

However, all bees are in decline, and especially native bees. Bumblebees
are in serious decline, as well as bats, frogs, and reptiles.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 05:24 PM
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Originally posted by AshOnMyTomatoes
reply to post by Hopechest
 


So you're saying we can rely on wild insects for the pollination of America's breadbasket? When agricultural honeybees are often farmed near crop farms in order to form a controlled, symbiotic relationship?


Fear/Denial of CAUSED changes from artificial lifestyles BLOCKS the Conscious of many to not take it serious AshOnMyTomatoes.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 07:36 PM
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Originally posted by SilentKoala
I still have to wonder if Monsanto is behind this. Weren't they trying to genetically engineer a species of bee that only pollinates their crappy seedless GMO crops? It would be in their best interest to reduce the regular bee population. They are truly the most evil company in the world.


Do you have some sort of reference for saying Monsanto was trying to genetically engineer a species of bee?

Not saying it isn't true but without backup - it's useless.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by FyreByrd
 


Its true, here is a recent article on it.


Remembee, an anti-viral agent which its boosters claim will help stem the tide of Colony Collapse Disorder, a mysterious plague which has led to the disappearance of the bees in up to a third of the commercial colonies located in the U.S. during the last decade.

The root of the problem, however, may not be the virus targeted by Remembee, a chemical agent which utilizes RNA interference, a mechanism that blocks gene expression, but the herbicides and insecticides that agro-chemical giants like Monsanto, Dow and Bayer have themselves been hawking to farmers around the world.
www.huffingtonpost.com...



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 08:47 PM
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reply to post by Hopechest
 


Actualy it is the end of the world in a way, we need bees to pollinate our food supply.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 01:09 AM
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You can be sure this has something to do with Monsanto.

Monsanto is controlled by the Tik'ul'anar, an ancient alien race from a planet named Tuk'un'inimeg. They are a race hailing from the Milky Way galaxy or as they call it, Tuk'un'klim Tak'un.

Their planet is growing too small for them, and they have been searching for a suitable planet to colonize. Some time in the year 1917 as we know it on Earth, they visited united states president Woodrow Wilson and gave him an ultimatum. Ever since then, the elite of our world have been their humble servants and have been trying their best to make this world habitable for them.

Monsanto has so many ties to the world's elite, make no doubt that Monsanto is on the game with their plan. This mass honeybee die-off is too coincidental to not be one of their tests. In order for the colonization to succeed, they must first find a way to exterminate us all. To them, we are just rodents.

This is precisely what spurned the Manhattan Project in 1939. They gave our leaders the technology of nuclear warfare in hopes that it may wipe humanity out of existence. Unfortunately for them, they soon realized that it would also make the Earth uninhabitable for them too.

You may ask how I know all this, well I don't. It's just speculation on my part.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 02:56 AM
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So I watched a very long video about how telecommunications towers are responsible for this.. While it is very plausible something doesn't add up..

Okay first question is, were these bee's in a bee farm? If so were there any new towers built in the area? If not, I don't believe the towers are the culprit as of yet.

The interesting part is it is happening globaly.. So there is a bit more to it



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


well from what I heard they had the same problem in france and traced it to a pesticide
www.panna.org...



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 10:11 PM
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Originally posted by Hopechest

Originally posted by beezzer
reply to post by Hopechest
 


Bees are managed pollinator and their decline can be measured. But all pollinators are dying.


A global survey of several studies demonstrated a severe decline of pollinators and provision of pollination services in a wide range of intensively managed temperate and tropical agroecosystems. Considering that global crop production worth 153 billion Euros (for Europe 22 billion Euros) relies on insect pollination, the pollinators' decline has direct impact on the stability of food production and consumer prices, and might also have serious consequences for human health.

www.sciencedaily.com...


And that's a very good point. If all the pollinators are dying that is certainly a reason for concern. I also understand that bees can be managed to pollinate crops and their loss would be hard to replace which would hurt crop yields.

My only argument was with the issue of plants dying off if the bees go, that simply won't happen although its obvious that humans would feel the effect from no longer having bees.

I did not mean to prove this thread as totally incorrect, only one aspect of it. I agree with you guys in general that it is a very serious issue and we should take steps to correct it. Its hard to keep farms up and running without bees doing their job.


Bee awareness is a tough job, especially when people in a panic over the loss of "bees" rarely go outside enough to even notice bees (native and domestic, if they can tell the difference).

Here is a post that went largely unnoticed or understood in another bee thread. This even has a source, which people here need to see online, because they don't go outside enough:



"When you look at what's out there in the public press, the implication is that pollinators are all under threat, that there's some kind of mysterious decline across the board," says Sam Droege, a biologist at U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. "The problem is, there's really no data to show that either way."


There may be regional problems and problems for some farmers relying on domesticated honeybees (old world, not from the USA), but for most everyone here, this will most likely mean higher honey prices.
edit on 17-2-2013 by Philippines because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 10:27 PM
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reply to post by Philippines
 


And higher food prices, as the price of honeybee colonies go up, and the so does
the price of food due to crop failures, and less production of commodities.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 10:42 PM
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Originally posted by burntheships
reply to post by Philippines
 


And higher food prices, as the price of honeybee colonies go up, and the so does
the price of food due to crop failures, and less production of commodities.


Sure, if you don't grow your own food (that relies on domestic honey bees that are dead.)

I do agree that is possible, but I don't know how many large agro-producers out there rely solely on domestic honeybees for their pollination. Diversity is KEY for survival farming. It is ludicrous to plant 1 kind of crop with one kind of pollinator.

Then again, look at the farms in the USA producing corn, wheat, soy, etc. Sure a lot of them are pollinated by wind (no bees needed), but the crime is the lack of diversity in the crops, offset by chemicals to keep production going. If there were no chemicals used, those major crops could probably not be grown. (At least at the volumes they are now.)

The bees in those regions that are dying are probably not dying from direct contact with plants. They are probably dying from drinking any runoff water with those chemicals in it. Bees need a lot of water, and always live close to a water source in nature.





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