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"Terminator" arm. The most advanced prosthetic limb so far.

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posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 03:47 AM
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What about the possibilitys of transplantation? Is this still medically impossible due to reattachment of the nervous system? I only ask because micro surgery seems to be coming on leaps and bounds these days. And also anti rejection medication is also moving forward at quite some pace.
edit on 6-11-2012 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 05:54 AM
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That is the most thoroughly awesome bit of bionics I have ever seen in the real world. I think that when the charity organisations get wind of this, it will be a matter of only a couple of years before we start seeing this sort of device become more prevalent. I am truely awestruck.

That said, I think, upon having veiwed the articulations possible with todays technology, that it is about time we built us some god damned power armour using the same technological approach. Totally blown away is the only thing I can really say. Amazing.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 06:13 AM
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Originally posted by TrueBrit
That is the most thoroughly awesome bit of bionics I have ever seen in the real world. I think that when the charity organisations get wind of this, it will be a matter of only a couple of years before we start seeing this sort of device become more prevalent. I am truely awestruck.

That said, I think, upon having veiwed the articulations possible with todays technology, that it is about time we built us some god damned power armour using the same technological approach. Totally blown away is the only thing I can really say. Amazing.


I hope you are right about the charity organisations picking up on these devices but lets face it us first world countrys cant even afford to house and feed our war veterans and disabled properly!

Whats the chance that disabled people get given on of these babys with a £25,000-£30,000 price tag?

I can see it now Mortgages on prosthetic limbs!
edit on 6-11-2012 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 06:30 AM
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reply to post by andy06shake
 


I hear you, but the same economic difficulties faced by people who would benefit from these limbs now, used to face those who required powered wheelchairs, voice replicator software and hardware (think Hawking) and modifications to thier homes to enable them to enjoy thier living space to some degree. People face this kind of difficulty all the time in fact.

These things never come up cheap, but hopefully governments and charities will be able to understand that not only are these bionic limbs going to improve the physical lives of those who are lucky enough to get them, but they will improve the psychological circumstances under which these people are living. I reckon that it wont be too terribly long now. With the advent of the hybrid assistive limb or HAL from Japan, and the creation of these fantastic arms , the people will cry out for these things to be offered as alternatives for unpowered prosthetics on a more regular basis.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 08:02 AM
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reply to post by andy06shake
 


C your point, but I look at it as a very simple and genius way. It means that the arm can be in use very fast, with no surgery needed.
It would surely be even more efficient with a proper connection, but as said, this way is brilliant. I mean, 14 different modes and the precision it has... From simply electrical impulses via the skin... Wow!!
edit on 6-11-2012 by LiberalSceptic because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 08:04 AM
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reply to post by liejunkie01
 


It is very expensive, but so far it is groundbreaking. It needs to be produced in a bigger scale, and then hopefully the prices will/can go down. Well, all depending on the company budget visions of course.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 08:07 AM
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reply to post by TrueBrit
 


It sure is cutting edge. And as I posted above, a bigger production could hopefully do allot for the price.
Charity is a good idea. I am sure that some organizations sooner or later will get a hold of this information and start acting.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 08:11 AM
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10-15 years down the line i can see people removing their normal limbs for these because they are so much better (or will be when the tech gets more advanced)



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 09:20 AM
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Originally posted by MastaShake
10-15 years down the line i can see people removing their normal limbs for these because they are so much better (or will be when the tech gets more advanced)


Read William Shatner's Tec Wars and others in the series. I think you will like them.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 06:17 PM
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I personally think the future of limb loss will not be achieved through a pure mechanical solution, but replication of organic replacements produced from cellular printing coupled with some form of implants. I think this kind of work will eventually be recycled for a robotics focus instead.



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 03:43 AM
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Referring to the little singing robot and equipping it with these arms some sensors and advanced computing. Now, we are close to this level of technology.

Guys, imagine the perfect wife! Girls, don't feel left out, imagine the perfect husband!

It could be the most important tool possible for population control and society is becoming so individually insular that if they were available right now they would sell like hotcakes on a snowy morning. Have you ever overheard men and women complaining of the shortcomings of the opposite sex? No more. Yes you could tell your robot servant to get back in the kitchen!

My semi serious questions, how long would it take before the PC police would take issue with you giving blunt orders. How long before they would demand programming that did not work until you said please? How would religions react when we became the creators.

P



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 03:54 AM
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Yeah, it's real nice, too bad the only ones that will get it are the very rich
...would this be covered under obamacare?



posted on Nov, 10 2012 @ 11:05 AM
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You can't get them wet. It will fry the comp chips. These run off of a battery.

I have an i-limb, it is 100% better than the old myo-electric ones. I have a separate arm for surfing, it looks like a big rubber spoon, bends for popping up & has a lip on it for duck diving. Works almost as good as my real hand for paddling.



posted on Nov, 10 2012 @ 11:21 AM
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reply to post by V4SL4ND
 


Thanks for pointing that out. V4SL4ND.

Im sure it wont be long before they can isolate the electrical systems which operate these things from water ingress however.

If they were to offer you a fully intergrated bionic, perma-linked to your nervous system, and not in danger of shorting due to water damage, would you go for it?



posted on Nov, 10 2012 @ 11:26 AM
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reply to post by TrueBrit
 


If it was fully functional, & I had the ability to upgrade software, I'd do it in a heartbeat. When I had my accident, I immediately thought of Luke Skywalker's arm...I was waaay wrong.

They have come a long way in recent years, and I don't think we're far off from what you're talking about...but as already pointed out, it's very, very expensive. Mine was around $250K, I think...(Luckily I have workers comp insurance that covers it)



posted on Nov, 10 2012 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by V4SL4ND
 


Well this is precisely the problem with all the amazing advances where medicine and mechanics come together. Makes me a little angry for people who would benefit from such a thing, but have no way to pay for it. A persons ability to pay for something, should not dictate wether or not they can have it in such cases.



posted on Nov, 10 2012 @ 11:40 AM
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reply to post by MastaShake
 

10-15 years isn't enough time. I'd say more like 100 or 200. But maybe for specific people?

What about the idea of turning on genes that change parts of your body dynamically? Like turning on a gene that repairs wounds faster or a gene that makes your fingers regrow? It may not be possible and/or it may be too dangerous, but it's an idea that might be possible someday.

Or what about nano-technology that enhances natural arms/hands.

Or what about people controlling robots with their minds from a distance?

We take for granted having real arms and real hands. They're incredibly sensitive and flexible and strong. Sometimes I wonder if we have our arms and hands to thank for our success. I mean, look at a bird. How is a bird going to build a civilization? A bird doesn't have hands to work with delicate things. Or what about a fish? How does a fish build things with only their mouth and their flippers?
edit on 10-11-2012 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 10 2012 @ 11:45 AM
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actually that guy isn't missing an arm. He was faking it. His real arm is inside of there.



posted on Nov, 10 2012 @ 11:46 AM
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reply to post by TrueBrit
 


I agree 110%. It's a shame that people are still using hooks from not being able to afford anything better. Charities do provide the 1970's prosthetics, but they're so out dated it's a joke. My quality of life skyrocketed after getting my current prosthesis. Also, that simple design for surfing was invented by some guy in Hawaii in his garage. I think these big companies sometimes over complicate things, which leads to huge amounts of coin. More parts doesn't always = better.

Maybe I should write a book, "Technology of the Garage". That dude from Ancient Aliens will probably try to sue me for copyright infringement on the title, lol.





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