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The Perfect Storm

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posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 06:24 AM
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Okay here is the 5:45 ET image. Once again, I include the previous first for comparison. The eye is bigger, but it is elongating and becoming less defined. Let's hope it got so big it can't maintain itself. That doesn't lessen the pounding, water-wise, the east coast is going to take, but it at least can make us have hope it won't continue to intensify.



edit on 10-29-2012 by Valhall because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 06:24 AM
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Link 941mb

I'm hearing pressure is down to 941mb - Isn't that CAT 3 territory?
edit on 29-10-2012 by Phoenix because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-10-2012 by Phoenix because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 06:25 AM
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For those in the North Carolina/East Tennessee Mountains.

This has snow in the mountains along the state border at 30-40 inches! I have not seen that prediction. Let's hope it is wrong.


@wxbrad
Chief Meteorologist at WCNC-TV NBC Charlotte Major Weather & Tech Geek! I Blog at wxbrad.com #cltwx #ncwx #scwx


twitter.com

Like I said this is the only place I have seen this, but heads up none the less.



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 06:27 AM
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reply to post by Phoenix
 


Its to do with wind speed I thought

library.thinkquest.org...


edit on 29-10-2012 by gps777 because: I thought.



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 06:28 AM
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Originally posted by Phoenix
I'm hearing pressure is down to 941mb - Isn't that CAT 3 territory?

I heard them say that on the Weather Channel just about an hour ago. One of the planes that went in recorded 941 for pressure. It's not on their site .. but the weather forecaster said it.

As soon as this thing hits land, it will no longer be a hurricane. They are going to switch over to 'Nor'easter' and drop the 'hurricane' title. That's what they said. That's why there are no hurricane warnings up for Delaware/NewJersey/New York. Around here, everyone is just calling it FRANKENSTORM.



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 06:30 AM
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reply to post by gps777
 


Yes, but she is somewhat correct as well. The wind speeds correlate indirectly with the pressure reading. Lower the pressure, higher the windspeeds.

ww2010.atmos.uiuc.edu...

940 is a really low pressure



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 06:32 AM
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reply to post by OneisOne
 


Holy cow! Those mountain passes will be closed for awhile if that is the case. Hope the tourists in Gatlinburg get out of there, or else they will be in for an extended vacation,



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 06:33 AM
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Lowest pressure recorded in Katrina was 902 and the pressure was 920 when it landed. Just for perspective.



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 06:35 AM
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reply to post by OneisOne
 


I have family in Newland, NC area. They said it started snowing there yesterday. Raysweather.com is a pretty good source of forecasting info and calls for several feet of snow. I lived there for 7 years and think it will be at least 3 feet or better.



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 06:48 AM
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Okay, I'm not going to keep cluttering the thread with the images, but the newest image (6:15 ET) shows the eye collapsing.

www.ssd.noaa.gov...

...which is really really good.



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 06:49 AM
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Hurricane Agnes in 72' only had pressure of 977mb at its lowest reading. Agnes caused over 3 billion in damage. I personally saw much of the damage along the Sesquahanna river basin myself. I know all eyes are on coastal areas but many inland valleys and river basins will accentuate flood damage beyond whats normally seen in gulf states.

Agnes
edit on 29-10-2012 by Phoenix because: sp



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 06:50 AM
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The Bounty crew have abandoned ship. The 17 are now in two lifeboats.

Prayers their way.

www.foxnews.com...



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 06:54 AM
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reply to post by Phoenix
 


Thank you for this reminder. The same thing was true for Katrina. There were many many inland areas that were destroyed from flooding, but the population centers/coastal cities got all the press coverage and people didn't realize how far reaching the devastation really was.



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 06:58 AM
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Latest update:

www.nhc.noaa.gov...

At this time they stated 946 mb. Sustained winds of 85 mph. Tropical storm winds extending 485 miles (that's the radius...not the diameter).



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 06:59 AM
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reply to post by Valhall
 


Ok thanks,that link I posted is only showing the pressure in inchs.

Do you know what 940 mb would equate the wind speed to be approximately?

EDIT.. never mind,just saw your post.


When we get cyclones over here (and been through some big ones myself),the worrying time is when they slow down over the ocean,which allows them to build up strength,they`ll cross landfall and start to dissipate while doing their damage.

It seems a whole other ball game over there,with way different weather conditions coming into play.

I don`t believe the media is just hyping this storm up.

Be prepared people,better to be safe than sorry.


edit on 29-10-2012 by gps777 because: Edit



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 07:01 AM
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reply to post by gps777
 


No, the same is true here. The slower they go over warm waters, the more likely they intensive and gain structure.

Right now NOAA is stating 946 mb and 85 mph sustained (with gusts much higher).



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 07:06 AM
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Originally posted by Valhall
Latest update:

www.nhc.noaa.gov...

At this time they stated 946 mb. Sustained winds of 85 mph. Tropical storm winds extending 485 miles (that's the radius...not the diameter).



Reading that update she's turned bit left as forecast to north-northwest. the earlier update had due north.



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 07:13 AM
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Wilmington DE ... okay .... the storm is picking up. We've had a soaking rain for over 12 hours and now the WIND has kicked in. Rain and wind. Still have 36 hours to go before the EYE passes over. Man ... 'power please stay on ..power please stay on ... ' ....



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 07:18 AM
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Originally posted by Valhall
reply to post by gps777
 


No, the same is true here. The slower they go over warm waters, the more likely they intensive and gain structure.

Right now NOAA is stating 946 mb and 85 mph sustained (with gusts much higher).



Pretty sure the gusts are 80-85 with sustained around 30-40...according to the national weather service. Maybe you read it wrong.

Edit: whoops 35-45 sustained.
edit on 29-10-2012 by Malcher because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 29 2012 @ 07:22 AM
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reply to post by Malcher
 



Nope:

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...85 MPH...140 KM/H

www.nhc.noaa.gov...



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