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The Army Has Issued Anti-Suicide Nasal Spray To Keep Troops From Taking The

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posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 10:48 AM
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A long while back, I read some article about the best way to get nano particles (whatever they may be) into the subject was through nose spray...Very interesting indeed!!




posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 10:48 AM
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reply to post by Benevolent Heretic
 



Originally posted by Benevolent Heretic
I want them to LIVE and BE HAPPY without taking drugs.


Maybe drugs is EXACTLY what they need.

I've been working on an interesting theory that just struck me the other day when I was reading about these suicide rates.

I'll edit this post shortly and explain more fully...




posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 10:50 AM
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reply to post by Xaphan
 




I'm fairly certain that most medical grade opiates are made from a particular strain of Afghani poppies.


With Afghanistan producing 90% of the world's opium - 5,800 tonnes this year (2011) you can bet on it...



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 10:50 AM
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Originally posted by Druscilla

One must also consider the psychological climate of a soldier.

"Aww, is tough guy having feelings? Does tough guy need to go see the psychiatrist again?"

Repeated visits and consultations with medical professionals could very well be seen as a sign of weakness among peers, where at least having the nasal spray available gives a troubled soldier some anonymity from the pressures of peer opinion regarding a condition said peers may not understand and could exacerbate.

A troubled soldier could then at least have a band-aid solution without the time invasive and noticeable intrusion of frequent therapy consultations which could lose him/her status and trust among and along side peers.

Giving soldiers something to mediate the issue is better than nothing at all, though proper clinical therapy may in fact be needed, a soldier's individual reputation and feelings of self worth may depend more on the opinions of the soldiers they work closely with and along side, so, a culture of toughing it out, and walking it off will likely remain prevalent until they discharge their service and can seek proper treatment.



You've got to be kidding me. What kind of person thinks this is a good thing in any way, shape, or form. Seriously, you think our sons should be fighting a losing war, getting shot up with secret vaccines, and then nasal sprayed to keep their minds numb from the all the physical and psychological side effects of the military these days?
You can not have a soul if you think any of this is the answer to anything.



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 10:57 AM
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Originally posted by Benevolent Heretic
That is very strange, but not surprising. We, as a culture, are taught to treat the symptoms instead of treating the cause.


I hardly ever agree with anything you post but this I can get behind. Being a 24 year vet and most of that in Special Operations I have a regular monthly session with a Doctor. I actually have to drive over two hours to get there because I have to see a Doctor with the proper security clearance to discuss my "issues". Since I hate driving and the city even more that means I show up with elevated heart rate and BP. (Always want to prescribe me meds for that too but when I do not want to kill someone for being a #ty driver my BP is fine.)

She used to always want to prescribe me meds but I refused them all except ambien which is a great thing if you are having trouble sleeping. I do individual "therapy" basically we just talk. Seems to make me feel better since I can't really talk to just anyone about operational details.


Originally posted by Benevolent Heretic
Get them OUT of the hostile, foreign environment, where they're doing things that go against their personal morals and fear for their lives every moment! That's the answer, not nasal spray!


Unfortunately the only way Soldiers and their leaders can learn how to effectively wage war is through practice so on this we can disagree.

We do need to screen people better for who has the aptitude for sustained infantry combat than we do now. In SF you hardly see suicide because we are screened for the ability to deal with the "nature of combat". We also have our own Doctors who are very good at what they do. I think it’s a shame we don't screen young recruits better and provide them with the same access to care we have in Special OPs.



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 10:59 AM
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I read a lot of science fiction and Lucius Shepard's story called Salvador had these types of drugs in it. A story of soldiers taking something to relax, another to get ready for battle. Performance enhancers.
Better living through chemistry.



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 11:06 AM
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How about mandatory therapy sessions for the service members in the field, and screenings during the debriefing period upon their return home? There is no pill, nasal spray, or repellent to ward off suicide. I think talking about their problems is the best approach, and only a psychiatrist or a licensed mental therapist can read the tea leaves regarding someone that may be at risk of suicide. Easier said than done, because it is not easy for anyone to open up about skeletons in their closet or personal demons.

A lot of these active duty service members, and veterans remain introverted about their feelings and experiences in combat. It is something I have seen among both family and friends whom have served in a war zone. I don't know why it is, but that seems to be the problem. We have to get these men and women to open up, and seek help if it is needed. Release the stigma associated with psychological disorders, because there is one. No matter how much patient confidentiality a medical professional can cite to put a person at ease. It does not seem to alleviate the anxiety. I think people fear that word will get out about their condition, or that people will look down upon them over their condition.

As some have pointed out, I am glad the DOD and VA have recognized this problem. In wars of the past, this issue remained hidden. As a matter of fact, I got a letter in the mail from the VA a few months ago offering services for this particular topic. A crisis hotline with mental health professionals for veterans and their families, and even those veterans that have not enrolled in the VA healthcare program. The hard part is getting people to seek the help that is needed. However, I think the military and the VA are at least trying to get a handle on this, because the suicide rates are soaring.
edit on 19-8-2012 by Jakes51 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 11:08 AM
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I wonder if that military "nose candy" will become popular on the streets?? Perhaps it will be given to the populace in general - the Soma of a Brave New World Order.


edit on 19-8-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 11:13 AM
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Originally posted by SunnyDee

You've got to be kidding me. What kind of person thinks this is a good thing in any way, shape, or form. Seriously, you think our sons should be fighting a losing war, getting shot up with secret vaccines, and then nasal sprayed to keep their minds numb from the all the physical and psychological side effects of the military these days?
You can not have a soul if you think any of this is the answer to anything.


Tell me something:

Did these soldiers sign up of their own free will? Did someone force them to choose a combat MOS?
Weren't most of these soldiers glaringly aware of what high-profile conflicts were/are occurring on the global stage?

I'm pretty sure, a large number of soldiers have at least some idea of what they're getting into, volunteering for, and what their MOS will involve.

There are a great number of soldiers who do quite fine under the pressures and demands of hazardous duty.
Some, however, don't.
Those that don't at least now have a solution to mediate the issue until such time they take a medical discharge for being unfit for duty whereby they can get proper clinical treatment and attention.

Of course, if you like, we can let soldiers self medicate with alcohol and other more dangerous recreational substances as has been traditional.



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 11:24 AM
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reply to post by Druscilla
 

No they don't. Sure they may realize they'll be in combat and could die, but I can guarantee they did not have an understanding of the amount of poisons that would be pumped into them, the unrecognizable enemy, the lack of a clear ending, the extended stays, the thankless govt and public.....this is not WW2, we knew the enemy and the mission then. After a few years in the servces now, our soldiers are clearly demoralized and jaded, knowing they are just Pawns for the U.S. corporation.



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 11:25 AM
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Originally posted by Druscilla

Of course, if you like, we can let soldiers self medicate with alcohol and other more dangerous recreational substances as has been traditional.


I generally agree with your post. Just to keep perspective, however, I would put alcohol right up there among the more dangerous of recreational substances - regardless of its legal status.


edit on 19-8-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 11:30 AM
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Looks like the Afghans are winning the war. Instead of using guns they have demoralized the US troops so much that they have been killing themselves. Demoralization is a powerful weapon and these troops who came into the fight thinking that they were saving the USA saw the truth.
edit on 113131p://8America/ChicagoSun, 19 Aug 2012 11:37:56 -0500 by THE_PROFESSIONAL because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 11:33 AM
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reply to post by Druscilla
 



Originally posted by Druscilla
I'm pretty sure, a large number of soldiers have at least some idea of what they're getting into, volunteering for, and what their MOS will involve.


I don't think they do. They aren't aware that they'll get into a situation where taking their life is favored over living it. Yes, they have "SOME" idea, but really? They have no idea how hard it is.



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by SunnyDee
 


Some of them join for the money. If they really cared about the country they would fight the war for free but our country has been sold out and there are no jobs left. Secondly they are brainwashed by video games and the Zionist media into thinking that middle eastern people are bad. They are young and impressionable and hence this is what you get.



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 11:40 AM
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reply to post by THE_PROFESSIONAL
 


I agree completely. It has been sold to them as a good idea through all that you mentioned. Those video games should have "The Aftermath" part of the game where they have to come back home to fight for a job, fight for their marriage, and fight for their sanity.



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 11:42 AM
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reply to post by SunnyDee
 


That and the repetitive images on 911 playing on the media for years on end was the biggest propaganda and brainwashing that the youth endured all without telling why 911 happened or the background for it.



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 12:25 PM
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I suspect that this nasal spray might just include some drugs other than tranks.
The Military has experimented on its members many times with out the knowledge of the troops.
And the military doesn't have a very good record of telling the truth about much of anything and I for one have
a hard time believing any military or exmilitary members here on ATS. They are still carrying out the
propaganda they were fed while they chose to "embrace the suck"; even unconsciously; I know I did for awhile.

www.cnn.com...
edit on 19-8-2012 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 12:29 PM
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Originally posted by THE_PROFESSIONAL
Looks like the Afghans are winning the war. Instead of using guns they have demoralized the US troops so much that they have been killing themselves. Demoralization is a powerful weapon and these troops who came into the fight thinking that they were saving the USA saw the truth.
edit on 113131p://8America/ChicagoSun, 19 Aug 2012 11:37:56 -0500 by THE_PROFESSIONAL because: (no reason given)


Are the high suicide rates a symptom of something else, what else have they been giving them?



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 12:35 PM
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Originally posted by Stormdancer777

Originally posted by THE_PROFESSIONAL
Looks like the Afghans are winning the war. Instead of using guns they have demoralized the US troops so much that they have been killing themselves. Demoralization is a powerful weapon and these troops who came into the fight thinking that they were saving the USA saw the truth.
edit on 113131p://8America/ChicagoSun, 19 Aug 2012 11:37:56 -0500 by THE_PROFESSIONAL because: (no reason given)


Are the high suicide rates a symptom of something else, what else have they been giving them?


Pyridostigmine for one...

www.cnn.com...

Interesting read...

www.gulfwarvets.com...


edit on 19-8-2012 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2012 @ 12:36 PM
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(AP) WASHINGTON - Suicides among active-duty soldiers in July more than doubled from June, accelerating a trend throughout the military this year that has prompted Pentagon leaders to redouble efforts to solve a puzzling problem.

The Army, which is the only branch of the military that issues monthly press statements on suicides, said 26 active-duty soldiers killed themselves in July, compared with 12 in June. The July total was the highest for any month since the Army began reporting suicides by month in 2009, according to Lt. Col. Lisa Garcia, an Army spokeswoman.

The Marine Corps had eight suicides in July, up from six in June. The July figure was its highest monthly total of 2012 and pushed its total for the year so far to 32 — equal to the Marines' total for all of 2011. The Marines' July figure is being posted on its website but was provided first to The Associated Press.
www.cbsnews.com...
The Air Force said it had six in July, compared with two in June. The Navy had four in July but its June figure was not immediately available.


Are these figures any higher than the suicide rates for the average citizen,
and are they just using this as an excuse to use these soldiers as Guinea pigs?


Suicide is a major, preventable public health problem. In 2007, it was the tenth leading cause of death in the U.S., accounting for 34,598 deaths.1 The overall rate was 11.3 suicide deaths per 100,000 people.1 An estimated 11 attempted suicides occur per every suicide death.1

www.nimh.nih.gov...
edit on 123131p://bSunday2012 by Stormdancer777 because: (no reason given)



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