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Marketable Teenage Dissent

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posted on Aug, 17 2012 @ 01:31 AM
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I wasn't sure whether to post this here or in the "Education and Media" forum, so feel free to relocate this if it's in the wrong spot.

There's a primary reason why activism and interest in world events aren't important to teenagers and younger adults, and that's because corporations sell them rebellion in the form of music and fashion because it distracts people from noticing the important issues. The people who desire not to conform and make a difference will think they're doing so through supporting a certain artist (usually a mainstream "alternative" band such as My Chemical Romance, Green Day, Paramore, etc) because their desire for change has been transferred to something more acceptable to society.

In the past decades, most teenagers "rebelled" through attending protests or trying to become in some form of activism. Most of the popular artists at the time sang about social and political issues. Since there would a great danger to the world in most politicians and businessmen eyes if there was more social justice and less corruption, the rebellion that is marketed today glorifies dyeing one's hair black and wearing ripped skinny jeans because that's not a general threat.

Likewise, teenagers are told that this "Need to rebel" is just a phase that they will soon discard as they get older and more assimilated into society. They are told that their view of the world is incorrect because there is a reason why things are the way that they are. Wanting to change the world is just a symptom of growing up; in more extreme cases there is a word for that kind of desire in psychology text-books. A "Messiah Complex". Why? Because we're taught that this society that we live in is not perfect, but it has the most ideal conditions for this period in time, and that there is no need to change the status quo if it mostly works.

Of course, this is just a theory.

Do you think that the government and the media channel the need for change in the world into more acceptable forms of rebellion so that their power over the people is not threatened?




edit on 17-8-2012 by xKhaosXREVolutionXx because: Public Ignorance




posted on Aug, 17 2012 @ 01:42 AM
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I don't know why you felt the need to write a 3 paragraph post on how to "fit in".

It has nothing to do with marketing. Kids follow more popular kids.

It's not a mystery.



posted on Aug, 17 2012 @ 02:12 AM
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reply to post by litterbaux
 


I don't think kids follow more popular kids, they go with those who accept them, whether or not they are popular.



posted on Aug, 17 2012 @ 02:21 AM
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Originally posted by litterbaux
I don't know why you felt the need to write a 3 paragraph post on how to "fit in".

It has nothing to do with marketing. Kids follow more popular kids.

It's not a mystery.


I didn't write a three paragraphs telling people how to "Fit in", if you've actually understood what I was getting at, you would notice that I stated that a lot of potential to change this world through activism is being transferred to more "healthy" outlets of rebellion so that the problems at hand are forgotten.

Rebellion isn't based on popularity; last time I checked, the popular kids tended to beat up on anyone who thought or looked differently.



posted on Aug, 17 2012 @ 02:24 AM
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It is a shame. Growing up I and almost everyone around me bought into the "rebellion".

Thankfully, I quickly grew out of it. However I can't say the same for all of my old friends...

But we are making generalizations, of course. Some teenagers do rebel against the important issues.

But there is also the "i don't give a ****" mentality form of rebellion.

That is just disgusting. I truly hate the majority of the music industry for this reason.



posted on Aug, 17 2012 @ 02:26 AM
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reply to post by xKhaosXREVolutionXx
 


I remember being a rebellious teenager, back in the day. And the reason I wasn't interested in world events is that my body was raging with hormones and my mind was filled with newly offered freedoms... And I was interested in about three our four things - all of which violate ATS T&C so won't be mentioned.


~Heff



posted on Aug, 17 2012 @ 02:46 AM
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I don't know. I've loved politics since I was 14. It's actually the age that I started reading ATS, I used to believe in chemtrails back then...which is kind of embarrassing to admit. I think caring about what is going on in the world should come naturally. I just don't understand why people find it boring or don't care.

It has nothing to do with age though, most adults could care less as well.



posted on Aug, 17 2012 @ 12:41 PM
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reply to post by xKhaosXREVolutionXx
 


I'm not sure that government and business started trying to change it to keep power. Businesses found that marketing to disenchanted kids worked well some time around 1990. If you look back that is when the move towards irony, cynicism, and "meta" commercials became popular. Kids were told to be extreme and rebel by listening to Nirvana and Rage Against The Machine. Bungee jumping and Moto-Cross became rebellious because they were different and more "extreme" than sports that came before.

I think it started as a way to sell kids the idea that they are better than those that came before. Appeal to their need to feel accepted and understood and they will spend millions. Tell them that thy are discovering something new and their feelings make them superior and they will spend billions.




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