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Patient dying of thirst rang 999

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posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 04:18 AM
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Hi all
done a search cant see if this has been posted

Patient dying of thirst rang 999

This happend in 2009 (i cant remember this one)
I cant believe in this day and age these mistakes keep happening
the nhs system is scary and i would dread being ill


A young patient who died of dehydration at a leading teaching hospital phoned police from his bed because he was so thirsty, an inquest heard yesterday.

Officers arrived at Kane Gorny's bedside, but were told by nurses that he was in a confused state and were sent away.

The keen footballer and runner, 22, died of dehydration a few hours later.


At one point he became so desperate and upset that staff sedated and restrained him – and on the night before his death, his mother said, he was not checked on by medical staff, despite being in a room on his own.

Following his death, a nurse allegedly inquired whether the family, from Balham, South-West London, was 'finished' and asked a matron in front of them whether she could 'bag him up'.

Mr Gorny, who worked in Waitrose and was training to be a locksmith and shoe repairer, had survived a malignant brain tumour in 2008.


www.dailymail.co.uk...




posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 04:27 AM
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reply to post by davesmart
 


Its not as simple that he wasn't given a glass of water. He had had a brain tumor which had messed up the regulation of fluids in his system. He needed a drip to support him and this was not attached.

A case of incompetence and miscommunication. The NHS has its faults but it is partly down to family members to know the situation and keep an eye on the care of a loved one and pull up any problems immediately.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 04:29 AM
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I heard about this.

I personally could not say a bad word about my local Hospital, I think they differ hugely in standards from one part of the country to the other.

Not enough fully qualified nurses and lot of migrant workers that get paid minimum wage to care.

The NHS was the most important operation the UK has produced but is now a shadow of its forma self.

"A civilized socity is judged by its care of the most vulnerable"



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 04:32 AM
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reply to post by Peruvianmonk
 


hya
i agree with you
what angers me also is the total lack of respect to the deceased by the staff
cheers
dave



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 04:34 AM
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reply to post by davesmart
 


Yes it i really isn't great is it? I mean I can imagine working within a hospital we would all become quite desensitized and flippant to death, but you need to keep that inside and remain as professional as possible.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 04:36 AM
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reply to post by judus
 

What? A migrant worker can't just walk into a hospital and get a job. They would need to have the proper certification in order to be providing care to a patient. I seriously doubt someone working in a major hospital in that capacity is making minimum wage.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 04:46 AM
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Originally posted by acmpnsfal
reply to post by judus
 

What? A migrant worker can't just walk into a hospital and get a job. They would need to have the proper certification in order to be providing care to a patient. I seriously doubt someone working in a major hospital in that capacity is making minimum wage.


After some research you are right.

I maybe should have conducted some research before stating that migrant workers would not be qualified.

So what is the problem then ?

Under staffed ?

Pay cuts ?



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 04:51 AM
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reply to post by acmpnsfal
 


Indeed, they are actually paid quite well, but they can cause other issues such as being unable to fully understand people/communicate issues or being "culturally insensitive" (read sexist or racist). That said, you can say the same for some British doctors and nurses too!

This does, however, seem to be a case of the Daily Mail doing it's usual and making a scene where there isn't one. As stated, a brain tumour can seriously mess up your internal systems and the article implies he died as a result of his "dehydration", but I doubt very much he did, especially if he was on an IV.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 04:55 AM
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Originally posted by judus
So what is the problem then ?

Under staffed ?

Pay cuts ?



In this specific instance, the problem is the Daily Mail insinuating things which aren't there.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 04:59 AM
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Originally posted by stumason

Originally posted by judus
So what is the problem then ?

Under staffed ?

Pay cuts ?



In this specific instance, the problem is the Daily Mail insinuating things which aren't there.


The NHS has always been a easy target to shift our thoughts from more pressing matters IE The Banks.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 05:47 AM
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Originally posted by judus
So what is the problem then ?
Under staffed ?
Pay cuts ?

The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

I cannot speak for the UK, but all that is happening here in the US.

Just as an example, one of my friends is an LPN. First her company took all the staffs profit sharing, and used it to open a new facility. Then they started bringing in patients that basically constituted medicare fraud at that facility (the wrong type of patients for the what the facility receives funding for). These patients were extremely difficult to deal with, most of whom were people whose families could no longer deal with them, but they had no true medical issues. The company was, and still is, being investigated for fraud over this, and it resulted in a rather public stepping down of the companies VP. Next they started forcing folks to take rotating days off to eliminate all their earned PTO time. Finally they came in one day and informed all the LPN's that they could re-apply for their jobs in two weeks, only a few would be hired back, and the ones that were would be starting over with no benefits after years of service.

These same tactics are going on all around the medical sector in the US. The threat of cutting back medicare to medicaid levels was used an an excuse, even though it has yet to happen. In my field, we have not received even so much as a cost of living increase in more then 7 years, and have also had our holidays, vacation time, and benefits cut. To make matters worse, it seems like the patients we are getting are more difficult then any we have ever had before, and our patient load is being looked at to be increased by another 1/3. I've been where I am for 10 years, and I get two weeks of vacation time plus 3 sick days. Of course there is always a screaming match when I apply to use any of that time I've earned. I received three holidays last year. I've been told to just get used to it, because its never going to increase, regardless of what the employee handbook says. If I don't like it, I have been told that I can leave whenever I wish.

Of course all these facilities know that the economy sucks, and no one whats to be out of work, so they are taking full advantage of the situation to line their own pockets. I know its even worse at some offices, and there is at least one group in my building that has been told that if they wish to use the bathroom they have to provide their own toilet paper. Others have had all their benefits completely removed, and some, such as my friend, have ended up getting royally screwed, then let go for no reason.

In many fields where medicare costs were cut, they were done so because physicians/hospitals were making too much money on various services after they were investigated. For example, in my field, reading of tests was cut because Doctors were being paid for 2 hours, when it was found that it really only took an average of 45 minutes to preform. Doctors, and hospitals, of course, refuse to accept cuts in pay, and since they hold all the power, they instead take from the staff.

Expect this to get a lot worse, because people are getting fed up, but afraid to speak out for fear of losing what jobs they do have. Then add to it, that on top of having harder work loads, being understaffed, and having more difficult patients, the government keeps adding new hoops to jump through on a yearly basis, for less and less compensation.

Right now, most of your highly trained medical staff members, who work in jobs with zero tolerance for mistakes, are working harder, making less, have less time off, and fewer benefits then guys with high school diplomas who work on your car, fix your plumbing, or hang drywall.

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.

edit on 7/3/2012 by defcon5 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 05:48 AM
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Originally posted by davesmart
reply to post by Peruvianmonk
 


hya
i agree with you
what angers me also is the total lack of respect to the deceased by the staff
cheers
dave


Exactly. His death could have been avoided if the staff were as caring as hospitals workers are "supposed" to be.

Blood on their hands... Id charge them for neglect and sue them till the rest of the world catches on.

I say this because hospitals today are neglect period. Both of my grandparents walked into a hospital healthy enough and for minor issues, none of them life threatening. Due to incompetance and lack of communication and unable to come to a agreeable choice by too many doctors involved, one not knowing a damn thing about the other... neither walked out alive.


So I say stick it to them. They're liable as can be. Dont offer to do a job if you're a screwup and dont intend to make good on 100% of what is promised. Even if preserving life isnt always possible, everything possible should be done.

This was serious neglect and horrible for the family to bare.
edit on 3-7-2012 by article because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 06:14 AM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

As long as I’m on the topic, I suppose that I should bring up one more dangerous trend that is going on. Medical facilities are cutting from the top down. In other words, they are often cutting their experienced staff members in lieu of cheaper, younger, inexperienced staff members, who are more prone to make stupid mistakes.

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 06:34 AM
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reply to post by defcon5
 




I wondered when that practice would catch up to those guys. It's been in the break back industry forever. hehe but that kind of work, you could teach a new pup. If they listen. If they dont, you could kick them ten stories to the wind. Nowdays you just cant do that quite so easy.

All the way in my teens, there was a man who was my doctor from birth. He was old as long as I can remember. This guy knew everything there was to know about me. When he wasnt around, another doc would take care of me but seldom, but always the same other doc.

There were always more doctors, many more, but these guys were more less the last of the old, Do it for the health of all, money didnt seem an issue. Maybe he had enough? who knows.

Today, going into a doctors office is like pulling teeth. It's not just healthcare cost, it's healthcare period. I might see a doc once in a while when they ask me to take a pee test for work, but other than that, I've had my fill thank you.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 08:37 AM
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Originally posted by judus

Originally posted by acmpnsfal
reply to post by judus
 

What? A migrant worker can't just walk into a hospital and get a job. They would need to have the proper certification in order to be providing care to a patient. I seriously doubt someone working in a major hospital in that capacity is making minimum wage.


After some research you are right.

I maybe should have conducted some research before stating that migrant workers would not be qualified.

So what is the problem then ?

Under staffed ?

Pay cuts ?


It may be the quota system. I know a woman who left nurse teaching because of the quota system. Basically, a fixed % of student nurses must qualify in any given intake year. My aquaintence told me that there had been years she had to pass people who were not fit (dumb, lacking empathy, even squeamish!) to work as nurses and other years, she had to fail excellent students that would have made the best sort of nurse!

Then again, it may be the 'professionalisation' of nursing, ie no more enroled nurses and registered nurses, just nurses who can register because they passed the 'degree' (where, according to my friend, the pass-mark median was(is?) adjusted yearly to ensure the quota system worked/s!). Nowadays, most nursing training is done in the classroom and not on the wards. The majority of nurses now have higher academic achievements than previous generations but there is enough evidence, imperical as well as anecdotal and via news reporting to indicate that too many modern British nurses have a lot to learn about patient and pastorol care.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 11:49 AM
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I can't say a bad word about the NHS in Scotland.

I had a severe eye injury in which i was basically blind for 3 days and the care I recieved off of them was incredible. I honestly credit my vision in my left eye to the efforts of the NHS.

My dad also went in and had a hernia operation and was out the hospital in a few days.

In my opinon we don't hear enough about the thousands the NHS save every day. we only hear about the ones they don't or the exceptional cases such as this.

Sad really.

I would still take the NHS over any other health system and i'm damn proud of it.



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