BREAKTHROUGH: Scientists Invent Particles That Will Let You Live Without Breathing

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posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 05:35 AM
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Originally posted by KireDj
One thing confuses me... So you inject this liquid into the blood stream and oxygen is supplied to the body. BUT, if your heart is not beating, there wouldn't be a blood flow. So how is the whole body oxygenated?

In alot of of cases when you have respiratory failure the heart carries on beating for a short while..




posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 05:46 AM
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If this works it'll be in every medpack (depending how easy it is to apply).

Been a while since a medical staple like this has emerged...



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 06:22 AM
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One person mentioned 'diving'. I immediately thought of escape from submarines resting, wreaked or unable to surface.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 06:39 AM
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OK posting without reading the whole thread, something I don't usually do because I have to share this with you.

I read the thread title out when I saw it. This is the conversation I had with my 13 year old daughter.

D That would save the lives of babies born with breathing difficulties

Me Yes it would, I'm very proud of you for realising that, I was thinking of being able to breath under water!

D If they could find a way of getting the human body to produce this by itself, evolution would in a few hundred years mean that we could be born without lungs!!

Me Well yes I suppose it could.

D If they used stem cells and somehow made them manifest the properties of the lipids then... that could work?

I then considered what she had just said and imagined scientists introducing such stem cells into fertilised ova and realised what my daughter at 13 was saying.

I think my daughter has a very scientific mind, I always knew she is bright but am blown away by her potential, compassion and intellect!

Very proud mum!!

I am aware that such a biological process is not very likely to be possible it's just for a child to consider such a thing demonstrates the concepts they can devise, gives me hope for the future and a little apprehension maybe.
edit on 30-6-2012 by Threegirls because: To add point



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 06:44 AM
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I´m a scuba diver.
If to much CO2 accumulates in your body you can get serious problems with flying. Because the size of the mini bubbles depends on the air pressure.
Divers have to do a deco stop or very long breaks between dives. Well, if you are active, its not that problem.
I did 4 dives a day, each one around 60 minutes with 20-25m maximum deep for 5 days. No nitrox. My computer calculated 28 hours no-fly time for me, wich ended when we walked down the gangway to the airplane luckily.

I think the kidneys could drain out the carbon with you urine maybe. I think this will only used in said emergencies, where living is the first priority, get rid of it is the thing you think about when you saved his life.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 06:46 AM
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reply to post by DARREN1976
 


Yes this is true, also once the heart is oxygenated (the most important part of resuscitation) manually through compressions if necessary then the heart will carry on in most cases.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 07:23 AM
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Originally posted by Threegirls
reply to post by DARREN1976
 


Yes this is true, also once the heart is oxygenated (the most important part of resuscitation) manually through compressions if necessary then the heart will carry on in most cases.


Well I said it before, and I'll say it again, WOW... just WOW!!! The scope for this is wide-ranging!! Kudos to your daughter by the way for having such an enquiring mind, you must be so proud!! It's the same with my lot, especially my 2nd youngest Jordan, very scientific in his approach to things and a straight A student all the way!! Makes me beam with undisguised pride when he talks about certain scientific subjects and principles...



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 07:27 AM
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This is why we as a society MUST support transhumanism.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 08:51 AM
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I don't usually get to worked up by supposed medical breakthroughs. But this one (if) it passes human testing, could be impressive indead.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 09:10 AM
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THis breakthrough is just stunning. It's actually a pretty huge advancement.

Imagine all the other applications. In fifteen years this tech will probably be cheap and found in small dosages in sports supplements. Imagine what this could do for deep sea divers. Gatorad will probably have it in the 2017 recipe. You will eventually get it as a supplement at smoothie stands. It will be included in the plots of spy thriller/ techno gadget movies for the next few years.

Troops will be popping pills of this stuff before going into combat down the road. The olympics will ban it's use during the games one day.

All in all an amazing advancement and one that will change (in small but big ways, like when the cassette deck was replaced by digital media) our daily lives for the better.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 09:11 AM
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reply to post by v1rtu0s0
 


Is that work perfectly?



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 09:18 AM
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I can see the potential for this in space travel. Suspended animation would be much easier if the astronauts didn't have to breath as often. I think this could be a big step toward interplanetary flight/interstellar flight.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 09:26 AM
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Originally posted by JiggyPotamus
The first thing I thought of was the misuse of this breakthrough in aerobic sports. But, I don't know if it will increase the amount of oxygen in the bloodstream if it is already at baseline levels. I remember reading about a drug for a specific organ deficiency of some sort that increased oxygen levels in the bloodstream, and athletes were using it to gain an edge in sports like track, or sprinting, and basically any other sport where increased oxygen in the bloodstream will increase performance.


You're thinking of erythropoietin, nicknamed EPO. It's a hormone which stimulates the production of erythrocytes (red blood cells) in the bone marrow. Athletes use this to increase their hematocrit, which is the proportion of red blood cells out of the total blood volume. A normal level is approximately 37% to 50% depending on which lab is drawing samples; any higher than that causes risk for abnormal clotting. Since there are more oxygen-carrying cells, the tissues are able to be better oxygenated, but as I said before there are risks...not to mention that it is unscrupulous when applied to competitive sports.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 09:40 AM
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Impressive. makes me think of all the possibilities, the good and the wicked ones. even Jack would have lived room for two or not.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 09:42 AM
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Originally posted by Ilyich
reply to post by xEphon
 


You naturally exhange gasses from your blood in your lungs, pretty much the only way to get it out naturally. I can't think of a safe method that wouldn't over whelm another vital organ in the process. Injecting a substance to capture the CO2, would require some organ or another technology to remove that particle. The more you mess with the fine tuned balance of the human body the more risks you have, and considered the potential harm too much CO2 in the body can have, keeping it in any longer than it takes for your lungs to take it out isn't a good idea. This is a great short term solution, that will save many lives in an emergency situation, unfortunately The amount and rate at which our bodies need oxygen, and produce by products may limit the exclusions of lungs any time soon.

During a respiratory failure, or lung transplant this is a remarkable tool, how ever outside of that it may not see much use. Our lungs are more efficient than this particle anyhow, and 30 minutes of oxygen to keep us alive, probably wouldn't be enough in any alert, active state. It just doesn't make logical sense to take a shot and try to work in an environment with out oxygen, you would naturally try to breath and may in fact panic, if you did not. The excess CO2 in the blood stream after the oxygen is worn off would likely cause unpleasant side effects I'm sure there may well be other limitations to the use of this substance, the most obvious being CO2 created by our bodies, no lungs no relief. Though it may be safe in the presence of trained medical professionals, every individual requires different amounts of oxygen, at different rates, and the risk for taking more than the safe dose may be too great for this to be a self administered medication.

Still fascinating none the less.


I don't think CO2 would be an issue since you are not inhaling into you lungs and it is being expelled as a nonusalbe gas for the body. Think of the lungs as a a filtering exchange unit!



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 09:56 AM
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reply to post by v1rtu0s0
 


This stuff would b amazing for health care but what if i was in good health and i injected my self with it would it let me to stay under water for 30 minutes? thats would b better when some watter animals capabilities .



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 10:01 AM
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Originally posted by fnpmitchreturns

Originally posted by Ilyich
reply to post by xEphon
 


You naturally exhange gasses from your blood in your lungs, pretty much the only way to get it out naturally. I can't think of a safe method that wouldn't over whelm another vital organ in the process. Injecting a substance to capture the CO2, would require some organ or another technology to remove that particle. The more you mess with the fine tuned balance of the human body the more risks you have, and considered the potential harm too much CO2 in the body can have, keeping it in any longer than it takes for your lungs to take it out isn't a good idea. This is a great short term solution, that will save many lives in an emergency situation, unfortunately The amount and rate at which our bodies need oxygen, and produce by products may limit the exclusions of lungs any time soon.

During a respiratory failure, or lung transplant this is a remarkable tool, how ever outside of that it may not see much use. Our lungs are more efficient than this particle anyhow, and 30 minutes of oxygen to keep us alive, probably wouldn't be enough in any alert, active state. It just doesn't make logical sense to take a shot and try to work in an environment with out oxygen, you would naturally try to breath and may in fact panic, if you did not. The excess CO2 in the blood stream after the oxygen is worn off would likely cause unpleasant side effects I'm sure there may well be other limitations to the use of this substance, the most obvious being CO2 created by our bodies, no lungs no relief. Though it may be safe in the presence of trained medical professionals, every individual requires different amounts of oxygen, at different rates, and the risk for taking more than the safe dose may be too great for this to be a self administered medication.

Still fascinating none the less.


I don't think CO2 would be an issue since you are not inhaling into you lungs and it is being expelled as a nonusalbe gas for the body. Think of the lungs as a a filtering exchange unit!


Your body naturally converts O2 to CO2 whether your lungs are taking in the O2 or it is being delivered to your blood via these particles.

This was invented due to a pediatrician not being able to save a child who had a collapsed lung. She later died of complications that arouse from lack of oxygen.

Life threatening complications due to lack of oxygen can arise as soon as 4 minutes; however, life threatening complications due to a buildup of CO2 takes about 30 minutes, which is often enough time needed for a doctor to stabilize a patient who suffered from these type of conditions.

I do believe people will expand on this tech in the future though.

As an example. If you hold your breath, for the first few seconds you have no desire to breath. Your brain registers that is has enough oxygen and your body is content.
It isn't until oxygen levels start to deplete, which is rather quickly, that you feel the urge to breath; however, if your body were to be oxygenated via an artificial means, you would literally have no desire or urge to breath.

So yeah, I definitely see further applications of this.
edit on 30-6-2012 by xEphon because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 10:25 AM
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reply to post by v1rtu0s0
 


Yeah we knew this already. Harry Potter drank some of this during the triwizard tournament, its made with gillyweed.
All kidding aside, that is quite amazing !



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 10:28 AM
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reply to post by Deaf Alien
 


The technology used in the Abyss is real too. It is liquid oxygen and its not just in the movies.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 10:29 AM
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Great find OP. Thanks for posting S+F! I don't have anything really unique to add... I just have to echo this thread's motif, "wow"





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