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My personal Vetting Of Barack Obama: I am now a birther

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posted on May, 30 2012 @ 11:17 AM
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reply to post by seeker1963
 


Difference is, Obama said its up to the states..
Romney wants to amend the constitution to forbid it.

Do you not see the difference?

As far as the other legalize it stuff...I agree, it should be a state issue. the removal of the fed ban needs to go away.




posted on May, 30 2012 @ 11:21 AM
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Many red blooded Americans have questions about the whole birther issue, just like many have questions about 9-11.

Questions. As in, not being fully convinced yet. That is all. Questions. Not wild eyed tin-foil-hat conspiracy nonsense. Questions.

It is very patriotic to question those in power over you. Yes, respect the office, and yes hope for the best.

But don't be a sheep. Don't swallow everything a politician says and believe it. Trust but verify.

This country was FOUNDED by people who questioned the people in power over them, and they decided that what they were doing was wrong on a fundamental level.

The founding documents are worded very carefully because the people that wrote them were well versed in human nature, and knew full well the tendency for people to seek power who may have hidden agendas.

They knew that there would be other nations who would try to take over and change the country from the inside by seeking high office, a bloodless revolution. That is the reason for the specific words Natural Born Citizen. The founders weren't just writing meaningless extra words. Put yourself in their shoes, try to imagine what was at stake for them.

What is stunning is that it is so easy to recruit and hire shills to come on here and post. How much money is being spent to try and change minds on issues?

That itself is telling, "they" (those who would find it worth the money to pay shills) must still require the hearts and minds of the people, "they" must have some value on what WE think.

Flattering, really...



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 11:50 AM
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reply to post by SaturnFX
 



Difference is, Obama said its up to the states..
Romney wants to amend the constitution to forbid it.

Do you not see the difference?

As far as the other legalize it stuff...I agree, it should be a state issue. the removal of the fed ban needs to go away.


I absolutely see the difference! I was just pointing out the hypocracy! I have nothing against gay marriage. It doesn't affect me and it doesn't involve me. It is two people who are doing something that does not hurt me one bit whatsoever. I hate right/left, gay/straight etc etc arguements. They are pointless, unless they are harming other people, and by harming, I do not mean violating ones religious, political, or egotistical beliefs. If you don't like what you see or hear, don't look and don't listen.

Romney will be no different than our current POTUS. Most people who are homophobic, are that way because they are having issues with their own personal feelings. Religion, should NEVER, stick it's nose into peoples lives who have different beliefs....



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 01:17 PM
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Alright OP you have sparked my interest so I'm going to have to read Obama's book now. Guess I will have to keep a bucket beside my chair just in case I need to throw up a time or two while reading it.


S&F, Good Thread OP.



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 01:18 PM
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Pretty sure Donald Trump signed up to ATS and is trolling all of us with multiple accounts.




posted on May, 30 2012 @ 01:38 PM
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Originally posted by SeventhSeal
Pretty sure Donald Trump signed up to ATS and is trolling all of us with multiple accounts.



Now that's funny!!



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 01:41 PM
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Originally posted by SeventhSeal
Pretty sure Donald Trump signed up to ATS and is trolling all of us with multiple accounts.



Rofl.... oh noes!



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 01:43 PM
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reply to post by Fondue
 


Thank you bringing another voice of reason to the Natural Born debaucle.....I feel so alone out here!!!




posted on May, 30 2012 @ 01:46 PM
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reply to post by jjf3rd77
 


So now that Paul is out of the way you're going to focus on Obama now? How corporate. Goal achieved. Next goal. Got it.



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 02:01 PM
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www.art2superpac.com...

Dred Scott v. Sandford, 60 U.S. 393 (1857) The citizens are the members of the civil society; bound to this society by certain duties, and subject to its authority, they equally participate in its advantages. The natives, or natural-born citizens, are those born in the country, of parents who are citizens. As society cannot perpetuate itself otherwise than by the children of the citizens, those children naturally follow the condition of their parents, and succeed to all their rights.' Again: 'I say, to be of the country, it is necessary to be born of a person who is a citizen; for if he be born there of a foreigner, it will be only the place of his birth, and not his country. . .
reply to post by windword
 



Minor v. Happersett , 88 U.S. 162 (1875) The Constitution does not in words say who shall be natural-born citizens. Resort must be had elsewhere to ascertain that. At common law, with the nomenclature of which the framers of the Constitution were familiar, it was never doubted that all children born in a country of parents who were its citizens became themselves, upon their birth, citizens also. These were natives or natural-born citizens, as distinguished from aliens or foreigners. Some authorities go further and include as citizens children born within the jurisdiction without reference to the citizenship of their parents. As to this class there have been doubts, but never as to the first.

United States v. Wong Kim Ark, 169 U.S. 649 (1898) At common law, with the nomenclature of which the framers of the Constitution were familiar, it was never doubted that all children, born in a country of parents who were its citizens, became themselves, upon their birth, citizens also. These were natives, or natural-born citizens, as distinguished from aliens or foreigners.

Perkins v. Elg, 307 U.S. 325 (1939), was a decision by the Supreme Court of the United States that a child born in the United States to naturalized parents on U.S. soil is a natural born citizen and that the child's natural born citizenship is not lost if the child is taken to and raised in the country of the parents' origin, provided that upon attaining the age of majority, the child elects to retain U.S. citizenship "and to return to the United States to assume its duties." Not only did the court rule that she did not lose her native born Citizenship but it upheld the lower courts decision that she is a "natural born Citizen of the United States" because she was born in the USA to two naturalized U.S. Citizens. "But the Secretary of State, according to the allegation of the bill of complaint, had refused to issue a passport to Miss Elg 'solely on the ground that she had lost her native born American citizenship.' The court below, properly recognizing the existence of an actual controversy with the defendants [307 U.S. 325, 350] (Aetna Life Ins. Co. v. Haworth, 300 U.S. 227 , 57 S.Ct. 461, 108 A.L.R. 1000), declared Miss Elg 'to be a natural born citizen of the United States' (99 F.2d 414) and we think that the decree should include the Secretary of State as well as the other defendants. The decree in that sense would in no way interfere with the exercise of the Secretary's discretion with respect to the issue of a passport but would simply preclude the denial of a passport on the sole ground that Miss Elg had lost her American citizenship." The Supreme Court of the United States has never applied the term “natural born citizen” to any other category than “those born in the country of parents who are citizens thereof”.

The effort to remove the natural-born citizen requirement from the U.S. Constitution actually began in 1975 – when Democrat House Rep. Jonathon B. Bingham, [NY-22] introduced a constitutional amendment under H.J.R. 33: which called for the outright removal of the natural-born requirement for president found in Article II of the U.S. Constitution – “Provides that a citizen of the United States otherwise eligible to hold the Office of President shall not be ineligible because such citizen is not a natural born citizen.” Bingham’s first attempt failed and he resurrected H.J.R. 33: in 1977 under H.J.R. 38:, again failing to gain support from members of congress. Bingham was a Yale Law grad and member of the secret society Skull and Bones, later a lecturer at Columbia Law and thick as thieves with the United Nations via his membership in the Council on Foreign Relations. Bingham’s work lay dormant for twenty-six years when it was resurrected again in 2003 as Democrat members of Congress made no less than eight (8) attempts in twenty-two (22) months, to either eliminate the natural-born requirement, or redefine natural-born to accommodate Barack Hussein Obama II in advance of his rise to power. The evidence is right in the congressional record… 1. On June 11, 2003 Democrat H



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 02:03 PM
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And here are the attempts by the left to remove the Natural born Citizen clause..if it doesn't mean 2 citizen parents then why is it sooooo important to remove it...and keep trying and trying...and then send the media out in full force to tell everyone it doesn't mean what the right says it means..."ignore all those definitions and supreme court decisions..they are all wrong"...I smell a rat...


www.art2superpac.com...

1. On June 11, 2003 Democrat House member Vic Snyder [AR-2] introduced H.J.R 59: in the 108th Congress – “Constitutional Amendment – Makes a person who has been a citizen of the United States for at least 35 years and who has been a resident within the United States for at least 14 years eligible to hold the office of President or Vice President.” – Co-Sponsors: Rep Conyers, John, Jr. [MI-14]; Rep Delahunt, William D. [MA-10]; Rep Frank, Barney [MA-4]; Rep Issa, Darrell E. [CA-49]; Rep LaHood, Ray [IL-18]; Rep Shays, Christopher [CT-4]. 2. On September 3, 2003, Rep. John Conyers [MI] introduced H.J.R. 67: – “Constitutional Amendment – Makes a person who has been a citizen of the United States for at least 20 years eligible to hold the office of President.” – Co-Sponsor Rep Sherman, Brad [CA-27] 3. On February 25, 2004, Republican Senator Don Nickles [OK] attempted to counter the growing Democrat onslaught aimed at removing the natural-born citizen requirement for president in S.2128: – “Natural Born Citizen Act – Defines the constitutional term “natural born citizen,” to establish eligibility for the Office of President” – also getting the definition of natural born citizen wrong. – Co-sponsors Sen Inhofe, James M. [OK]; Sen Landrieu, Mary L. [LA] 4. On September 15, 2004 – as Barack Obama was about to be introduced as the new messiah of the Democrat Party at the DNC convention, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher [CA-46] introduced H.J.R. 104: – “Constitutional Amendment – “Makes eligible for the Office of the President non-native born persons who have held U.S. citizenship for at least 20 years and who are otherwise eligible to hold such Office.” – No co-sponsors. 5. Again on January 4, 2005, Rep John Conyers [MI] introduced H.J.R. 2: to the 109th Congress – “Constitutional Amendment – Makes a person who has been a citizen of the United States for at least 20 years eligible to hold the Office of President.” – Co-Sponsor Rep Sherman, Brad [CA-27] 6. Rep Dana Rohrabacher [CA-46] tries again on February 1, 2005 in H.J.R. 15: – “Constitutional Amendment – Makes eligible for the Office of the President non-native born persons who have held U.S. citizenship for at least 20 years and who are otherwise eligible to hold such Office.” – No Co-Sponsor 7. On April 14, 2005, Rep Vic Snyder [AR-2] tries yet again with H.J.R. 42: – “Constitutional Amendment – Makes a person who has been a citizen of the United States for at least 35 years and who has been a resident within the United States for at least 14 years eligible to hold the office of President or Vice President.” – Co-Sponsor Rep Shays, Christopher [CT-4] 8. All of these efforts failing in committee and the 2008 presidential election looming with an unconstitutional candidate leading the DNC ticket, Democrat Senator Claire McCaskill, [MO] tries to attach the alteration to a military bill in S.2678: on February 28, 2008 – “Children of Military Families Natural Born Citizen Act – Declares that the term “natural born Citizen” in article II, section 1, clause 5 of the Constitution, dealing with the criteria for election to President of the United States, includes any person born to any U.S. citizen while serving in the active or reserve components of the U.S. armed forces.” – Co-Sponsors DNC Presidential candidate Sen Clinton, Hillary Rodham [NY]; DNC Presidential candidate Sen Obama, Barack [IL]; Sen Menendez, Robert [NJ]; Sen Coburn, Tom [OK] – (This was the first effort to also assure that GOP Presidential candidate Sen. John McCain [AZ] would be cleared to run against the DNC primary victor.) From June 11, 2003 to February 28, 2008, there had been eight (8) different congressional attempts to alter Article II – Section I – Clause V – natural born citizen requirements for president in the U.S. Constitution, all of them failing in committee — All of it taking placing during Barack Obama’s rise to political power and preceding the November 2008 presidential election. In politics, there are no coincidences… not of this magnitude. Finally on April 10, 2008, unable to alter or remove the natural born citizen requirement to clear the way for Barack Obama, the U.S. Senate acts to shift focus before the election, introducing and passing S.R.511: – declaring Sen. John McCain a “natural born citizen” eligible to run for and hold the office of president. There was never any honest doubt about McCain, the son of a U.S. Navy Commander. The Sponsor of the resolution is Democrat Senator Claire McCaskill, [MO] S.R.511 States that John Sidney McCain, III, is a “natural born Citizen” under Article II, Section 1, of the Constitution of the United States. S.R511 passed by a 99-0 unanimous consent of the Senate, with only John McCain not voting. The basis was – “Whereas John Sidney McCain, III, was born to American citizens;” – a condition not met by Barack Hussein Obama II. – Co-Sponsors DNC Presidential candidate Sen Clinton, Hillary Rodham [NY]; DNC Presidential candidate Sen
edit on 30-5-2012 by timetothink because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 02:08 PM
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Notice that Bingham declares Houard to be a “natural-born citizen” by citing two factors – born of citizen parents in the US. John Bingham, aka “father of the 14th Amendment”, was an abolitionist congressman from Ohio who prosecuted Lincoln’s assassins. Ten years earlier, he stated on the House floor: All from other lands, who by the terms of [congressional] laws and a compliance with their provisions become naturalized, are adopted citizens of the United States; all other persons born within the Republic, of parents owing allegiance to no other sovereignty, are natural born citizens. Gentleman can find no exception to this statement touching natural-born citizens except what is said in the Constitution relating to Indians. - (Cong. Globe, 37th, 2nd Sess., 1639 (1862)) Then in 1866, Bingham also stated on the House floor: Every human being born within the jurisdiction of the United States of parents not owing allegiance to any foreign sovereignty is, in the language of your Constitution itself, a natural born citizen.... - (Cong. Globe, 39th, 1st Sess., 1291 (1866))
So why have they been trying to change the constitutional term Natural Born all the while pretending the term doesn't mean what it means??

www.art2superpac.com...!Presidents-Eligibility-Grandfather-Clause-Natural-Born-Citizen-Clause-or-Seated-by-Fraud.pdf



The Venus, 12 U.S. 8 Cranch 253 253 (1814) Vattel, who, though not very full to this point, is more explicit and more satisfactory on it than any other whose work has fallen into my hands, says: “The citizens are the members of the civil society; bound to this society by certain duties, and subject to its authority, they equally participate in its advantages. The natives or indigenes are those born in the country of parents who are citizens. Society not being able to subsist and to perpetuate itself but by the children of the citizens, those children naturally follow the condition of their fathers, and succeed to all their rights.

edit on 30-5-2012 by timetothink because: (no reason given)

3. Rep. John Bingham, Principal Framer of the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. During a debate (see pg. 2791) regarding a certain Dr. Houard, who had been incarcerated in Spain, the issue was raised on the floor of the House of Representatives as to whether the man was a US citizen. Representative Bingham (of Ohio), stated on the floor: As to the question of citizenship I am willing to resolve all doubts in favor of a citizen of the United States. That Dr. Houard is a natural-born citizen of the United States there is not room for the shadow of a doubt. He was born of naturalized parents within the jurisdiction of the United States, and by the express words of the Constitution, as amended to-day, he is declared to all the world to be a citizen of the United States by birth. (The term “to-day”, as used by Bingham, means “to date”. Obviously, the Constitution had not been amended on April 25, 1872.)

Because this fear of foreign influence on a future President and Commander in Chief was strongly felt, Jay took it upon himself to draft a letter to General George Washington, the presiding officer of the Constitutional Convention, recommending/hinting that the framers should strengthen the Citizenship requirements for the office of the President. John Jay was an avid reader and proponent of natural law and particularly Vattel’s codification of natural law and the Law of Nations. In his letter to Washington he said that the Citizenship requirement for the office of the commander of our armies should contain a “strong check” against foreign influence and he recommended to Washington that the command of the military be open only to a “natural born Citizen”. Thus Jay did not agree that simply being a “born Citizen” was sufficient enough protection from foreign influence in the singular most powerful office in the new form of government. Rather, Jay wanted to make sure the President and Commander In Chief owed his allegiance solely to the United States of America. He wanted another adjective added to the eligibility clause, i.e., ‘natural’. And that word ‘natural’ goes to the Citizenship status of one’s parents via natural law.

edit on 30-5-2012 by timetothink because: (no reason given)



I think that is enough to make my case for the definition of natural born and the left's attempt to circumvent it.
edit on 30-5-2012 by timetothink because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by Tardacus
 


American citizen yes....natural born no...



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 02:42 PM
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reply to post by jjf3rd77
 
Welcome to the club. I used to be a racist, which is why I voted for Obama (just because he was black and I figured it was time we had one for President). Since then and frankly, the moment he screwed up his Oath Of Office and later re-took it without the right Bible or saying the oath properly (intentionally) I began to have misgivings that grew into out and out lack of trust, dislike and firm opposition. I have STOPPED being a racists like all is supporters and judge the man on the facts; the facts are he is NOT a Natural Born American Citizen, NOT Eligible to run for or hold the office of President and is a Coke Smoking Closet Homosexual Marxist Traitor and Enemy of our Constitution, our Republic and everything I love and cherish about MY COUNTRY.

So, once again, welcome to the club.



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 03:05 PM
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So how exactly did you "vet" the President? You sound like Donald Trump. And now Mitt Romney released his birth certificate, as if anyone gives a damn. Nice if Mitt said something on policy, then we would have something to talk about. And how about Mitts tax returns, and the "cuddly" relationship Mitt has with Trump, thats criminally stupid.

And anyone still buying into this birthed nonsense, well hard to explain that other then people who just hate Obama. So why not just come out and say you hate the man, not this made up birther crap?



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by SaturnFX
 


so if both of your parents are natural born citizens with ancestors dating back to the revolution and your mother goes into labor while they are on vacation in canada then you can never be president of the U.S. because you had the bad luck of being born outside of U.S. soil?
meanwhile a pakistani family has a baby on U.S soil the day after they legally become citizens their baby can legally be the president someday?



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 03:26 PM
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Well, I have an audiobook version of this, so far I have gotten past the preface and introduction. I have transcribed it for those that would like to read it. Keep in mind, I am no pro transcriber, or english scholar.... The words are all correct though, the punctuation and capitalization might not be.


Almost a decade has passed since this book was first published. As I mention in the original introduction, the opportunity to write the book came while I was in law school, the result of my election as the first African-American president of the Harvard Law Review. In the wake of some modest publicity, I received an advance from a publisher and went to work with the belief that the story of my family, and my efforts to understand that story, might speak in some way to the fissures of race that have characterized the American experience, as well as the fluid state of identity, the leaps through time, the collision of cultures, that mark our modern life.

Like most first-time authors, I was filled with hope and despair upon the book’s publication-hope that the book might succeed beyond my youthful dreams, despair that I had failed to say anything worth saying. The reality fell somewhere in between. The reviews were mildly favorable. People actually showed up at the readings my publisher arranged. The sales were underwhelming. And, after a few months, I went on with the business of my life, certain that my career as an author would be short lived, but glad to have survived the process with my dignity more or less intact.

I had little time for reflection over the next ten years. I ran a voter registration project in the 1992 election cycle, began a civil rights practice, and started teaching constitutional law at the University of Chicago. My wife and I bought a house, were blessed with two gorgeous, healthy, and mischievous daughters, and struggled to pay the bills. When a seat in the state legislature opened up in 1996, some friends persuaded me to run for the office, and I won. I had been warned, before taking office, that state politics lacks the glamour of its Washington counterpart, one labors largely in obscurity, mostly on topics that mean a great deal to some but that the average man or woman on the street can safely ignore ,the regulation of mobile homes, say, or the tax consequences of farm equipment depreciation. Nonetheless, I found the work satisfying, mostly because the scale of state politics allows for concrete results.An expansion of health insurance for poor children, or a reform of laws that send innocent men to death row, within a meaningful time frame. And too, because within the capitol building of a big, industrial state, one sees every day the face of a nation in constant conversation. Inner-city mothers and corn and bean farmers, immigrant day laborers alongside suburban investment bankers, all jostling to be heard, all ready to tell their stories.

A few months ago, I won the democratic nomination for a seat as the U.S. senator from Illinois. It was a difficult
race, in a crowded field of well funded, skilled, and prominent candidates. Without organizational backing or personal wealth, a black man with a funny name, I was considered a long shot. And so, when I won a majority of the votes in the democratic primary, winning in white areas as well as black, in the suburbs as well as Chicago, the reaction that followed echoed the response to my election to the Law Review. Mainstream commentators expressed surprise and genuine hope that my victory signaled a broader change in our racial politics. Within the black community, there was a sense of pride regarding my accomplishment, a pride mingled with frustration that fifty years after brown vs. board of education and forty years after the passage of the voting rights act, we should still be celebrating the possibility, and only the possibility, for I have a tough general election coming up, that I might be the sole African American-and only the third since Reconstruction-to serve in the Senate. My family, friends, and I were mildly bewildered by the attention, and constantly aware of the gulf between the hard sheen of media reports and the messy, mundane realities of life as it is truly lived.

edit on Wed, 30 May 2012 15:26:36 -0500 by TKDRL because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 03:28 PM
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Just as that spate of publicity prompted my publisher’s interest a decade ago, so has this fresh round of news clippings encouraged the book’s republication. For the first time in many years, I’ve pulled out a copy and read a few chapters to see how much my voice may have changed over time. I confess to wincing every so often at a poorly chosen word, a mangled sentence, an expression of emotion that seems indulgent or overly practiced. I have the urge to cut the book by fifty pages or so, possessed as I am with a keener appreciation for brevity. I cannot honestly say, however, that the voice in this book is not mine, that I would tell the story much differently today than I did ten years ago, even if certain passages have proven to be inconvenient politically, the grist for pundit commentary and opposition research.

What has changed, of course, dramatically, decisively, is the context in which the book might now be read. I began writing against a backdrop of Silicon Valley and a booming stock market, the collapse of the Berlin Wall. Mandela,in slow, sturdy steps, emerging from prison to lead a country. The signing of peace accords in Oslo. Domestically, our cultural debates, around guns and abortion and rap lyrics, seemed so fierce precisely because Bill Clinton’s Third Way. A scaled back welfare state without grand ambition but without sharp edges, seemed to describe a broad, underlying consensus on bread and butter issues. A consensus to which even George W. Bush’s first campaign, with its compassionate conservatism, would have to give a nod. Internationally, writers announced the end of history, the ascendance of free markets and liberal democracy, the replacement of old hatreds and wars between nations with virtual communities and battles for market share.

And then, on September 11, 2001, the world fractured. It’s beyond my skill as a writer to capture that day, and the days that would follow. The planes, like specters, vanishing into steel and glass; the slow-motion cascade of the towers crumbling into themselves, the ash covered figures wandering the streets, the anguish and the fear. Nor do I pretend to understand the stark nihilism that drove the terrorists that day and that drives their brethren still. My powers of empathy, my ability to reach into another’s heart, cannot penetrate the blank stares of those who would murder innocents with abstract, serene satisfaction.

What I do know is that history returned that day with a vengeance. That, in fact, as Faulkner reminds us, the past is never dead and buried,it isn’t even past. This collective history, this past, directly touches my own. Not merely because the bombs of Al Qaeda have marked, with an eerie precision, some of the landscapes of my life. The buildings and roads and faces of Nairobi, Bali, Manhattan. Not merely because, as a consequence of 9/11, my name is an irresistible target of mocking websites from overzealous republican operatives. But also because the underlying struggle, between worlds of plenty and worlds of want. Between the modern and the ancient. Between those who embrace our teeming, colliding, irksome diversity, while still insisting on a set of values that binds us together, and those who would seek, under whatever flag or slogan or sacred text, a certainty and simplification that justifies cruelty toward those not like us, is the struggle set forth, on a miniature scale, in this book.

I know, I have seen, the desperation and disorder of the powerless. How it twists the lives of children on the streets of Jakarta or Nairobi in much the same way as it does the lives of children on Chicago’s South Side. How narrow the path is for them between humiliation and untrammeled fury, how easily they slip into violence and despair. I know that the response of the powerful to this disorder-alternating as it does between a dull complacency and, when the disorder spills out of its proscribed confines, a steady, unthinking application of force, of longer prison sentences and more sophisticated military hardware-is inadequate to the task. I know that the hardening of lines, the embrace of fundamentalism and tribe, dooms us all.

And so what was a more interior, intimate effort on my part, to understand this struggle and to find my place in it, has converged with a broader public debate, a debate in which I am professionally engaged, one that will shape our lives and the lives of our children for many years to come.

The policy implications of all this are a topic for another book. Let me end instead on a more personal note. Most of the characters in this book remain a part of my life, albeit in varying degrees, a function of work, children, geography, and turns of fate.



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 03:30 PM
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The exception is my mother, whom we lost, with a brutal swiftness, to cancer a few months after this book was published. She had spent the previous ten years doing what she loved. She traveled the world, working in the distant villages of Asia and Africa, helping women buy a sewing machine or a milk cow or an education that might give them a foothold in the world’s economy. She gathered friends from high and low, took long walks, stared at the moon, and foraged through the local markets of Delhi or Marrakesh for some trifle, a scarf or stone carving that would make her laugh or please the eye. She wrote reports, read novels, pestered her children, and dreamed of grandchildren.

We saw each other frequently, our bond unbroken. During the writing of this book, she would read the drafts,
correcting stories that I had misunderstood, careful not to comment on my characterizations of her but quick to explain or defend the less flattering aspects of my father’s character. She managed her illness with grace and good humor, and she helped my sister and me push on with our lives, despite our dread, our denials, our sudden constrictions of the heart.

I think sometimes that had I known she would not survive her illness, I might have written a different book, less a meditation on the absent parent, more a celebration of the one who was the single constant in my life. In my daughters I see her every day, her joy, her capacity for wonder. I won’t try to describe how deeply I mourn her passing still. I know that she was the kindest, most generous spirit I have ever known, and that what is best in me I owe to her.


Ok there it is. He seems to be a very longwinded writer. A bit of that racism creeping in as well.
edit on Wed, 30 May 2012 15:31:36 -0500 by TKDRL because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 03:31 PM
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Originally posted by Tardacus
reply to post by SaturnFX
 


so if both of your parents are natural born citizens with ancestors dating back to the revolution and your mother goes into labor while they are on vacation in canada then you can never be president of the U.S. because you had the bad luck of being born outside of U.S. soil?
meanwhile a pakistani family has a baby on U.S soil the day after they legally become citizens their baby can legally be the president someday?




Yes.



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