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Do you have a supply of ramen noodles in your prep stores?

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posted on May, 13 2012 @ 05:40 AM
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Originally posted by MI5edtoDeath
reply to post by muzzleflash
 


Many thanks dude. I will try out the Maggi Noodles. I just ordered some on the internet and they are cheap.

Some dried noodles are deep fried to add a sheen to the noodles. When I discovered my Chinese neighbours did touch the stuff, my alarms bells went. They told me the brand I was eating was full of chemicals dipped in oil fryers.



It's really hard to tell what's in your food if you didn't create every part of it at home yourself. And even if you did create it yourself, due to wind blowing pollutants everywhere it may even be polluted then as well.

But the major pollution areas are most likely during the industrial process itself, rather than from regional contamination.

So in the end really the best way is to make it yourself from scratch, by finding really good recipes or making up your own. That's extremely difficult because who grows their own varied crops and has livestock for flavoring etc?
However you can get these ingredients from local farms in various markets and catch them before they were industrially contaminated, at least to a degree.

Ok here's what you do (according to my quick research heh) - get flour sure, this seems to be requirement for pasta. "Flour" can be made of all sorts of plant materials apparently.


Flour is a powder which is made by grinding cereal grains, other seeds or roots (like Cassava). It is the main ingredient of bread, which is a staple food for many cultures, making the availability of adequate supplies of flour a major economic and political issue at various times throughout history. Wheat flour is one of the most important foods in European, North American, Middle Eastern and North African cultures, and is the defining ingredient in most of their styles of breads and pastries. Maize flour has been important in Mesoamerican cuisine since ancient times, and remains a staple in much of Latin American cuisine.[citation needed] Rye flour is an important constituent of bread in much of central/northern Europe.

Flour wiki

I was talking about Yakisoba earlier and it is commonly made from buckwheat flour according to various sources.

Link on How to Make Pasta from scratch

Now also I have been googling for "egg substitutes in pastas", and many claim to have great luck leaving the eggs out completely, while others have devised countless egg substitutions for making pastas.

Apparently there is no all inclusive recipe, and you can mix and match your own concoctions until you find what you like. Try different amounts/ratios of various ingredients, google around for lists on suggestions. I even saw a flax seed pasta suggested, quite surprising.

I see many recipes call for table salt (NaCl) to be added, but I am not certain if this is a physical requirement or simply a taste issue. If it is simply based upon taste, than you can either cut it out entirely or lower the amount to what fits your personal tastes.

Plus it appears that you can substitute different types of oils, I have seen a few different ones listed (olive, etc).

I am certainly no expert but it does seem to be a rather simple endeavor to begin attempting to make your own personal styles of ramen noodle at home. By all forms of logical analysis I can apply to it, cooking with raw ingredients (from local sources you have investigated), appears to be the safest method of food preparation in relation to the amounts of contaminants that are in the food itself.

Cutting the middle-men out of the picture will also prove to be a boon for localized farming outfits and it would really start to hit the bottom line with the corporations. For purposely putting countless questionable additives in mass produced food they should be rightfully punished by people refusing to buy their contaminated products anymore.

It's much wiser to get less-contaminated products directly from the producers.
There are usually "farmers" markets still in many locations globally, and that is a viable alternative to anything from the agriculture/food industry mega-corporations.

If anyone finds anything wrong with the information I dug up on how pasta is made please clarify and correct my mistakes. Thanks.

Oh and for fun, try making pastas without a machine. Doing it by hand would be a very interesting and rewarding experience for us lazy modernized humans. Just think about it, how many people have actually made pasta with their own hands? Yet how many people eat pasta? Crazy I know.




posted on May, 13 2012 @ 06:37 AM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 





Oh and for fun, try making pastas without a machine. Doing it by hand would be a very interesting and rewarding experience for us lazy modernized humans. Just think about it, how many people have actually made pasta with their own hands? Yet how many people eat pasta? Crazy I know.


Yes, I made pasta many times years ago as a child with my mother using this machine;




It was unusual and delicious. I highly recommend that you do it with your family and friends and try it out.

You got to have eggs in pasta otherwise it gets gluttonous.



I also discovered this machine while looking for the above image;



It is from a Chinese trade site. I will look around the stores to see if they are any good and buy one. I might just do a thread on an electric pasta machine in future.
edit on 13-5-2012 by MI5edtoDeath because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 06:44 AM
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Yes we have ramen noodles in our prep supplies.
I also have a pasta making machine and have made spaghetti with it.
However, I don't think it will do any good when TSHTF.
You have to have eggs to make the noodles .. and we live in a city and have no chickens.

But yes .. ramen noodles ... easy to store and have carbs.



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 06:58 AM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


My dad used to make his own "noodles", hand cut - no machine at all, but what he called noodles were pretty thick and heavy, more like what my missus calls "dumplings".



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 07:01 AM
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Originally posted by MI5edtoDeath

I also discovered this machine while looking for the above image;



It is from a Chinese trade site. I will look around the stores to see if they are any good and buy one. I might just do a thread on an electric pasta machine in future.
edit on 13-5-2012 by MI5edtoDeath because: (no reason given)


It looks like a couple of the hamburger grinders we used to have, so a hamburger grinder - either electric or hand-cranked - would probably work, too, with the right extrusion grate to get the noodles sized right.



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 07:06 AM
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Originally posted by FlyersFan
Yes we have ramen noodles in our prep supplies.
I also have a pasta making machine and have made spaghetti with it.
However, I don't think it will do any good when TSHTF.
You have to have eggs to make the noodles .. and we live in a city and have no chickens.

But yes .. ramen noodles ... easy to store and have carbs.


Even when TS hasn't yet HTF, there is a difference in store-bought eggs and home-raised eggs. Home raised eggs are richer, and have darker yolks. that may have an effect on noodle consistency, flavor, and nutritive value as well.



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 07:31 AM
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Originally posted by EfficacyOfTruth
I love me some top ramen. Open the top of the pack, pour half the seasoning in, shake, eat raw. Mmm mm... Ghetto chips.


YES!! I was wondering if someone else eats them raw like I do.. I have a serious issue with the seasoning and cannot hardly stomach ramen cooked with it. once I wanted to just munch something but we had nothing else and I figured that I would try the ramen plain and wow..best thing ever.



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 10:02 AM
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reply to post by dayve
 


I live near a major river and I have bleach.

Ha ha.



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 10:08 AM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


Apparently you' ve never really been betrayed.

You're lucky. You've missed some of the worst pain there is.

There's nothing quite like it.



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 03:22 PM
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If you only ate ramen noodles you would probably get scurvy. In fact a few people every year on college campus who spend all their money on booze and then eat ramen noodles the rest of the month end up with scurvy.



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 04:32 PM
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Originally posted by FlyersFan
I also have a pasta making machine and have made spaghetti with it.
However, I don't think it will do any good when TSHTF.
You have to have eggs to make the noodles .. and we live in a city and have no chickens.

You don't really need either to make noodles. Here is an egg-less recipe and a how-to on hand cut noodles.
Eggless pasta
Hand cut noodles

I think ramen is good for buggin in but to bulky for traveling. Easily takes up 8-10 times the space of any other dry food. Spaghetti or fettuccine would probably be a better traveling noodles.

ETA: Just noticed that the hand cut noodle is also eggless and uses only one type of flour so it is even simpler than Batali's.

edit on 13-5-2012 by daskakik because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 05:17 PM
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Originally posted by rebellender
reply to post by AGWskeptic
 


ever read any books on the mountain men, wild game you are apt to come into will not have the fat content your body will need for prolonged nutrition,,,,besides informative they are pretty crazy stories about what they did to survive, which most didnt, by the way.

think twice about carbs
edit on 12-5-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)


Oh yeah, I think I've read them all. John Colter, Jedediah Smith, John Johnson, Christopher Carson, William Sublette, and of course Jim Bridger. Those guys survived on sheer willpower alone, takes a lot to kill a guy like that.

I was telling my kids about how sickly the early settlers were because of their wild game diet. It wasn't until they put livestock in pens that they fattened up.

I factored this in with the sardines packed in oil and canned ham, but by the time that runs out we should be on or near water, and fish have great oils heathwise. Domesticated chickens have loads of fat too, so hopefully we'll have a few around.



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 05:20 PM
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Wow - I don't think I've ever seen anyone quite so passionate about noodles.



posted on May, 13 2012 @ 07:33 PM
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Originally posted by rtyfx
reply to post by muzzleflash
 


Apparently you' ve never really been betrayed.

You're lucky. You've missed some of the worst pain there is.

There's nothing quite like it.


How did you make this observation? Based on comments about Ramen noodles?
Can you fortune tell us anything important? Or just personal faults you assume exist?

Like someone on the Internet would have a clue about that stuff....



posted on May, 14 2012 @ 05:42 AM
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reply to post by AGWskeptic
 


Depends on what you're willing to eat - some critters are fatter than others. Woodchuck, raccoon, and bear are fat-heavy, while deer are fat-poor. Deer fat runs more to tallow.

On the subject of Mountain Men, there is a book titled "Journal of a Trapper", and it's a printing of the journal kept by Osborne Russell during his years in the Rocky Mountain fur trade. It's well worth the read if you can find a copy.



posted on May, 14 2012 @ 08:41 AM
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Originally posted by nenothtu
reply to post by AGWskeptic
 


Depends on what you're willing to eat - some critters are fatter than others. Woodchuck, raccoon, and bear are fat-heavy, while deer are fat-poor. Deer fat runs more to tallow.

On the subject of Mountain Men, there is a book titled "Journal of a Trapper", and it's a printing of the journal kept by Osborne Russell during his years in the Rocky Mountain fur trade. It's well worth the read if you can find a copy.



Tell 'em about spleen dip and what "salad" is..........most have no idea what we are in for, mostly
edit on 14-5-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2012 @ 07:52 PM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 


Thanks for the heads up, I'll see if I can get a copy ordered in to my local library.

I was talking mostly about the prairie settlers since that's where I live (not far from Walnut Grove actually), and they ate lots of rabbits. Once and a while they'd get a deer or a turkey, but as you probably know, not much fat on wild turkey either.

Plus it tastes bad, the fat and connective tissue is what gives wild game it's reputation for being "gamey". I'm very careful about processing my deer, takes forever but there is nothing but red meat when I'm done.

As things are now I butcher a hog right before deer hunting and we mix up a big batch of sausage with 2 parts pork to 1 part venison. Not sure what I'd do if SHTF, but my guess is that pigs will still be around if I am.



posted on May, 15 2012 @ 03:49 PM
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Originally posted by rebellender

Tell 'em about spleen dip and what "salad" is..........most have no idea what we are in for, mostly
edit on 14-5-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)


Growing up, I ate whatever I could get a hold of - rabbit, groundhog, squirrels, deer, snakes, turtles - even "grampus", which I think other parts of the country call "hellbenders" - they're like a giant salamander that lives in rivers, whatever kind of fish I could catch (including gar fish, if that's what jumped on my line, which happened twice), wild greens like pokeweed and field cress, dandelions, ramps, etc. If it wasn't poisonous, I'd eat it, and some things that WERE poisonous got eaten - rattlesnakes come to mind.

The thing is, when it comes to keeping your belt buckle from slapping your backbone around, some times you just can't be too particular. If it comes to that, they'll figure it out, I think. I'm not above eating rats, if that's what's available. After a few days of NOT easting, you'd be amazed at what you can make yourself eat!



posted on May, 15 2012 @ 03:55 PM
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reply to post by AGWskeptic
 


I've never mixed pork with my venison, but a lot of the people around here do that. I always ground the majority of my venison into burger, without admixture. Makes great chili, but if you fry it - like hamburger patties - you'll have to add some sort of grease (lard, butter, vegetable oil - whatever is close to hand), because there isn't enough in it natively to keep it from sticking to the frying pan.

I once used hog chop as flour to make biscuits with so that I'd have some bread to go with my deer burger. I'm still kicking along just fine. When it comes to surviving, you'll do what's necessary, and yes, I expect hogs will be around as long as people are. The wild ones are entertaining to hunt - if you got really good reflexes!



posted on May, 15 2012 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by nenothtu
The thing is, when it comes to keeping your belt buckle from slapping your backbone around, some times you just can't be too particular.
 

exactly,,,and why one should have some cheap comfort food and a bottle of hooch around during the onslaught of a S Hitting T F ...

About the mountain man....."salad" is the stomach contents of a large animal kill, they said at first it tasted like vomit but they acquired a taste for it,,,they would upon a kill first cut into the Liver or Heart or kidneys depending on what their bodies told them they needed and would lance the spleen and dip the organ meat of choice into the spleen and eat um up...dont cook it dont pass go dont collect 200 dollars just eat the still hot quivering meat....

because they were starving from nutrients they were not getting.


TRUE STORY,,,,and be very careful or brave at what you wish for

ETA: mixing pork fat with Lean Venison is CHOICE Berger
edit on 15-5-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)






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