Do you have a supply of ramen noodles in your prep stores?

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posted on May, 17 2012 @ 12:31 AM
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Originally posted by nenothtu
reply to post by AGWskeptic
 


I've never mixed pork with my venison, but a lot of the people around here do that. I always ground the majority of my venison into burger, without admixture. Makes great chili, but if you fry it - like hamburger patties - you'll have to add some sort of grease (lard, butter, vegetable oil - whatever is close to hand), because there isn't enough in it natively to keep it from sticking to the frying pan.

I once used hog chop as flour to make biscuits with so that I'd have some bread to go with my deer burger. I'm still kicking along just fine. When it comes to surviving, you'll do what's necessary, and yes, I expect hogs will be around as long as people are. The wild ones are entertaining to hunt - if you got really good reflexes!



I shot a Javelina in Arizona about 20 years ago, smelled it for 30 minutes before I saw it.

The guide was this little old Mexican dude who was tough as nails. We caped it in the field and he went for a walk while I got firewood. He came back with prickly pear cactus fruit and a bunch of cactuss leaves. He skinned and sliced the cactus and fried it with a little flour and salt and pepper in an iron skillet, then he did the tenderloin in medallions using the fruit to make a sauce when he deglazrd the pan. It was an amazing meal. I still buy cactus once and a while but it's never as good.

I was, and still am, in awe of this man.

I think a lot of people will survive, at least of the rural folk. City folk are just plain screwed.




posted on May, 17 2012 @ 06:59 PM
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reply to post by AGWskeptic
 


Where i grew up in the Appalachians, some variety of prickly pear cactus grew wild - or probably more likely "feral". I'd imagine it got out of someone's garden and spread like wildfire in the rocky terrain of the pastures. I don't know what kind it was, but it would grow in beds around 4 or 5 feet around. it didn't have thorns sticking out - it had little harmless looking bumps, but if you grabbed a leaf of it, your hand would come back looking like a pincushion with hundreds of tiny hair-like spines that were a real pain to extract. My hat's off to your guide as well - there's no way I'd try to eat one of those! I wouldn't even try to pick one after the first (and last) attempt!



posted on May, 22 2012 @ 04:35 AM
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The flavor packets go bad after a few years you'll want to maintain a large container of bullion type flavoring that you rotate by using.



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 04:49 AM
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reply to post by MI5edtoDeath
 


Hey OP (MI5edtodeath).....Nong Shim Shin Bowl noodles ARE DEEP FRIED contrary to what you said in the OP. Any thoughts or comments about that? That they're not deep fried (according to you) was one of the main points of this thread, right? Maybe you, and seemingly everyone else, missed my strikingly on topic post back on page 5? Here's the link again just in case you didn't see it....and yes the link IS specific to Nong Shim's manufacturing process.....THEIR NOODLES ARE FRIED IN PALM OIL.

www.foodprocessing-technology.com...

Nong shim noodles ARE fried in palm oil just like nissin top ramen, cup noodles, maruchan etc.



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 02:49 PM
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Originally posted by BULLPIN
reply to post by MI5edtoDeath
 


Hey OP (MI5edtodeath).....Nong Shim Shin Bowl noodles ARE DEEP FRIED contrary to what you said in the OP. Any thoughts or comments about that? That they're not deep fried (according to you) was one of the main points of this thread, right? Maybe you, and seemingly everyone else, missed my strikingly on topic post back on page 5? Here's the link again just in case you didn't see it....and yes the link IS specific to Nong Shim's manufacturing process.....THEIR NOODLES ARE FRIED IN PALM OIL.

www.foodprocessing-technology.com...

Nong shim noodles ARE fried in palm oil just like nissin top ramen, cup noodles, maruchan etc.



Thanks for your belated information. Please refer to a scan of the wrapper below.

Nong Shim Foods do use palm oil in powdered form to make the noodles. The idea is that when you prepare the noodles in hot water, preferably steeped in 82°C for 4 minutes for optimum slurpiness, so that powdered palm oil which is a homogeneous component of the noodle liquifies in the hot water. The slight oiliness prevents the noodles from sticking together, it prevents the noodles from getting soggy and binds flavours to each strand of noodle.

Nong Shim do not fry their noodles.




Dude, I am 25% noodles...check my pockets


.
edit on 31-5-2012 by MI5edtoDeath because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by MI5edtoDeath
 


Well, even if they were not fried but just sprayed with oil it's still in there but the Nong Shim Site states:


After stretching, strands of noodles with about 43% moisture are conveyed through a steam tunnel, where they are cooked before entering a steam-fired palm-oil fryer.


So yes they are fried.



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 05:09 PM
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Originally posted by daskakik
reply to post by MI5edtoDeath
 


Well, even if they were not fried but just sprayed with oil it's still in there but the Nong Shim Site states:


After stretching, strands of noodles with about 43% moisture are conveyed through a steam tunnel, where they are cooked before entering a steam-fired palm-oil fryer.


So yes they are fried.


I suppose it is one form of cooking with oil to use steam laced with oil on noodles.

And no, I would argue that it is not frying in the conventional sense as in frying in a vat of oil. It is oil suspended in steam in a pressured chamber.




The photo shows a heat exchanger and conveyor belt that fires oil ladened food like crisps/chips and my favourite noodles.

Dude, if I couldn't eat my noodles I'd just die.



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 05:20 PM
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reply to post by MI5edtoDeath
 

Don't kid yourself, if it contains the same amount of oils as other noodles, then it doesn't matter how the oils got in there.

Why would you not be able to eat you're noodles? Forget what your neighbors said and just enjoy.



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 05:26 PM
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Originally posted by daskakik
reply to post by MI5edtoDeath
 

Don't kid yourself, if it contains the same amount of oils as other noodles, then it doesn't matter how the oils got in there.

Why would you not be able to eat you're noodles? Forget what your neighbors said and just enjoy.


Thanks. I will try to. Maybe moderation is in order.



posted on Jun, 2 2012 @ 09:44 PM
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Sorry if it has been posted before, I didnt want to read through all 10 pages, but about the fried/non-fried and seasonings with MSG and such:
ramenrater.wordpress.com...
It is a brand from Singapore, I believe, named Koka.
I think the seasonings might just have other forms of MSG though. The veggies are allegedly seasonal.
I am ordering some right meow, ill let you guys know what I think and what is in them.
edit on 2-6-2012 by smashdem because: (no reason given)
edit on 2-6-2012 by smashdem because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 03:09 PM
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Besides, there is an art and science to the preparation of Ramen Noodles that every college student should master! They should teach a Freshman economics class on Ramen Noodles and beer!


After they come to a rolling boil, let them cook like that for 1 minute, then remove from heat, and drain out about half the water. Add the flavor pack, a little bit of seasoning salt, and a packet of Lipton Cup-A-Soup (chicken noodle). Stir to mix, let sit for about 1 more minute, and that's yummy. If you're feeling fancy, add a small can of pre-cooked chicken to it (drain out the water from the can first) the same time as the seasoning.

I still use this as a cure-all when I'm sick. It instantly kills a sore throat for a while (all the sodium I guess), and makes me feel better almost immediately.

I practically lived off these things my first couple years of college, and on my own.



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


I pour off all the broth into a coffee cup and drink it. It is a great cure for a sore throat. I either eat the noodles or stir-fry them with egg and cheese. When times are good I might add ham or tuna or chicken, but it isn't necessary, and times are rarely that good, LOL!



posted on Jun, 18 2012 @ 03:40 PM
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reply to post by MI5edtoDeath
 


Didn't read the entire thread, "prolly been mentioned"...but keep inmind getting the bag style..."noodles"...crunch-em up add flavour packet..shake and eat like chips....no water nedded....nice to hafe as a chaser for sure though.....besides .22 shells vs weight vs...protien to potentially be gained...I'll stick with .22 rim fire..

ETA considering I can put nearly 500 rounds in one bag O noddles....afterr empty....that is...
edit on 18-6-2012 by Doc Holiday because: OCD and blank boxs



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 03:22 PM
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I used to eat them like that as a kid...I tried it again that way as an adult...no thanks. Don't know what I was thinking. Much better when boiled.



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 09:46 AM
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posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 09:48 AM
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posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 09:51 AM
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posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 09:56 AM
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posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 10:03 AM
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posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 10:08 AM
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