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Newfound "super-Earth"

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posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 05:57 PM
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reply to post by Patriotsrevenge
 


How do you get 95,000 yrs it takes 38,000 yrs to travel one light yr so 22 would be around 840,000 yrs so im saying thats a no go




posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 06:01 PM
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reply to post by jazz10
 


Are you a Nibiru Truther?

My Nibu-dar is going off like crazy right now.



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 06:17 PM
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Originally posted by ssupp
reply to post by 6minutes212
 


ONLY 22 lightyears?
You do realize it still takes 95,000 years for us to reach that with our current mainstream technology, right?


Using very round figures and assuming we have a manned spacecraft that can travel the speed most argue Voyager 1 is going away from our sun, and if it was heading right for this star, it would take like 385,770 years for Voyager to reach that star, roughly.

But the light gets here in just 22 years. In celestial time, not much happens in 22 years, if you were on Jupiter, 22 earth years would be like your 2 years and just under 2 months. (Of course Jupiter spins 2.5 times faster than earth, so we would be talking a lot more shorter days in a Jupiter year than 365.25). Imagine what the work week would be like on Jupiter.



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 06:17 PM
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Originally posted by jtap66
reply to post by 6minutes212
 

Only 22 light years! Why, we could go and be back in time for the Super Bowl!


Light travels at 186,000 miles per second, so how far does light travel in a year? Yeah you might make it back in time for super bowl 20,000+. By the time you got back to earth you would find earth had become the Planet of the Apes.



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 06:32 PM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 
I'm right there with you on that,I just wonder how long it would take to screw it up also?



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 06:44 PM
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Originally posted by lonewolf19792000

Originally posted by jtap66
reply to post by 6minutes212
 

Only 22 light years! Why, we could go and be back in time for the Super Bowl!


Light travels at 186,000 miles per second, so how far does light travel in a year? Yeah you might make it back in time for super bowl 20,000+. By the time you got back to earth you would find earth had become the Planet of the Apes.


Light travels about, roughly, an estimated 5,878,625,373,183.6 miles in an estimated average of a Gregorian year, but things get kind of rounded, so 20,000 years would mean you have went at least one light year if you are going the average estimated speed of Voyager 1, with a few thousand years in your pocket to stop at McDonalds left over.

So the round trip to this star and back will actually take more like 771,550 years, and the McDonalds fries would not have decomposed yet.




posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 06:46 PM
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reply to post by Illustronic
 





So the round trip to this star and back will actually take more like 771,550 years, and the McDonalds fries would not have decomposed yet.


Like i said, you would get back in time to see earth had become the Planet of the Apes.



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 07:17 PM
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reply to post by JOBEone
 


There is plenty of research into alternate ways of interstellar travel.

The problem, right now, is in relation to travel time, see below quote'




It can be argued that an interstellar mission which cannot be completed within 50 years should not be started at all. Instead, assuming that a civilization is still on an increasing curve of propulsion system velocity, not yet having reached the limit, the resources should be invested in designing a better propulsion system.

This is because a slow spacecraft would probably be passed by another mission sent later with more advanced propulsion.[2] On the other hand, Andrew Kennedy has shown that if one calculates the journey time to a given destination as the rate of travel derived from growth (even exponential growth) increases, there is a clear minimum in the total time to that destination from now (see wait calculation).[3]

Voyages undertaken before the minimum will be overtaken by those who leave at the minimum, while those who leave after the minimum will never overtake those who left at the minimum. Any civilization traveling to an interstellar destination can look forward to a unique date that is best to leave, and one that is the most efficient with cost and time.


Here is a NASA article on breakthroughs in propulsion systems

www.nasa.gov...



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 08:18 PM
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Being part of a 3 star system, would it ever have pure night time? Imagine having 3 suns!! I know it says they would be a bit faint but still! I wanna goooo!!



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 08:38 PM
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I call President of the New Earth!


2nd



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 09:27 PM
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Awesome news, with something specific to reach for and learn about that may give a serious boost to research on new faster ways to travel. We are far from getting there at the moment but science has taken great leaps before.

Who knows what may be right around the corner. Maybe some of the research being done with the large hadron collider will lead to some amazing discoveries able to make that distance seem less imposing.



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 09:27 PM
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THAT'S NO MOON!!!! ERR PLANET!!!!

Just sayin'. The Niberu people need another distraction, no?!



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 10:36 PM
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reply to post by Illustronic
 


WHAT?!?!

There is ABSOLUTELY NO PRACTICAL APPLICATION/USE for this planet.
At least not with our current technology.
Nor any tech in the foreseeable future.

Beyond that is anyone's guess, but this (your) post is completely irrelevant.



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 11:45 PM
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The system has much lower abundances of heavy elements (elements heavier than hydrogen and helium), such as iron, carbon and silicon.


So when we're invaded, we'll know what they've come for. Hide the silicon!



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 11:51 PM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


Yeh,,lets just go I reckon it will be just a lil % of a fast ride



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 12:28 AM
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Originally posted by jtap66
reply to post by 6minutes212
 

Only 22 light years! Why, we could go and be back in time for the Super Bowl!


yes!
lol no, but in all seriousness that is really close compared to a lot of the other planets that have been found. Nice thread!



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 12:49 AM
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reply to post by ExCommando
 


Very cool info, thank you!!!



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 02:14 AM
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reply to post by jeff68
 


By the time that happens, we are twenty generations further, or eaten by a 20 feet tall alien T-Rex



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 02:38 AM
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I see the discussion above about how long it would take to travel/send a probe to this planet.

Did anyone notice this comment? This bloke seems to know about something we don't.


"The planets coming out of Kepler are typically thousands of light-years away and we could never send a space probe out there," Vogt said. "We've been explicitly focusing on very nearby stars, because with today's technology, we could send a robotic probe out there, and within a few hundred years, it could be sending back picture postcards."


Interesting statement to say the least, few hundred years?

That's a fast ride


Or is he joking?



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 04:24 AM
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Originally posted by ssupp
reply to post by 6minutes212
 


ONLY 22 lightyears?
You do realize it still takes 95,000 years for us to reach that with our current mainstream technology, right?


Maybe so, but theoretically we could send a message there via radio waves and receive a reply back in only 44 years..



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