Could You Stomach These Great Depression Meals?

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posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 12:59 PM
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Some of these are okay. But I think one of the most economical and also tasty foods is white rice. You can boil it and it tastes delicious. Add various sauces and seasonings to give it flavor. Once I was so poor, all I had was bags of rice in my pantry, and buffalo sauce (ran out of chicken) and some cajun seasoning. Those three ingredients lasted me a long time. Rice is also good when you add butter and salt. Really, you could add anything to give it flavor, but even by itself, boiled or steamed white rice is delicious.




posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 01:07 PM
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I have to say we now have ramen too, and this is really good with American cheese melted in it or hotdogs fried and put in them. These will be the new "Depression meals". Also chili one of my favorite meals, became popular in the depression:

By the depression years, the chili joints meant the difference between starvation and staying alive. Chili was cheap and crackers were free. At the time, chili was said to have saved more people from starvation than the Red Cross. The Dictionary of American Regional English describes chili joints as: "A small cheap restaurant, particularly one that served poor quality food."

History and Legends of Chili

Also Pasta is very cheap, and the spanish version even cheaper and made with semolina. Chili mac is yummy


ETA: Add sausage gravy more readily found than chipped beef and just as good.
edit on 31-12-2011 by ldyserenity because: to add



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 01:13 PM
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If I can eat McDonald's, I can eat anything on this list. Lard sandwich is supposed to be shocking? Haven't you ever heard of a Big Mac? Haha.

But no, seriously, who could complain about hot dogs and baked beans? There was a point in my life where that was a bowl of Easy Mac away from the perfect meal. That point was yesterday.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by cdnutz44
Another thing that I don't see many people talk about.....GRITS!!!

I like them with butter, my wife and daughter like a bit of milk and sugar with them.....and they make a great dinner with some shrimp if you happen to live near the coast. They store well and a little goes a long way, much like rice!


I love grits, they are so good! I have had them with butter, milk and sugar and I have had them more savory like too. Grits..polenta.. not all that different by the way!



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 05:50 PM
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I would think however if times got bad enough that we had to eat anywhere near similarly to what they did in the great depression that more people would start growing their own gardens. Times are not even bad and we have our own garden out back. This next summer I am going to be canning and preserving more of what we grow so that we can use it through the winter.

My grandma who went through some of the depression as well as her parents and never went without food. They always had a huge garden and she would talk about how after they moved to Colorado that their garden extended past their back yard and filled their side yard. When they were down in Texas they had a farm and grew their own food so they always had plenty.

These days people take up most yard space for more decorative landscaping purposes, but if it came down to it a lot more people could grow their own food in their yards. If it got bad I could grow so so much food on our property, even though it is just an average size house lot, nothing out of the norm. We could turn the front yard, the side yards and all of the back yard into a garden. Oh and container gardening can be done for those who don't actually have any yard to grow in. Community gardens are all over the place these days or if it came down to it you could probably grow food along ditches/waterways and old unused land areas. If I had to I would find somewhere and some way to grow my own food.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 06:45 PM
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Originally posted by ldyserenity
I have to say we now have ramen too, and this is really good with American cheese melted in it or hotdogs fried and put in them. These will be the new "Depression meals". Also chili one of my favorite meals, became popular in the depression:

By the depression years, the chili joints meant the difference between starvation and staying alive. Chili was cheap and crackers were free. At the time, chili was said to have saved more people from starvation than the Red Cross. The Dictionary of American Regional English describes chili joints as: "A small cheap restaurant, particularly one that served poor quality food."

History and Legends of Chili

Also Pasta is very cheap, and the spanish version even cheaper and made with semolina. Chili mac is yummy


ETA: Add sausage gravy more readily found than chipped beef and just as good.
edit on 31-12-2011 by ldyserenity because: to add


Ramen!
Take a plain package and add anything to it, even with cup o' soups, add cheese, tuna, salmon or even egg. Frying the noodles in the meat/cheese combo is a good alternative to boiling.

My grandma-in-law was the one who showed me Ramen Noodle Salad(one of those, "why didn't I think of that!?"). Ramen, keep dried with no bullion is crunched up and added to the salad's ingredients of choice. Similar Ramen Noodle Salad recipe to hers see here.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 07:45 PM
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I believe I read here on ATS, but could not find that Cat and Dog food has to made edible for not only the animals but human consumption as well, may not taste good but has what human need, it's a much cheaper way to eat if you cannot afford proper food.....

I remember now, on the show DUAL SURVIVAL on the Discovery channel. where they survive using and taking apart a blue standard truck in the woods of a old logging site, (maybe the Northern East Coast?)

So, if you had so survive without the money to buy the things listed in OP, and could afford the lesser grade I.E. animal food, would you?

Just a Thought.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 07:55 PM
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Having family that grew up in the depression and being a country tadpole I've eaten many of these. My list - with commentary..

Chipped beef on toast - yup - it ain't bad.

Hot milk and rice - yup - never really cared that much for it.

Gopher - no, but other family members have.

Potato soup – water base, not milk. Yup - not bad. Kinda bland

Dandelion salad - pretty dang good actually.

Sugar sandwiches - yup as a kid. What kid doesn't like sugar?

Hot dogs and baked beans - who hasn't?

Fried potatoes and hot dogs - not bad at all..

Cornbread in milk - my dad loved this. It looks nasty thou.

Gravy and bread – as a main dish - if biscuits and sausage gravy count.

Squirrel - fixed right its dang good.

Beans - oh yeah

Boiled cabbage - ditto

There are several more on the list that I could name. Point being - not everything on that list is "blah". Some of it is simple, cheap - but actually not 1/2 bad.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 09:07 PM
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Originally posted by Communicationwillfreeus

I have so many questions. How many armpits have you fried? How do they taste? I would guess pretty bad, but I have never been brave enough to try it.


One more than was necessary to know that your guess is right!



Get used to the idea. Should the S ever HTF, burning the dead when they are laying all around is the quickest, most labor-effective way to get them out of a form dangerous to the water table, thus helping prevent the spread of such nasties as cholera.

Burning bodies do NOT "smell like chicken". They DO, however, smell a lot like frying bologna.



edit on 2011/12/31 by nenothtu because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 09:25 PM
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Originally posted by TXTriker

My mom used to make what she called "hoover gravy". You make a regular gravy base with flour and butter. Then you add cocoa and sugar. Add in the milk or water to thickness desired. Pour it over buttered biscuits for breakfast. I still make it sometimes. We love it.



Sounds like what my mom called "chocolate gravy". Good stuff. Added bonus: chill it for a couple hours, and you've got chocolate pudding!



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 09:53 PM
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Originally posted by nenothtu

Originally posted by Communicationwillfreeus

I have so many questions. How many armpits have you fried? How do they taste? I would guess pretty bad, but I have never been brave enough to try it.


One more than was necessary to know that your guess is right!



Get used to the idea. Should the S ever HTF, burning the dead when they are laying all around is the quickest, most labor-effective way to get them out of a form dangerous to the water table, thus helping prevent the spread of such nasties as cholera.

Burning bodies do NOT "smell like chicken". They DO, however, smell a lot like frying bologna.



edit on 2011/12/31 by nenothtu because: (no reason given)


Your making me hungry.....mmmm baloney.



posted on Jan, 1 2012 @ 07:58 AM
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reply to post by ldyserenity
 


yep, brick chili, my grandma said they used to wait in the relief line to get brick chili that they'd have to cut the mold off of, and were glad to get it.



posted on Jan, 1 2012 @ 04:00 PM
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Chipped beef on toast? We call that sh!t on a shingle.

Yum yum.





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