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Before we all go out and vote next year...Please consider

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posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 04:39 PM
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Taking the time to carefully review and familiarize ourselves with the United States Bill of Rights 1 - 10 & Amendments 11-27, if you're not already. I feel this is just the first necessary step of many in choosing the next elected officials. If we don't get it right this time around, then we could really be sending ourselves further up/down #### Creek without a Paddle (I think you all know the word I omitted).

I am pretty certain who I will be voting for (I will not mention it publicly) and many of you have probably made your minds up as well or are at least close in making a decision. However, no matter who we choose to be our next state and federally elected officials, I can not think of a better time to educate ourselves about our rights as US Citizens. If we ever expect to be treated with any amount of respect again (which we are not currently IMO), we better know what these candidates stand for. Any demands we have and how we will go about making sure said demands are met could be gaged in advance if we all know who we will be dealing with in the future (I do not intend to come across as a tyrant, I just want some freaking fairness for everyone for a change). In addition to knowing our Bill of Rights and the Amendments, we should research and study the past of every single candidate's personal and political life...this is our right as well. I want to know what the #### I'm getting myself into or out of next time around.

After I voted for Obama, my state senators, etc., etc., the heartache I have felt since they took office is undeniable. I have gone through many emotional transformations about the current administration. Everything from "yeah, now we're gonna take care of business" and the ever so popular "Yes We Can" to "Boy, what's taking these guys and gals so long" and "Come on people, get it done already" and "I'll be damed, we've been tricked, had...bamboozled even" to finally "No trickery here, just me who was very well UNINFORMED about President Obama's Cast & Crews personal and political past", which pretty much amounted to nothing. Right about now, a hill of beans is worth more than anything a single elected official has done thus far IMO.

Before I post the Bill of Rights and the Amendments, I would like to say that I am not making an attempt to treat anyone on ATS like they are ignorant, stupid, crazy or anything of the like. I am just sitting here today at home thinking to myself about the future of our nation and a better way for us all as US Citizens to get ready for the next election. My conclusion was knowing the Bill of Rights inside and out. It's just the beginning!

As they say....just adding my $0.02



The Bill of Rights: A Transcription

The Preamble to The Bill of Rights

Congress of the United States
begun and held at the City of New-York, on
Wednesday the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty nine.

THE Conventions of a number of the States, having at the time of their adopting the Constitution, expressed a desire, in order to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further declaratory and restrictive clauses should be added: And as extending the ground of public confidence in the Government, will best ensure the beneficent ends of its institution.

RESOLVED by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, two thirds of both Houses concurring, that the following Articles be proposed to the Legislatures of the several States, as amendments to the Constitution of the United States, all, or any of which Articles, when ratified by three fourths of the said Legislatures, to be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of the said Constitution; viz.

ARTICLES in addition to, and Amendment of the Constitution of the United States of America, proposed by Congress, and ratified by the Legislatures of the several States, pursuant to the fifth Article of the original Constitution.

Note: The following text is a transcription of the first ten amendments to the Constitution in their original form. These amendments were ratified December 15, 1791, and form what is known as the "Bill of Rights."


Amendment I

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Amendment II

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

Amendment III

No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.

Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Amendment V

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

Amendment VI

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence.

Amendment VII

In Suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.

Amendment VIII

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

Amendment IX

The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

Amendment X

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

Bill of Rights 1 - 10

Amendments 11 - 27 listed in the following post
edit on 12/8/11 by ThePublicEnemyNo1 because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 04:41 PM
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AMENDMENT XI
Passed by Congress March 4, 1794. Ratified February 7, 1795.

Note: Article III, section 2, of the Constitution was modified by amendment 11.

The Judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by Citizens of another State, or by Citizens or Subjects of any Foreign State.


AMENDMENT XII
Passed by Congress December 9, 1803. Ratified June 15, 1804.

Note: A portion of Article II, section 1 of the Constitution was superseded by the 12th amendment.

The Electors shall meet in their respective states and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as Vice-President, and they shall make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, and of all persons voted for as Vice-President, and of the number of votes for each, which lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate; -- the President of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the certificates and the votes shall then be counted; -- The person having the greatest number of votes for President, shall be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed; and if no person have such majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers not exceeding three on the list of those voted for as President, the House of Representatives shall choose immediately, by ballot, the President. But in choosing the President, the votes shall be taken by states, the representation from each state having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall be necessary to a choice. [And if the House of Representatives shall not choose a President whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of March next following, then the Vice-President shall act as President, as in case of the death or other constitutional disability of the President. --]* The person having the greatest number of votes as Vice-President, shall be the Vice-President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed, and if no person have a majority, then from the two highest numbers on the list, the Senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of Senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States.

*Superseded by section 3 of the 20th amendment.


AMENDMENT XIII
Passed by Congress January 31, 1865. Ratified December 6, 1865.

Note: A portion of Article IV, section 2, of the Constitution was superseded by the 13th amendment.

Section 1.
Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

Section 2.
Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.


AMENDMENT XIV
Passed by Congress June 13, 1866. Ratified July 9, 1868.

Note: Article I, section 2, of the Constitution was modified by section 2 of the 14th amendment.

Section 1.
All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

Section 2.
Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed. But when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for President and Vice-President of the United States, Representatives in Congress, the Executive and Judicial officers of a State, or the members of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being twenty-one years of age,* and citizens of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion, or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the number of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of age in such State.

edit on 12/8/11 by ThePublicEnemyNo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 04:41 PM
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AMENDMENT XV
Passed by Congress February 26, 1869. Ratified February 3, 1870.

Section 1.
The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude--

Section 2.
The Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.


AMENDMENT XVI
Passed by Congress July 2, 1909. Ratified February 3, 1913.

Note: Article I, section 9, of the Constitution was modified by amendment 16.

The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration.


AMENDMENT XVII
Passed by Congress May 13, 1912. Ratified April 8, 1913.

Note: Article I, section 3, of the Constitution was modified by the 17th amendment.

The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, elected by the people thereof, for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in each State shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State legislatures.

When vacancies happen in the representation of any State in the Senate, the executive authority of such State shall issue writs of election to fill such vacancies: Provided, That the legislature of any State may empower the executive thereof to make temporary appointments until the people fill the vacancies by election as the legislature may direct.

This amendment shall not be so construed as to affect the election or term of any Senator chosen before it becomes valid as part of the Constitution.


AMENDMENT XVIII
Passed by Congress December 18, 1917. Ratified January 16, 1919. Repealed by amendment 21.

Section 1.
After one year from the ratification of this article the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purposes is hereby prohibited.

Section 2.
The Congress and the several States shall have concurrent power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Section 3.
This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress.


AMENDMENT XIX
Passed by Congress June 4, 1919. Ratified August 18, 1920.

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.


edit on 12/8/11 by ThePublicEnemyNo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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AMENDMENT XX
Passed by Congress March 2, 1932. Ratified January 23, 1933.

Note: Article I, section 4, of the Constitution was modified by section 2 of this amendment. In addition, a portion of the 12th amendment was superseded by section 3.

Section 1.
The terms of the President and the Vice President shall end at noon on the 20th day of January, and the terms of Senators and Representatives at noon on the 3d day of January, of the years in which such terms would have ended if this article had not been ratified; and the terms of their successors shall then begin.

Section 2.
The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and such meeting shall begin at noon on the 3d day of January, unless they shall by law appoint a different day.

Section 3.
If, at the time fixed for the beginning of the term of the President, the President elect shall have died, the Vice President elect shall become President. If a President shall not have been chosen before the time fixed for the beginning of his term, or if the President elect shall have failed to qualify, then the Vice President elect shall act as President until a President shall have qualified; and the Congress may by law provide for the case wherein neither a President elect nor a Vice President shall have qualified, declaring who shall then act as President, or the manner in which one who is to act shall be selected, and such person shall act accordingly until a President or Vice President shall have qualified.

Section 4.
The Congress may by law provide for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom the House of Representatives may choose a President whenever the right of choice shall have devolved upon them, and for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom the Senate may choose a Vice President whenever the right of choice shall have devolved upon them.

Section 5.
Sections 1 and 2 shall take effect on the 15th day of October following the ratification of this article.

Section 6.
This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the date of its submission.


AMENDMENT XXI
Passed by Congress February 20, 1933. Ratified December 5, 1933.

Section 1.
The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby repealed.

Section 2.
The transportation or importation into any State, Territory, or Possession of the United States for delivery or use therein of intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby prohibited.

Section 3.
This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by conventions in the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress.


AMENDMENT XXII
Passed by Congress March 21, 1947. Ratified February 27, 1951.

Section 1.
No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the office of President more than once. But this Article shall not apply to any person holding the office of President when this Article was proposed by Congress, and shall not prevent any person who may be holding the office of President, or acting as President, during the term within which this Article becomes operative from holding the office of President or acting as President during the remainder of such term.

Section 2.
This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the date of its submission to the States by the Congress.


AMENDMENT XXIII
Passed by Congress June 16, 1960. Ratified March 29, 1961.

Section 1.
The District constituting the seat of Government of the United States shall appoint in such manner as Congress may direct:

A number of electors of President and Vice President equal to the whole number of Senators and Representatives in Congress to which the District would be entitled if it were a State, but in no event more than the least populous State; they shall be in addition to those appointed by the States, but they shall be considered, for the purposes of the election of President and Vice President, to be electors appointed by a State; and they shall meet in the District and perform such duties as provided by the twelfth article of amendment.

Section 2.
The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.


edit on 12/8/11 by ThePublicEnemyNo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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AMENDMENT XXIV
Passed by Congress August 27, 1962. Ratified January 23, 1964.

Section 1.
The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of failure to pay poll tax or other tax.

Section 2.
The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.


AMENDMENT XXV
Passed by Congress July 6, 1965. Ratified February 10, 1967.

Note: Article II, section 1, of the Constitution was affected by the 25th amendment.

Section 1.
In case of the removal of the President from office or of his death or resignation, the Vice President shall become President.

Section 2.
Whenever there is a vacancy in the office of the Vice President, the President shall nominate a Vice President who shall take office upon confirmation by a majority vote of both Houses of Congress.

Section 3.
Whenever the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that he is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, and until he transmits to them a written declaration to the contrary, such powers and duties shall be discharged by the Vice President as Acting President.

Section 4.
Whenever the Vice President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive departments or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President shall immediately assume the powers and duties of the office as Acting President.

Thereafter, when the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that no inability exists, he shall resume the powers and duties of his office unless the Vice President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive department or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit within four days to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office. Thereupon Congress shall decide the issue, assembling within forty-eight hours for that purpose if not in session. If the Congress, within twenty-one days after receipt of the latter written declaration, or, if Congress is not in session, within twenty-one days after Congress is required to assemble, determines by two-thirds vote of both Houses that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President shall continue to discharge the same as Acting President; otherwise, the President shall resume the powers and duties of his office.


AMENDMENT XXVI
Passed by Congress March 23, 1971. Ratified July 1, 1971.

Note: Amendment 14, section 2, of the Constitution was modified by section 1 of the 26th amendment.

Section 1.
The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age.

Section 2.
The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.


AMENDMENT XXVII
Originally proposed Sept. 25, 1789. Ratified May 7, 1992.

No law, varying the compensation for the services of the Senators and Representatives, shall take effect, until an election of representatives shall have intervened.

The Constitution: Amendments 11 - 27
edit on 12/8/11 by ThePublicEnemyNo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 04:54 PM
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Thanks for taking the time to create this thread...a lot of good information..I am still reading through it.

I am thinking.....if I don't like the candidates running for President.....I can always do a write-in vote.



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 05:25 PM
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I'm with caladonea, I have a sick feeling that I will be writing in my vote in the next election.
From there we will see how the popular vote splits from the electoral college.
If the split is too bad, we may considering practicing some democracy in this republik.
Democracy is, 200 sheepdogs and a wolf deciding who is gonna get through the wire.
edit on 8-12-2011 by g146541 because: bad spellar



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 06:22 PM
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reply to post by caladonea
 


You're welcome


Ya know...I've just been thinking a lot lately about the next election. It just seems like we're headed for a bigger disaster than the one we are currently in "IF", we're not careful. To be quite honest, for the first time in my life, I have found myself to be scared of what's ahead...and I mean that with the utmost sincerity.

Obama came outta' nowhere on the heels of Bush and just made everyone feel good, or at least I personally liked what his campaign was about at the time. I've since realized that I did not do my due diligence before running to the polls and punching the tiny black mark next to his name and I did the same thing when we here in California recalled Governor Gray Davis, when I voted for Arnold Schwartzeneggar (or however you spell it). I was so ready to see a change after Bush left office, that I just fell for everything Obama said without giving proper thought to what he was saying or even doing a "background check" so to speak.

Never again! I mean it. If the candidate I want right now turns out to be a piece of crap before election day, then I will be writing in my vote.

Thank you for taking the time to read.
edit on 12/8/11 by ThePublicEnemyNo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 06:25 PM
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Originally posted by g146541
I'm with caladonea, I have a sick feeling that I will be writing in my vote in the next election.
From there we will see how the popular vote splits from the electoral college.
If the split is too bad, we may considering practicing some democracy in this republik.
Democracy is, 200 sheepdogs and a wolf deciding who is gonna get through the wire.
edit on 8-12-2011 by g146541 because: bad spellar


I too agree with you both. The electoral college in my opinion is really the thorn in our side and I think we need to get rid of it honestly. It seems to be the reason we can't get a decent election.

We will see come November 2012. Thank you for reading



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 06:31 PM
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Voting is for suckers. Maybe in some wonderful fairy tale land the rules have not been manipulated, bought and subverted, your vote actually means something. But in this world, the fix is in.

Except on a very basic local level (i.e., the level that doesn't matter), all you get are a few very limited choices bought and paid for by organizations you can't imagine and certainly can't influence, and they're all primed to keep things just the way those organizations want them to be kept.

This includes your favorite "alternative" candidate, who you so charmingly, naively believe will bring some new brand of honesty and truth to the mix and run the crooked bastards out of town on a rail. Yeah. Right.

Enjoy your ignorance while you can, I suppose. It's not all that fun to wake up to reality.


edit on 8-12-2011 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 10:21 PM
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reply to post by ThePublicEnemyNo1
 
and this why it's nearly impossible for us as "the people" to fix the problems that need fixing there have been so many ratifications and admendments that you can't keep anything straight and the average person who works a full time job and has kids it would take yrs to make heads or tails of any of this stuff I get so frustrated when I try to read ANY of the bills (past and present) that have gone through congress and the senate because theres so much "fluff" that it's hard to get to the actual point although I do want to thank you for posting this because reguardless of how easy it is to read and understand it is important to make an effort if you want to have a hand at changing things
so I give you a



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 10:57 PM
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Amendment III

No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.


I really think this needs to be the topic of the next debate.

You never hear anyone state what their position is on it...I really think we need to get it straight what all the candidates think about this.



posted on Dec, 16 2011 @ 05:02 PM
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Originally posted by Blue Shift
Voting is for suckers. Maybe in some wonderful fairy tale land the rules have not been manipulated, bought and subverted, your vote actually means something. But in this world, the fix is in.

Except on a very basic local level (i.e., the level that doesn't matter), all you get are a few very limited choices bought and paid for by organizations you can't imagine and certainly can't influence, and they're all primed to keep things just the way those organizations want them to be kept.

This includes your favorite "alternative" candidate, who you so charmingly, naively believe will bring some new brand of honesty and truth to the mix and run the crooked bastards out of town on a rail. Yeah. Right.

Enjoy your ignorance while you can, I suppose. It's not all that fun to wake up to reality.


edit on 8-12-2011 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)


While I thank you for your insight and contribution, I can not thank you for declaring me or anyone else who has chosen to "stand up" ignorant. With all due respect, I understand that we have a "crippled affect" regarding political policy. However, that does not mean that at any point in time do we sit by in a "hypnotic trance" and watch our rights as US citizens and human beings get flung out the window by booger picking snobs (TPTB)!

I am fully awake and maybe when you wake up, you can join the rest of us who seek nothing other than equal rights and the freedom to simply exist and build our future. We are not all sleeping!

Again, thank you or contributing


ETA:
I don't understand where the "fairytales" come into play, unless that's how you view justice and equality.
edit on 12/16/11 by ThePublicEnemyNo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 16 2011 @ 05:13 PM
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Originally posted by RN311
reply to post by ThePublicEnemyNo1
 
and this why it's nearly impossible for us as "the people" to fix the problems that need fixing there have been so many ratifications and admendments that you can't keep anything straight and the average person who works a full time job and has kids it would take yrs to make heads or tails of any of this stuff I get so frustrated when I try to read ANY of the bills (past and present) that have gone through congress and the senate because theres so much "fluff" that it's hard to get to the actual point although I do want to thank you for posting this because reguardless of how easy it is to read and understand it is important to make an effort if you want to have a hand at changing things
so I give you a


I commend you for at least taking the first step in "recognizing" this importance. Does it really matter how long it takes to understand your Bill of Rights and all of the "fluff" that goes along with it?

I ask you this as a challenge. At what point in time do you challenge yourself, family and friends to understand what and why you're all fighting (if you're fighting) for? Not what "appears" to be politically correct, but what each and every one of us "owe" every human being in existence.

We as a people, need some serious reconditioning....the type of conditioning that starts from within with an understanding of what "We" want as a human being. I am not to be bought or sold...I am not to be wagered upon...this is not a race, this is a marathon. If "We" all really take the time (I know it will take a lot of time but....) to understand what "Our" rights are as a US citizen you have more than two legs to stand on...you have millions!

Thank you again for your contribution and I hope you take the time to get to know your Bill of Rights


ETA:
Notice the "We" in regards to "Us"? It's not about "Me" or "You"...it's about "Us, United" and our future.
edit on 12/16/11 by ThePublicEnemyNo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 16 2011 @ 05:16 PM
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Originally posted by RN311
reply to post by ThePublicEnemyNo1
 
and this why it's nearly impossible for us as "the people" to fix the problems that need fixing


Not much my dear is "IMPOSSIBLE", especially fighting for what's right for you and your family. Scary...yes, but impossible, I would have to say no way!

edit on 12/16/11 by ThePublicEnemyNo1 because: (no reason given)






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