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posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 09:15 PM
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Originally posted by MrsBlonde
water of life is a big deal in Sumerian religious thought
Water of life is interchangeable with semen by the way, Sumerians made no distinction between water and semen

it's obviously part of an 'anointing' set, the bucket /Louis Vi-ton /receptacle ,and the thing in the other hand which is dipped in the bucket contents and then sprinkled on something (which changes it's nature)and makes it Holy.


That's very interesting. I think it's also part of an 'anointing'. In some of the depictions, it looks like crystal dna around the figures.




posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 09:52 PM
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Bucket and Cone - In Neo-Assyrian art, objects resembling a pine cone and bucket (or occasionally a bucket alone) are held as attributes by a number of protective genies, often in association with the stylised tree. The cone is held up in the right hand, the bucket held down in the left. Only very rarely are these held by figurines which might be considered purely human, almost always they were held by genies or animal/human hybrids. As well as in front of the stylised tree, the bucket and cone are seen held before floral decorative emblems, guardian supernatural creatures, the king or his attendants, or open doorways. The cone has been interpreted as a fir cone, as the male flower of a date palm, or a clay imitation of one of these. The bucket has been thought to have been of metal or wicker, and to have contained either water or pollen. Written sources on the subject are few, but it seems clear that the bucket and cone were associated with purification, for they are known respectively as bandaddu (bucket) and mullilu (purifier) and figurines of these genies holding these were found among the types placed within buildings for protection from malevolent demons and disease.


www.chronofus.net...



edit on 5-10-2011 by Onboard2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 10:39 AM
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I sent this image off to an expert in such things this is his reply


.....firstly, the item when carried by the bird headed figures is a bucket of water, they are depicted sprinkling water (symbolically the water of life upon the tree of life) with a pine cone. Theres a few words that cover such an item, mašlium and ešla, a plain bucket, buniĝ a bucket or bowl associated with water or mašlum a leather bucket, the bird headed figures iirc are Neo Assyrian, from the palace of Sargon II or one of his line as they were only popular in art for about 150 years around 900bce

The other use for a bucket, was as a container of provisions, see lacking things like cling film or carrier bags the geniuses in mesopotamia figured that a leather bucket was ideal for carrying food on a long journey, because it was insulated, waterproof and easy to handle, so they carried both food and drink in leather containers on journeys (either buckets, bags or water skins), this wasn't just them, but pretty much every ancient culture made use of the same idea, thats why you also see quetzlcoatl with a bucket, it became used in art to symbolize a sacred journey,


heres a few lines from Lugalbanda in the mountain cave which details the usage

Quote:



They set out for him the various fats of the cowpen, the sheepfold's fresh cheese, oil with cold eggs, cold hard-boiled eggs, as if laying a table for the holy place, the valued place (i.e. as if for a funerary offering). Directly in front of the table they arranged for him beer for drinking, mixed with date syrup and rolls ...... with butter. Provisions poured into leather buckets, provisions all put into leather bags -- his brothers and friends, like a boat unloading from the harvest-place, placed stores by his head in the mountain cave.
they were preparing for Lugabanda, grave goods as he'd just died, hence sacred again, like the usage by the bird headed priests, sacred


so at best in english you'd call them "sacred buckets", or probably better, just as "bucket"



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


The bucket of water explanation is also for the mesoamerican relief too?
edit on 6-10-2011 by Walkswithfist because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 11:04 AM
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reply to post by Walkswithfist
 


Just to the original image. However in the reply he noted the use of such skin carrying containers is common across cultures. I've seen similar leather/skin bags, some lined with clay or having a piece of pottery in them for carrying stuff in other cultures.

Humans faced with the same problem often come out with the same solution even if separated by space and time



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 11:37 AM
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Since those buckets are usually only in the hands of deities or winged beings, could they be a representation of Enki or EA and the ABZU, which is the fresh water. Are they showing that the gods created mankind with the sacred water or semen and their own DNA?



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 12:01 PM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


mblahnikluver excellent question my friend
. Seems like a container for gifts maybe the pine cone things were in there. I like the timers on the wrist also.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


mblahnikluver excellent question my friend
. Seems like a container for gifts maybe the pine cone things were in there. I like the timers on the wrist also.


Looks like bracelets to me, but then I'm a radical and don't believe that people from that time period would wear two time keepers, one on each wrist.
edit on 6/10/11 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 03:58 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune

Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


mblahnikluver excellent question my friend
. Seems like a container for gifts maybe the pine cone things were in there. I like the timers on the wrist also.


Looks like bracelets to me, but then I'm a radical and don't believe that people from that time period would wear two time keepers, one on each wrist.


I'm with you on that one, Hans. I think that in Mesopotamia, they had only one time zone and they were one of the few cultures that didn't recognize daylight savings time (barbarians!) so why would a guy need two watches?

Much more likely to be Dick-Tracy two-way wrist radios. That's an old comic strip and we're talking about an old culture. Seems to match.

Harte



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 04:04 PM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


Looks a like a man's pretty purse to me



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 09:02 PM
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I think it's much more then merely picking fruits or collecting water. In ancient Egypt they have resembling pictures of Thoth near a similair tree of life. In some pictures he insert's an Ankh, or the 'symbol of life'.

I found a couple of pictures resembling Egypt and Sumer involving the tree of life, do you want to see them?



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 08:33 AM
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Originally posted by Onboard2
Since those buckets are usually only in the hands of deities or winged beings, could they be a representation of Enki or EA and the ABZU, which is the fresh water. Are they showing that the gods created mankind with the sacred water or semen and their own DNA?

No.

The reliefs show what was stated earlier, what we today know as "genies" or "the D'jinn."

In Akkadian, they are the Apkallu. (Sumerian - Abgal.)

AKA The "Seven Sages" or "Seven Wise Men."

They brought knowledge to mankind, sort of like Prometheus and fire, only without angering the gods, since it was their idea.

Harte



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 08:57 AM
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Originally posted by Harte

Originally posted by Onboard2
Since those buckets are usually only in the hands of deities or winged beings, could they be a representation of Enki or EA and the ABZU, which is the fresh water. Are they showing that the gods created mankind with the sacred water or semen and their own DNA?

No.

The reliefs show what was stated earlier, what we today know as "genies" or "the D'jinn."

In Akkadian, they are the Apkallu. (Sumerian - Abgal.)

AKA The "Seven Sages" or "Seven Wise Men."

They brought knowledge to mankind, sort of like Prometheus and fire, only without angering the gods, since it was their idea.

Harte


Abgal (Apkallu) Seven Sumerian spirits deriving from the Abzu and subject to Enki.
Manfred Lurker

same as the seven rishis with the seventh manu in the bahitra of vishnu



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 09:04 AM
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Originally posted by Klassified
I covered this item in another post M. It might be helpful to you. Blood/Water of life Bucket.
www.abovetopsecret.com...

ETA: There's also a link in my post with more info. The cone also signifies deity, and represents the third eye, or pineal gland.
ETA2: I think "bandaddu" is the Sumerian word for this bucket. But I'm not 100% on that.
edit on 10/5/2011 by Klassified because: (no reason given)


Awesome! Yup that is it.

Another member used the term "bandaddu" as well but I only got one hit via google with it. It's used in more than Sumerian pics so I was just curious as to why so many have it.

I have been looking for the Egyptian statue that has one figure holding this item but no luck! I saw it on AA's a while ago and recently noticed it in other texts.

Thanks for the link too!



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 09:07 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Very cool! Thanks



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 09:09 AM
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Originally posted by Reignite
I think it's much more then merely picking fruits or collecting water. In ancient Egypt they have resembling pictures of Thoth near a similair tree of life. In some pictures he insert's an Ankh, or the 'symbol of life'.

I found a couple of pictures resembling Egypt and Sumer involving the tree of life, do you want to see them?



Yes!! Please share


It might be the pics Im looking for but can't find cause I don't know the name of the deity or pharaoh that was holding it.



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 09:29 AM
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Originally posted by Parta

Originally posted by Harte

Originally posted by Onboard2
Since those buckets are usually only in the hands of deities or winged beings, could they be a representation of Enki or EA and the ABZU, which is the fresh water. Are they showing that the gods created mankind with the sacred water or semen and their own DNA?

No.

The reliefs show what was stated earlier, what we today know as "genies" or "the D'jinn."

In Akkadian, they are the Apkallu. (Sumerian - Abgal.)

AKA The "Seven Sages" or "Seven Wise Men."

They brought knowledge to mankind, sort of like Prometheus and fire, only without angering the gods, since it was their idea.

Harte


Abgal (Apkallu) Seven Sumerian spirits deriving from the Abzu and subject to Enki.
Manfred Lurker

same as the seven rishis with the seventh manu in the bahitra of vishnu


Yes, and also similar to the "Seven Sages" tales from ancient Greece, except the Greek one involved (presumably) actual people that really existed.

But the concept of "seven sages" can be thought of as a possible link between these cultures.

Harte
edit on 10/7/2011 by Harte because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 09:29 AM
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never mind was wrong about the egyptian thing
edit on 7-10-2011 by Tobree because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 09:31 AM
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Originally posted by Tobree
Wouldn't egyptians have used vases to carry things? if you look at other hyroglifics they don't usually have what we no as buckets just throwing that out there. so i don't think it's a bucket. on a less serious note it looks like a handbag and he's mincing

LOL

Did someone post a pic of an Egyptian carving showing one of these things?

All I saw were Assyrian and Mesoamerican.

Harte



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 09:32 AM
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My bad i skimmed through the thread and saw someone mention egypt and the head guard looked egyptian. sorry






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