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Blazars look different from different telescopes?

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posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 04:10 PM
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i found a new NASA release that is very interesting to me,

Ground- and space-based telescopes have detected blazars, but there is almost no overlap in the blazars they detect," notes GLAST Deputy Project Scientist Julie McEnery of NASA Goddard. "Clearly, each type of telescope is seeing a different type of object."


and i found this bit interesting as well...

Moreover, the LAT will investigate a curious discrepancy between EGRET and results from several ground-based observatories, including the Whipple Observatory in Arizona. EGRET detected low-energy gamma rays from blazars, whereas Whipple has discovered high-energy TeV-level gamma rays. "Ground- and space-based telescopes have detected blazars, but there is almost no overlap in the blazars they detect," notes GLAST Deputy Project Scientist Julie McEnery of NASA Goddard. "Clearly, each type of telescope is seeing a different type of object."


NASA source


Microscoping is a phenomenon that effects more than just the optical range of wave lengths, very small wavelength/amplitude emittions are subject to microscoping. In practice, this creates a shift in physical frequencies and light agitates the atoms in the density refractive medium, very small frequencies can be “amplified” by the hype state of the atom-to-atom photon exchange. Sub mm heat in a very dense medium is “radiated” outwards into an ever-decreasing medium density/gravity environment which coincidentally alters the optical density and refractivity in a co-efficient manner.
Depending on, angle of incidence and medium density of host and observed lenses, the distance between the lenses, the gravitational lensing potential and if either lens is increasing/decreasing in aera/curvature
The different telescopes have a different “eye lens effect” simply their individual focal interaction is different and so interacts or couples with the “observed” object in the specific manner of the design and or size. This is dependent on the increase/decrease of medium density/gravity of the medium the telescope is in and the style design size of the individual telescopes.
The individual telescopes must be thought of as the eye piece in a much larger space based telescope formed from gravitational lensing potential of the host and observed galaxies.

source xploder


xploder

any one else think this is an interesting and strange phenomonon?
edit on 23-8-2011 by XPLodER because: spelling

edit on 23-8-2011 by XPLodER because: source tags




posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 04:31 PM
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That isn't really surprising since the atmosphere is very good at absorbing gamma rays. That's why GLAST will be up there. EGRET detected objects which ground based observatories cannot.
amazing-space.stsci.edu...
What is intriguing to the scientists is that there are different types of blazars. Some seem to emit only high energy gamma and some only low energy gamma.

How you make a connection to gravitational lensing or your "density lensing" theory I have no idea but it doesn't surprise me.



edit on 8/23/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


i must be a bit confused then


Ground- and space-based telescopes have detected blazars, but there is almost no overlap in the blazars they detect," notes GLAST Deputy Project Scientist Julie McEnery of NASA Goddard. "Clearly, each type of telescope is seeing a different type of object."



Moreover, the LAT will investigate a curious discrepancy between EGRET and results from several ground-based

NASA source


Moreover, the LAT will investigate a curious discrepancy between EGRET and results from several ground-based observatories, including the Whipple Observatory in Arizona. EGRET detected low-energy gamma rays from blazars, whereas Whipple has discovered high-energy TeV-level gamma rays.


nasa source,

if this was expected why is it descibed as a discrepancy?
and does the earths atmosphere block enough gamma rays to make observation change from low energy gamma to TeV level gamma? because the effect of the earths atmoshere would be responcable?

please could you explain it clearly to me?




xploder



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


hehe
not surprised i have used gravitational lensing or not surprised by the gamma discrepencies?

How you make a connection to gravitational lensing or your "density lensing" theory I have no idea but it doesn't surprise me.

xploder



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 

The discrepancy is that the low energy gamma sources detected by EGRET did not correspond with the high energy sources detected by Whipple. It was expected that the surface based observations would match. Instead, it was found that low energy sources detected by EGRET could not be seen by Whipple. Leading to the statement:

"Clearly, each type of telescope is seeing a different type of object."

The detectors are not seeing the same objects differently, they are not seeing the same objects.


The atmosphere does not cause a change in gamma rays energy levels. Only the high energy levels were able to penetrate the atmosphere to be detected by surface observatories.


edit on 8/23/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 05:37 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by XPLodER
 

The discrepancy is that the low energy gamma sources detected by EGRET did not correspond with the high energy sources detected by Whipple. It was expected that the surface based observations would match. Instead, it was found that low energy sources detected by EGRET could not be seen by Whipple. Leading to the statement:

"Clearly, each type of telescope is seeing a different type of object."

The detectors are not seeing the same objects differently, they are not seeing the same objects.


The atmosphere does not cause a change in gamma rays energy levels. Only the high energy levels were able to penetrate the atmosphere to be detected by surface observatories.


edit on 8/23/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)

so ground based telescopes are finding different low energy gamma sources than the space telescopes which are finding different sources that are "high energy gamma ray" in the TeV range?

do the space based telescopes also "locate" lower energy gamma ray sources?
and are they the same sources as the ground stations have located?

and could both ground and space telescopes give a comparitive "loss" to account for the atmosphere?
if trained on the same object?

so is this a case of detection of events rather than observation?

xploder



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


i must admit i am glad you cleared that up as i was thinking this descepency would have some interesting elements to be solved and anything that i dont quite understand ATS usually has the answers
so thanks PHAGE


i must have misinterpreted the article
glad you cleared that up or i would have wasted alot of time looking for a reason

xploder



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 02:07 AM
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Without looking into the specifics of which telescope is finding what I can only speculate. I did have the thought that there may be some refraction caused by the atmosphere which is responsible for this miss match of data. With the magnetosphere deflecting a lot of the gamma rays, a weaker signal from ground based telescopes compared to space based ones is reasonable. I am not sure where the space based telescopes sit in relation to the magnetosphere so they may be subject to some distortion as well compared to a telescope in deep space.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 02:10 AM
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reply to post by kwakakev
 

Electromagnetic radiation (including gamma rays) is not affected by the magnetosphere. But, depending on its wavelength, it can be affected by the atmosphere.



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 04:48 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


In trying to find out why this information is not matching up I would not be too quick in dismissing the magnetosphere. While the magnetosphere does not absorb gamma energy like the lower atmosphere does there are still some affects going on including:

1. Wave injection effects that have been demonstrated by HARRP experiments carbon.ucdenver.edu... . While these experiments where done with ELF / VLF frequencies, it does show the capabilities of the magnetosphere to bend electromagnetic radiation.

2. Kerr Effect en.wikipedia.org... . This demonstrates that the refractive index does change with an applied magnetic field. While some compounds present this effect much stronger than others, all materials have been shown to exhibit this quality.

3. Faraday Effect en.wikipedia.org... . An applied magnetic field does change the polarisation of the electromagnetic radiation.

I would not be surprised if the heliosphere is also causing some distortions as well to the universe we see as the charged solar winds are contained from the neutral interstellar space.



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