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Let’s talk about Knifes…

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posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 03:42 PM
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Originally posted by Daedal
Stainless steel blades suck big...


Stainless has it's place as does high carbon steel. The Mora 510 comes in both so if you need an ultra sharp blade and you know how to sharpen then you can choose high carbon steel. If you are in an environment that requires the durability and corrosion resistance of SS then there is that too. One thing about Mora, they certainly know how to provide a high quality metal.




posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 03:54 PM
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Originally posted by dainoyfb
Read several survival books, watch survival instructionals and you will start to notice a trend in the images. That is that most instructors teaching bushcraft are wearing a Mora 510 around their neck. This is because the mora is a time proven, nearly indestructible knife which is perfectly fitted to the job and, oh yeah... it cost $10.



edit on 22-8-2011 by dainoyfb because: I typo'd.



PS. Thanks for the thread DB.



edit on 22-8-2011 by dainoyfb because: I added the PS.



The result is an excellent tool which does not break easily, holds its edge well, and can cut even wrought iron and softer steel.
WIki

I saw that and said.."whoa!" out loud. Thanks deeply for this info! Been searching ATS threads for knife knowledge and which qualities I need to be looking for before I buy.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 05:39 PM
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Originally posted by Asktheanimals
Damascus is pretty but not as functional as other steels



Im not sure you understand what Damascus steel is.
The original Damascus steel, was "Wootz" steel.
It's characteristics made it legendary, alas we cannot make it today because the tech is lost

The newer "Damascus" steel is actually Pattern welded steel.
Quality pattern welded steels use two or more steels that would be great blade steels on their own.
1095 +15n is most common, and small sheets are stacked, welded, forged, and folded.
the carbon precipitates leaving layers that show when acid dipped.
the different carbon contents of the steels in the layers add a micro serration effect to the edge, allowing it to cut better and stay useable longer than standard high carbon blades.

Just ask the Japanese how well folded steel works.
Japanese folded steel blades are considered some of the best ever made.


Moras are great knives for the money.
however, if you are willing to spend more than $20 on a knife you might bet your life on you can find much better quality blades.


Military issue blades are the cheapest functional blade available in mass lots to fill large govt. orders.. not even close to the best quality.
No govt will spend $200 per blade for every soldier.
Many soldiers carry their own blades over a Govt issue beater.




edit on 22-8-2011 by BadNinja68 because: add info



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 07:05 PM
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Thanks again DB, another great thread.

I have a Swiss Army in my pocket all the time. If we're out in the boonies I have a Kurki as well as a Buck 110 lock back. For hunting I still swear by the Buck Skinner probably because that's the one I learned on. And a sharping tool. A old (OK ancient) Nordic Repalla Filet knife when I go fishing. And yes you really can clean and filet a big tuna with one.

When the SHTF I'll go back to the ones from Nam, a Stone "A" model and the Randall #1. Plus I still have a pair of push daggers.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 10:20 PM
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Nice info. Thanks a bunch DB. Do you have any idea what this knife is intended for?



It was my fathers and he died before he could pass a lot of his knowledge, in many areas, on to me. Let me know if the link doesn't work, I don't really know how to insert pictures



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 10:29 PM
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Here's a couple of custom "Damascus" Tracker knives.
Pattern welded steel is one of the rare times "Art" is truely extremely functional.
These are mine and my wife's.
Mine has a walnut handle, hers has linen micarta with brass bolsters.
I did notice the pic makes mine look alot nicer than it is.. hehe it's been abuse a bit more than it looks.
The spine is 1/4 inch thick, 9.5 inches overall length.

The pattern or "grain" runs all the way through the steel.
Just ordered a sweet custom horizontal sheath for mine with all the fixin's..sharpening rod holder, multi-tool pocket, etc.. should be here in a week or two, and I'll definitely be posting pix


These are used, workable knives, built for abuse and not meant to be set on a shelf.
They are also legal to carry on the waist in my state.



I have a few other nice blades, and now that I figured out how to post a pic I'll snap a few more.







lets see if this works
edit on 22-8-2011 by BadNinja68 because: pix

edit on 22-8-2011 by BadNinja68 because: redo pix



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 10:45 PM
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reply to post by BadNinja68
 


Works, your good. How durable would those knives be? As I understand it many knives like that are just ornamental.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 10:59 PM
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reply to post by JDBlack
 



Extremely durable.
This isnt a pretty printed pattern like some ebay knives.

This is 1/4 inch thick folded high carbon steel.
Folded like a Katana, and differentially hardened.
These weren't cheap.
They are made from specifically15n20 high carbon steel folded with 1095 high carbon steel, folded to over 600 layers.
Both steels used are high carbon, and would make great blades however one has more carbon than the other.
When the layers of steel are melted together, folded and flattened, the different levels opf carbon percipitate into bands.
When the knifemaker grinds the blade, polishes and then dips it in acid, the pattern becomes visable.
I can polish it mirrior shiny, soak it in vinegar overnight, and the pattern will come back.
when used, the different carbon steels wear a bit different;y, leaving microscopic serrations that aid in cutting.

The numbered limited edition official Damascus TOPS TB trackers like this sell for 2 grand.
This is not one of those...lol Those are for rich collectors.
The pair I have didnt cost anywhere near that much.



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 11:05 PM
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reply to post by BadNinja68
 


Ok, thanks just wonderin. They are beautiful knives, and the style is one I like, I just get a bit nervous seing blades like that, as they can also just be over priced peices of eye candy, as opposed to useful knives.
edit on 22-8-2011 by JDBlack because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 11:18 PM
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reply to post by JDBlack
 


So true.
The official TOPS Tom Brown trackers like this sell for over $200.
they are good knives, but overpriced.
1095 steel, but thin and weak at the tip.

Dave beck designed this style along with Tom Brown, and Dave made the first ones himself.

Tom and Dave had differences and Dave lost the lawsuit over the name to Tom, and called his the Beck WSK knife.
The Beck knives are handmade, numbered collector Items that sell for $500-1500 now that Dave no longer makes them.

You can find a nice Red Scorpion Six SK for about $350 ish if you look, they are designed by Dave Beck.

Mine are handmade copies of the Beck version, but a bit smaller for easier carry.



BTW, I just like this style for myself, I dont think this is the "best" survival knife by any means, it's just one option.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 12:18 AM
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Any knife with the proper blade shape that will take a good edge works for skinning. Hell, I've skinned deer with kitchen knives, my Swiss Army knife, the blade from a Leatherman, and even a box cutter once. It's nice to have the proper tools, but it's good to practice with the wrong ones just in case. In my experience, thinner blades are great for skinning. A cheap filet knife will work wonders and it's great for deboning as well.

The Bark River Knife and Tool Bravo1 is the best general purpose camping/survival knife I have found. There are others that are good knives but the Bark River is phenomenal. ESEE makes a great knife and for a cheaper option the Becker BK1 is a good sturdy blade. Generally, any knife designed as a "fighting knife" will make a less than ideal survival knife. This includes the extremely popular Gerber LMF II, the venerable KaBar, and many others that people tend to buy because they're tacticool and the military uses them. Ironically, the Bravo1 was designed for Marine Recon because they knew that knives generally aren't used for fighting and any knife designed for such can't handle a lot of abuse.

Camping/survival really calls for 3 cutting tools: a midsize fixed blade like the Bravo1, a smaller fixed blade for finer work like skinning small game, and a multitool for obvious reasons.

Good tools make all the difference in the world. If you've ever been disappointed by your gear on a normal outing, imagine if your life depended on whatever task was at hand. You don't have to spend a fortune to get good knives, you just have to know what you're looking for and real world experience with your gear will teach you what works and what doesn't. It surprises me how many people buy up a lot of survival gear and never test it. They just expect it all to work whenever they need it.




edit on 23-8-2011 by Decision because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 08:59 AM
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Originally posted by JDBlack
Nice info. Thanks a bunch DB. Do you have any idea what this knife is intended for?



It was my fathers and he died before he could pass a lot of his knowledge, in many areas, on to me. Let me know if the link doesn't work, I don't really know how to insert pictures

I couldnt get the link to work for me....
to post photos in a threadf you need a media account...
up on the top look for the buttom the reads tools... click that and look for a link that says pictures...
follow that and it will guide you through how to upload photos



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 09:11 AM
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Originally posted by crappiekat
reply to post by DaddyBare
 


On one of our fishing trips up north I found this really cool stick. When I saw it I immediatly thought " Walking stick" I have seen people whittle them down and they are beautiful. I was wondering if you could recommend a good whittle knife.


You can get fancy and they do make speciality whittling/wood carving knives...
But me, I'm and old timer I like things simple and they don't come any simpler that an Junior Stockman Old Timer Knife



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 09:19 AM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 


cheesey vid but...that particular knife saved my life recently...wet or dry the handle is very grippy...

Ended up hung up in a root wad, while floating...and had one of them, vest type fishing vests on, had to cut it off under water...works great holds a good edge...may need to repost vid


As for my (gentlemans knife) the one I always carry....I like this...


edit on 23-8-2011 by Doc Holiday because: damn OCD and blank boxs

edit on 23-8-2011 by Doc Holiday because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 09:25 AM
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reply to post by Doc Holiday
 


I never had a lot of experience with the cold steel line... I guess you love yours????
I guess you recent misadventure is just more proof a knifeless man is a lifeless man...

still you gave me an idea... you and I should put together a thread on water survival...Being born and raised in the Rockies I got the whitewater survival down... maybe you can cover the other parts...???

Glad your Okay bud



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 09:27 AM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 


I'll add what I can ..Im workin 60 hours a week now...so it would be limited...
thanks DB for the great threads again
But yeah you can say I love my Cold Steel knife....
edit on 23-8-2011 by Doc Holiday because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 09:36 AM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 


that's a really nice knife. yeah, I don't throw survival knives, unless it would be necessary, they're not balanced for that really, but yeah, you can throw it, and sink it in a target if you have too.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 09:36 AM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 


Thank you for your reply. I will look into the "Old Timer" Since I have posted I tried to do alittle whittling with my sons old boy scout knife. I have found it not to be very sharp. Also the blade seems to thin to me. I guess I'm just not comfortable with it. I think I may be not liking the feel of it in my hand. I have small slender hands.

Thanks for this thread, I have even learned more than I was expecting. Will be following this thread.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 11:26 AM
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Old Timer knives, along with Uncle Henry Knives are Made By Schrade.n ( or were)
The Schrade Factory Closed.
They were good US Made knives ( now they are made in China, But still use tempered 440c steel).

They are still available, they are very good, inexpensive stainless steel blades that werre designed for use.
My Father carried a 150OT for years



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 12:20 PM
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Originally posted by BadNinja68
Old Timer knives, along with Uncle Henry Knives are Made By Schrade.n ( or were)
The Schrade Factory Closed.
They were good US Made knives ( now they are made in China, But still use tempered 440c steel).

They are still available, they are very good, inexpensive stainless steel blades that werre designed for use.
My Father carried a 150OT for years



I didn't know Schrade was gone....
In that case I no longer recommend the Old Timer or Uncle Henry Line of knives... unless you can find one of the old ones like I have...



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