Can You Identify this Plant? [Plant ID Project]

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posted on Apr, 14 2011 @ 08:58 PM
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reply to post by Elostone
 


YAY!! We have a winner! Good job, Elostone! Now for some info on this wonderful herb:



Current use of plantain is the commercially significant extraction of its mucilage – a carbohydrate fiber that is used in gentle laxatives. Ironically, plantain infusions can be used to halt diarrhea. Mucilage also acts as an appetite suppressant and reduces intestinal absorption of fat and bile. It reduces LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood. Plantain is commonly used as an astringent; its juice, when rubbed on an insect bite or bee sting, immediately sooths the area and begin the healing process. Plantain may also stop poison ivy from blistering and itching if applied to the skin immediately after contact. Plantain is still considered a diuretic; in addition, it is used as an expectorant and decongestant. It is also thought to sooth the throat and is taken to relieve laryngitis. Finally, when chewed, plantain acts as a breath freshener. If eaten early enough in the spring, plantain leaves are said to make a tasty cooked vegetable dish.


And that linky Plantain

okay, who's next??




posted on Apr, 14 2011 @ 09:20 PM
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OK, here is one!




posted on Apr, 14 2011 @ 10:05 PM
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reply to post by Elostone
 


Is that a mulberry of some kind? I was leaning toward sycamore, but it doesn't look just like our big sycamore out front. Who else has got a guess?!

Question: are those leaves fuzzy or glossy? I can't tell from the pic!! Thanx!
edit on 4/14/11 by jennybee35 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2011 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by jennybee35
 

Neither Mulberry or Sycamore... it is a common bush, often found as a weed in gardens and grows nearly everywhere in the Northern Hemisphere.
Here's a close-up:


ETA The leaves are not glossy at all, but not really fuzzy either. They are smooth but definitely not shiny
edit on 14-4-2011 by Elostone because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2011 @ 10:41 PM
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reply to post by Elostone
 


Is that a nasty old cocklebur?



posted on Apr, 14 2011 @ 11:05 PM
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reply to post by jennybee35
 

oh no... this is not nasty AT ALL!!!
(think wild spinach)
edit on 14-4-2011 by Elostone because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 15 2011 @ 05:45 AM
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and the answer is...
Lambs Quarter!


Lamb's quarter, is a wild relative of the spinach plant. It grows prolifically throughout most of the world. In fact, you probably have a good amount of it volunteering in your own garden starting in late spring.

This herb is one of the most nutritious wild foods you can eat.

One cup of raw lamb's quarter leaves contains:

~ 80 mg of Vitamin C
~ 11,600 IU of Vitamin A

~ 72 mg of Phosphorus

~ 309 mg of Calcium

as well as good amounts of

~ Thiamin

~ Riboflavin

~ Niacin

and

~ Iron

Link here:
www.herbalremediesinfo.com...

It is delicious, I might add!



posted on Apr, 15 2011 @ 11:52 AM
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Good deal!!!

Here's the Green Deane videos for those last two plants..




 


Here's one...




Verbascum thapsus aka Common Mullein

A very interesting write up on the Mullein can be found here: www.herbcraft.org...




edit on Sat, 16 Apr 2011 12:48:00 -0500 by JacKatMtn because: add pic and links



posted on Apr, 15 2011 @ 01:21 PM
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reply to post by JacKatMtn
 


Crap! You beat me to it, Kat! Ima post my pic too, maybe it'll be easier with double pics!




Oh, and just to make you envious
here is that pic of my peaches!



I am truly enjoying this, thanks for this thread!



posted on Apr, 15 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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reply to post by Elostone
 


Thanks, Elostone! I was ashamed to post the answer after you had to practically give it to me!!


I don't have any of the wild spinach here.
I sure wish I did after studying up on it. I might have to see about getting some seed from one of the seed co-ops online. I could always trade for wild plum or mulberry!



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 01:03 PM
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Here's a tree that you wouldn't want to climb



Gleditsia triacanthos aka Honey Locust

The thorns on this tree have been known to flatten the tires on farmer's tractors.. the live thorns are a bit flexible, but once they die they get incredibly strong, I wonder if they can be used as a needle for sewing hides and the like?

Here's a pic of last year's seedpods and the seeds.








edit on Mon, 18 Apr 2011 10:19:18 -0500 by JacKatMtn because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 03:22 PM
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Since it's been raining like crazy around here, I had the time to get a few more pics edited and uploaded..

Here's a couple of useful plants...


Stellaria media aka Common Chickweed
more info

 



Lamium purpureum aka Purple Deadnettle
more info





edit on Mon, 18 Apr 2011 10:14:56 -0500 by JacKatMtn because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2011 @ 07:09 PM
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Three unidentified flowering plants...




 


Muscari aka Grape Hyacinth
more info

 


Cardamine concatenata aka Cutleaf Toothwort
more info

Anyone recognize these?

2 of 3 identified...




edit on Mon, 18 Apr 2011 10:01:35 -0500 by JacKatMtn because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 17 2011 @ 07:24 AM
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Originally posted by JacKatMtn



 





Anyone recognize these?


This is a Grape Hyacinth.

Link to some info: Grape Hyacinth



posted on Apr, 17 2011 @ 07:40 AM
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Originally posted by JacKatMtn





Anyone recognize these?


It appears to match a picture I found of Cutleaf Toothwort (Dentaria laciniata)

More info: Cutleaf Toothwort



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 11:08 AM
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Thanks!! This project is going well so far, only one image unidentified.. I spent a couple of hours searching with no luck, but we have time...

Here's a couple more wild plants around here that someone might recognize.. I sure have no clue




 





posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 12:56 PM
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Originally posted by JacKatMtn
Thanks!! This project is going well so far, only one image unidentified.. I spent a couple of hours searching with no luck, but we have time...




I found this photo of a plant resembling the one you posted above. It is called Curly Dock:




posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 02:15 PM
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Originally posted by JacKatMtn
Thanks!! This project is going well so far, only one image unidentified.. I spent a couple of hours searching with no luck, but we have time...




Looks like Hounds Tongue (Cynoglossum Officinale)

nativeplants.files.wordpress.com...

Considered a noxious weed in the USA
A relative of Comfrey, Hound's Tongue should not be taken internally as it contains alkaloids that can cause liver failure. It has medicinal uses when used externally, however. The leaves can be made into salves useful for burns, wounds and inflammations of the skin. Has similar uses as Comfrey and is often used in place of Comfrey by herbalists.
www.whitman.wsu.edu...



posted on Apr, 18 2011 @ 02:47 PM
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Originally posted by jennybee35
reply to post by JacKatMtn
 


I don't think this is henbit. At the bottom of the linked page is this:





Don’t confuse henbit with Glechoma hederacea, right, which has much larger flowers


On the plus side, wiki says it is a tasty salad green of the mint family, also! We have both types of plants, and I am betting you do, too!


That is a photo of Ground Ivy (Glecoma Hederacea) aka- Creeping Charlie
Indeed in the Mint Family!
Some cases of toxicity in horses has been documented, but edible in moderation.
Medicinally, it has astringent and expectorant qualities and was used to treat respiratory ailments such as bronchitis, pneumonia and coughs.



posted on Apr, 19 2011 @ 10:53 AM
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reply to post by GoneGrey
 


There seems to be many varieties of this family of plants, I did a quick look around the property and there were a few of last year's seed stalks still around and they look much like the images found on the web concerning the curly dock id..

I am going to keep an eye out on this one and see if we can't positively ID it in the near future.





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