Can You Identify this Plant? [Plant ID Project]

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posted on May, 29 2012 @ 11:54 AM
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I can see this tree over the fence, it's a small one (about garden fence height) and looks really cool.
It has a short trunk going up to its canopy, not sure if it's been cut to be like that or what!
Anyone know what it is?

Pic showing height and size in environment



Zoomed in more pic to show more leaf detail.



Any takers?




posted on May, 29 2012 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by Vasteel
 


The leaves remind me of a peach tree... was my first thought.. my second thought was that looks to be a tree that has been shaped via pruning to grow that way?

Cool look, what region climatewise would you say that the tree is in? might help those who can give a better answer than mine


Thanks for sharing



posted on May, 29 2012 @ 01:06 PM
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reply to post by JacKatMtn
 


Thanks for the reply.
This is on the south coast of England, in Bournemouth, so not exactly a tropical climate but not freezing either, summers go to about 24-ish degrees celsius at an average high and winters down to -2ish on average with some odd days higher and lower obviously.

I shall google images up some peach trees to compare.



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 03:20 AM
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It looks like a very neatly trimmed and very healthy weeping cherry. Was it covered in blossom a couple of months back? Whatever it is I wish I had it in my garden.



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 11:26 AM
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reply to post by wigit
 


I don't remember seeing blossom, doesn't mean there wasn't any though

I've been able to see the tree for the whole of the year and am quite surprised with myself that I honestly cannot remember how it looked at different times. I only remember it looking like this.



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 12:50 PM
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Here's a couple of links to pics of pruned cherry trees. I had one but had to dig it up because it had some sort of disease to do with witches or something. Maybe you missed the blossom, sometimes it lasts under a week.

weeping cherry pruned

If you scroll down this link you'll see the tree at different times of the year.weeping cherry by the seasons



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 04:58 PM
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Originally posted by wigit
Here's a couple of links to pics of pruned cherry trees. I had one but had to dig it up because it had some sort of disease to do with witches or something. Maybe you missed the blossom, sometimes it lasts under a week.

weeping cherry pruned

If you scroll down this link you'll see the tree at different times of the year.weeping cherry by the seasons


I think we have a winner!
If that's not the exact tree I can see then it's close, thanks for that.

I shall be germinating some normal cherry stones soon in about August, can't wait to see how they develop.
I have a six weeks old Apple seedling and also two day old one at the moment which one day I hope to plant in my garden, when I settle down and have one
edit on 30-5-2012 by Vasteel because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 02:10 PM
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This is my first time uploading, so please forgive me if I haven't done it correctly! These pictures were taken with my phone camera, and I could not get them perfectly in focus, but I think they are close enough to see what I'm asking.

The first picture, while blurry, shows two berries from the same tree, they are whitish and bright red. Now, I am pretty sure that this is a Mulberry tree. I am trying to figure out what kind. If the berries were just white, I'd say white mulberry, and if they were just red, I'd say the american red mulberry. But with both colors, from what I've researched, is it safe to assume that this is a hybrid of the two? Also, I know the berries are edible, does anyone know of any medicinal uses for any parts of this tree? I am trying to start a catalog of the edible and medicinal herbs/weeds/trees etc in my immediate vicinity.



The second picture is a close up of the leaf of the Mulberry tree (pretty sure its a mulberry, seeking confirmation). Because the leaf is not lobed, I want to say its a white mulberry. But I didn't know they would have two colors of berries?? Hybrid? How do I know when the berries are ripe for eating?



The third picture is a low growing flower I came across. Again, it's a horrible picture, but it looks so unique maybe someone might recognize it? (If the pic is too bad, I will try to get back out and get a better one, with my real camera this time).



The last picture I just thought was neat because of the butterfly, but if anyone knows what the white flowers are, that would be great too!



Also, if it helps, I am located on the eastern coast of North Carolina.

Question: The pictures are rotated properly on my computer, but when I upload them there are turned sideways. I can't seem to figure out how to fix that, could someone help me out?
edit on 3-6-2012 by MojaveBurning because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 03:08 PM
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reply to post by MojaveBurning
 


The mulberries will darken in time. They all start off white. The bottom picture is what we call a Rose of Sharon.
It can be grown as a bush or a smallish tree and come in a variety of colors ranging from palest pink to deep purple.

www.bing.com...

It is a distant relative of the hybiscus a tropical flower.

www.bing.com...
edit on 9-6-2012 by karen61057 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 10:04 AM
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I could use some plant identification assistance. Yesterday (July 13) I took a walk on a nature trail in a park in the Lake Erie region and came across the following flowering plants:







Thanks in advance for the ID's.



posted on Jul, 14 2012 @ 10:26 AM
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reply to post by GoneGrey
 


The top one's a yellow mullein.



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 10:57 AM
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reply to post by GoneGrey
 


Bottom one is either a type of coneflower, or a gaillardia. I get the two mixed up.


Ye, I think it's gaillardia, (I forgot the common name for that plant). Fanfare is closest I could find to your pic.
edit on 18-7-2012 by wigit because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by GoneGrey
 


B could be This



posted on Jul, 18 2012 @ 04:09 PM
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Took a nice afternoon walk today and realized I waited too long for the mulberries... no sign of them now. I did come across some wild grapes. They are green and pretty hard, will they turn color when they are ripe? Do they get any sweeter? Would they be good for making jelly? I don't want to miss these (like I did the mulberries) so roughly when would you (anyone) suggest I check on them again? (I thought I took a pic of the grapes but I guess I didn't, but I am positive that is what they are, I did make sure the leaves were right so as not to confuse with moonseed).

I also came across a lot of these berries shown in the first picture, I have no idea what they are personally. Does anyone else? The second picture is a neat thing I saw growing on a large tree that I believe has been planted intentionally because of it's location. The little spiky puffball on the end is pretty unique, so hopefully it's enough for you good folks to help me identify it!






I can't seem to remember how I got the pictures on there last time....



posted on Jul, 20 2012 @ 10:11 AM
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reply to post by MojaveBurning
 


We have a lot of wild grapes here and yes it isplain to tell when they are ripe. You can cook with them just google wild grapes. My mulberries fared horrible this year I know the cherries here were destroyed by the early spring and I think it was the same with the mulberries.



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 06:43 PM
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I took another walk today (mid September) in the same Lake Erie region park as in my previous post. Today's jaunt was marked by an abundance of some particularly attractive berries. I have no idea what these plants are called. Hopefully my following photos reveal enough of the foliage to provide some useful clues.

Thank you in advance to the clever members who I am certain will be able to help me out!








posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 11:48 AM
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#1 is "dolls eyes" AKA Actaea pachypoda. It's poisonous. (Most white berries are)

#2 MIGHT be barberry. www.picsearch.com...

Due to my short attention span, I've forgotten what #3 looked like. Now that I'm on the "reply" page I can't go back and look at it again just now.
edit on 18-9-2012 by whitewave because: add link pic



posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by whitewave
 


Thanks for your reply, whitewave.

The foliage of Doll's Eyes didn't match the plant I photographed so I did some addtional sleuthing and I am certain now that it is Red Osier Dogwood.

As for #2, the deep red, oval berry, I'm still stumped. I'm guessing it is a hard berry ( I was too afraid to touch them lest they were poisonous) as opposed to soft like a blueberry. They were no more than about 3/8" in length (approx. 1cm) and did not appear in clusters as you can see from the pic. They were very glossy -- almost artificially so.

#3, while blueberry-like in appearance, doesn't grow on a bush with foliage like my own blueberries.

All of these fall berries are very attractive. One can easily see why children are tempted to sample them without thought to whether they are safe or not for ingestion.



posted on Aug, 29 2013 @ 10:38 PM
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Could number 3 possibly be a smilax (lauifolia)? It looks like it might have tendrils and if it also has thorns, that would be the identifier since smilax are the only plants to have tendrils AND thorns.





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