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U.S. military blocks websites to help Japan recovery efforts

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posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 06:19 PM
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U.S. military blocks websites to help Japan recovery efforts


www.cnn.com

The U.S. military has blocked access to a range of popular commercial websites in order to free up bandwidth for use in Japan recovery efforts, according to an e-mail obtained by CNN and confirmed by a spokesman for U.S. Strategic Command.
The sites -- including YouTube, ESPN, Amazon, eBay and MTV -- were chosen not because of the content but because
their popularity among users of military computers account for significant bandwidth, according to Strategic Command spokesman Rodney Ellison.
The block, instituted Monday, is intended "to make sure bandwidth was available in Japan for militar
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 06:19 PM
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Is this to save bandwidth or web censorship?

I really hope this is to keep the internet pipeline open
for important information to get through....

If people believe an internet kill switch is just some made up
conspiracy theory, just remember that they can turn on and off
what ever they want at anytime ANYWHERE!!

I'm sure some of the people in Japan could use some
entertainment at a time like this but if this saves lives then i'm all for it...

Keep an eye out on the government though you never know,
they may be trying to block the realities of what is really happening...

www.cnn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 06:33 PM
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Originally posted by hillynilly

If people believe an internet kill switch is just some made up
conspiracy theory, just remember that they can turn on and off
what ever they want at anytime ANYWHERE!!

You've read just a little too much into the article while adding unneeded spin and misdirection to your posts.

The military is blocking sites on their internal military networks through software. Just as schools block sites on their internal networks through software to keep kids from visiting certain sites.

There doesn't need to be any more read into it than that.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 06:35 PM
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reply to post by hillynilly
 



...The sites -- including YouTube, ESPN, Amazon, eBay and MTV -- were chosen not because of the content but because
their popularity among users of military computers account for significant bandwidth, according to Strategic Command spokesman Rodney Ellison


They say users of military computers???

Damn right to stop their pay.

Start doing some real work chair- bound grunts!
Stop wasting tax payers money watching MTV on the job.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 06:37 PM
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This is a cover up they dont want the japanese public finding out anything. Trying to stop the mass panic that they all going to get rediation poisoning.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 06:38 PM
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reply to post by _BoneZ_
 


* Youtube.com
* Googlevideo.com
* Amazon.com
* ESPN.go.com
* eBay.com
* Doubleclick.com
* Eyewonder.com
* Pandora.com
* streamtheworld.com
* Mtv.com
* Ifilm.com
* Myspace.com
* Metacafe.com


Facebook is not blocked thats a surprise...

They can do it internally they can do it externally....

That is a kill switch my friend anyway you look at it...



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 06:38 PM
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It does say the sites are being blocked only on the .mil domain, which is the military's prerogative. I don't suppose they have to provide any internet access to military personnel from their bases/ships. So far it's not the military/government blocking Web access in the civilian realm.

I'm curious as to why only those sites? If they are concerned about bandwidth being used by military personnel why not close down all Web access (leaving only .mil email available for communicating with loved ones)? Why block Myspace and not block Facebook? I suppose their logic is "these are the high-bandwidth sites", but blocking Google Videos/Youtube doesn't that just shift viewers over to Yahoo or Hulu, etc?

And what, not one pron site being blocked?


Truth be told, I think this is a "dry run" for how the military, then the government, can impose an internet kill switch when they deem it necessary.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 06:41 PM
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Originally posted by Blackmarketeer
It does say the sites are being blocked only on the .mil domain, which is the military's prerogative. I don't suppose they have to provide any internet access to military personnel from their bases/ships. So far it's not the military/government blocking Web access in the civilian realm.

I'm curious as to why only those sites? If they are concerned about bandwidth being used by military personnel why not close down all Web access (leaving only .mil email available for communicating with loved ones)? Why block Myspace and not block Facebook? I suppose their logic is "these are the high-bandwidth sites", but blocking Google Videos/Youtube doesn't that just shift viewers over to Yahoo or Hulu, etc?

And what, not one pron site being blocked?


Truth be told, I think this is a "dry run" for how the military, then the government, can impose an internet kill switch when they deem it necessary.


Ah now were getting somewhere...

The same question I posed..

Maybe it is just a way to save face, make it look like they are doing more to help??

It just seemed odd to me either way.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 06:42 PM
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Originally posted by _BoneZ_

Originally posted by hillynilly

If people believe an internet kill switch is just some made up
conspiracy theory, just remember that they can turn on and off
what ever they want at anytime ANYWHERE!!

You've read just a little too much into the article while adding unneeded spin and misdirection to your posts.

The military is blocking sites on their internal military networks through software. Just as schools block sites on their internal networks through software to keep kids from visiting certain sites.

There doesn't need to be any more read into it than that.


And they've left open Facebook and such so that military in Japan and military net users can communicate with families at home. This is a non-story given the crash that Japanese based infrastructure has suffered, including US bases there.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 06:43 PM
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I agree with Bonez. This is an internal decision, freeing up resources to aid in more important areas.

I am all for a good conspiracy, especially in the military, but it seems to me that this is a wise decision. If they move it into the private sector, then we have issues.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 06:50 PM
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Sure, the military make great test subjects because they can't complain, and you have to admit, it makes a certain amount of sense that the military would feel obligated to "free up" bandwidth for emergency reasons. So we get the perfect opportunity to test a limited-run "kill switch".

I would be willing to bet military planners have been waiting for some sort of disaster to occur just so they could put this test into operation. And what they learn here, will be utilized by the CIA/NSA or DHS on how to kill all Web access when they deem it fit to do so.

The reason for doing this sound like BS.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 06:51 PM
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Originally posted by hillynilly
reply to post by _BoneZ_
 


* Youtube.com
* Googlevideo.com
* Amazon.com
* ESPN.go.com
* eBay.com
* Doubleclick.com
* Eyewonder.com
* Pandora.com
* streamtheworld.com
* Mtv.com
* Ifilm.com
* Myspace.com
* Metacafe.com


Facebook is not blocked thats a surprise...

They can do it internally they can do it externally....

That is a kill switch my friend anyway you look at it...




Hilly, any network admin anywhere (civie or military) worth his salt can block sites at will: that is no grand conspiracy, that is just reality.

This is an available bandwidth issue, nothing more.

Japan, including the landlines US forces use for internet access through Japanese ISPs (not talking the sat links and such) has lost a lot of infrastructure, at the same time more people around the world are trying reach Japan than ever before to reach friends and family.

Do you notice how many bandwidth-intensive sites are temporarily cut off? That's why.
edit on 15-3-2011 by mydarkpassenger because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 07:01 PM
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reply to post by mydarkpassenger
 


I do hope there is nothing more to it just seems weird to have this
major announcement about it.. Like a pat on the back is needed or something.

Some people still believe that there is no such thing as a *internet kill switch*
This and you stating any network admin can block and shut down sites that
are under their control proves it can be done on a large scale..

All I mean...

They even did it in Egypt...

Again, it probably is innocent intentions, but we have to keep an eye out on them still.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 07:05 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 

All due respect, we cannot admit anything as to the "intent" of the military and why it has "freed-up" the extra bandwidth needed. All we can do is take them at their word and I know thats hard to swallow.

I am willing to bet that this is not an attempt to test the "internet kill switch". Cutting off access to unimportant websites, within their own network, is prudent planning in a time when that resource is best used elsewhere.

You can throw quotation marks around anything, but it does not prove nefarious intent.

edit on 15-3-2011 by sheepslayer247 because: add content



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 07:05 PM
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reply to post by hillynilly
 


The "Internet Kill Switch" is something to be aware and concerned about - that's a real idea Obama and DHS have come up with, make no mistake! You got that right! I don't like the idea they are even thinking of something like that.

But I think the current actions are strictly practical efforts to conserve bandwidth in a time of crisis and reduced capacity.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 07:22 PM
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reply to post by mydarkpassenger
 


You won't hear an argue out of me on that..

I thought it was a good read, thats why I made the thread....

Anyone else reading can take what they want from it..



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 07:59 PM
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reply to post by hillynilly
 


Every one of those sites you've listed is a high-bandwidth and popular video-streaming website. Again, they are trying to reduce the bandwidth consumption during this crisis in Japan, which is perfectly reasonable and legitimate.

Ultimately, anyone using military computers or the military network is privileged to have internet. It's not a right. Everyone will still have the privilege of having internet with just a minor inconvenience of not being able to watch online videos.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 08:30 PM
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Just a little "FYI",that I have noticed is one of my e-mail addresses always shows the military base near by my home. I am a cillvian;not military in any way.Today I was unable to access an internet connection twice.The first time was first thing in the morning,and am thiking my ISP cut me off due to paying late! ( I was late,but paid a week prior to cut off date) Strange,suspect,I do not know.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 03:21 PM
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Youtube is not playing now and im not militry and in Australia the site is up can brows but no play . Why dont the turn of the pawn sits that will save s@#t loads of band w



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 03:24 PM
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reply to post by hillynilly
 


I think you can add twitter to that it's been down since I been online about 2 pm EDT Dang stupid a#HOLES!!!!
WTF? What they need to do is crack down on the military morons using them stupid dimwits, but nobody ever accused Our Government of having a brain...now I gotta suffer because they are idiots and can't control their men and women?





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