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Hypothesis about the I.S.S.

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posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 09:08 PM
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reply to post by Aliensun
 


Perhaps you are unaware that Soyuz has flown fewer missions than the Shuttle, had as many fatal accidents, more launch failures and a lot of near misses. FYI.

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posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 10:02 PM
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Originally posted by Saint Exupery
reply to post by Aliensun
 


Perhaps you are unaware that Soyuz has flown fewer missions than the Shuttle, had as many fatal accidents, more launch failures and a lot of near misses. FYI.

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I'm more aware that the shuttle program is expensive and is running out of "fuel", and that the US supposedly has nothing on the launch pads to replace it and the Russians are prepared to take up the slack (with US dollars buying the gas I assume). You can expect within the next year that the ISS eventually will be "moth-balled." Doesn't all of that strike you as a bit odd, better yet, hugely startling given the initiatives of other nations at this time?

If you discount all reports about the triangles, you are not thinking beyond what TPTB want you to know and the obvious possibilities of what such craft mean to space travel. If you are in any way interested in the triangles being the replacement for all rockets, manned and otherwise, you can check out my fairly recently thread on ATS entitled The Nuts and Bolts of Black Triangles.



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 05:10 PM
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quote]Originally posted by G.A.G.

Originally posted by Phage
Assuming that the shuttle (and presumably the Soyuz spacecraft) have been carrying covert payloads to the ISS, I have a question. If those payloads carry satellite upgrade materiel, how is that material transported to and installed on the satellites? Almost any satellite rendezvousing with the ISS would be visible from the surface of the Earth. All it would take would be one such clandestine rendezvous to be sighted and the jig would be up.

Most of the experiments on board the ISS are not for use on Earth, the majority have to do with the effects of space on humans and other processes. Research for our future in space.
www.nasa.gov...

edit on 2/21/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)


I was pre-supposing they utilize our space shuttle or "Soyuz", as you pointed out. The space shuttle arrives at the ISS, drops off supplies or "stores", fresh cosmonauts ( people who launch with the shuttle that were not told about), whatever. Now, after departing the ISS, they rendevous with satellite/satellites needed upgrade or repair...and do it. They then return to earth. Didnt they repair or upgrade the hubble in this way?



NASA has helped to fuel the current space boom by providing financial and technical assistance and making the ISS an anchor customer for space services through its Commercial Crew and Cargo Program Office, or C3PO. As well as paying out $500 million in rewards for reaching various technical milestones, NASA has agreed to pay $1.6 billion to SpaceX for the delivery of 20,000 kilograms of cargo to the ISS between 2011 and 2015, and $1.9 billion to Orbital for delivery of the same amount. Should NASA want to send more cargo aloft, each contract could be worth over $3 billion. The C3PO is also investing $50 million in firms that are developing systems for commercial human spaceflight. However, NASA is responsible for supporting half of the six-person crew on the ISS, and the astronauts are exchanged only every six months, potentially creating a ceiling for growth.


Here is something I found that kinda backs up my belief that most of what we have been told is just a "ruse". Wonder what weighs roughly 50 tons that needs to be delivered to the ISS, between "soon" and 2015?. C3PO



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 05:59 PM
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reply to post by G.A.G.



Here is something I found that kinda backs up my belief that most of what we have been told is just a "ruse". Wonder what weighs roughly 50 tons that needs to be delivered to the ISS, between "soon" and 2015?. C3PO

 
Start with food. The average person eats about ton of food a year. The crew of the ISS is 6 people, the three that NASA is responsible for accounts for about 15 tons there but maybe they're light eaters. Smaller quantities of water and other "expendables" but it adds up fast.

wiki.answers.com...
www.independent.co.uk...
www.kold.com...

But 40,000 kg is not 50 tons, it's 44.

The Hubble missions did not go via the ISS. They were non-stop flights.


edit on 2/22/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 06:18 PM
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reply to post by G.A.G.
 



Now, after departing the ISS, they rendevous with satellite/satellites needed upgrade or repair...and do it. They then return to earth. Didnt they repair or upgrade the hubble in this way?


Did you not watch that video I posted? It has a lot of information. May have to watch several times, it's quite complicated first time through....

The orbital inclinations of many satellites can be Googled.

For instance, the ISS:

ISS has a 352 km perigee and a 364 km apogee, with a 51.6 degree inclination.


The Hubble:

Hubble has a higher orbit (around 600 km), but a 28.5 degree inclination.


www.physicsforums.com...

_____
And:


(ISS):
Inclination: 051.6471°
Perigee Height: 348 km
Apogee Height: 354 km
ISS, Heavens Above.





ORBIT:
Circular: 593 km
Inclination: 28.5 degrees.
Orbital period: between 96 and 97 minutes

More about Hubble.



The Shuttle is simply incapable of doing what you suggest. Orbital mechanics, laws of physics. Until they invent a very different type of propulsion system. One that has excessive amounts of power available, and/or is independent of gravity in some way.

Like, the "technology" of Star Trek...science fiction (unless it's, as is posited by many on ATS, already TOP SECRET and in use). Or, "reverse-engineered" from extraterrestrial spacecraft. Another popular belief espoused here......

edit on 22 February 2011 by weedwhacker because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by G.A.G.
I have pondering over the last few years, what exactly have we "gained" from the International Space Station, and its' existence?...
...
......C'MON, to date I am unaware of even a single discovery made on the ISS, that has any difference at all down here on earth.


It's not about tangible discoveries they are making in the finished space station -- it's the discoveries, knowledge, and experience gained from building the space station. It's also about learning how to live in space...

...i.e., We've gained the knowledge of how to build something like the ISS in space, and we are gaining the knowledge of how to live in space for extended periods of time.

When we go to Mars, the spacecraft used for the journey will most likely be built in orbit, a lot like the ISS was built (it needs to be large -- too large to launch in one piece). The knowledge and experienced gained by building the ISS will be a huge advantage when it comes time to build the Mars spacecraft and other similar large craft.

When we go to Mars (and elsewhere), we will be in space for extended periods of time. The knowledge and experience gained on the ISS regarding the effects of long-term space stays on humans will be a huge advantage when we finally set out and explore places such as Mars.


edit on 2/22/2011 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2011 @ 07:00 PM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People

Originally posted by G.A.G.
I have pondering over the last few years, what exactly have we "gained" from the International Space Station, and its' existence?...
...
......C'MON, to date I am unaware of even a single discovery made on the ISS, that has any difference at all down here on earth.


It's not about tangible discoveries they are making in the finished space station -- it's the discoveries, knowledge, and experience gained from building the space station. It's also about learning how to live in space...

...i.e., We've gained the knowledge of how to build something like the ISS in space, and we are gaining the knowledge of how to live in space for extended periods of time.

When we go to Mars, the spacecraft used for the journey will most likely be built in orbit, a lot like the ISS was built (it needs to be large -- too large to launch in one piece). The knowledge and experienced gained by building the ISS will be a huge advantage when it comes time to build the Mars spacecraft and other similar large craft.

When we go to Mars (and elsewhere), we will be in space for extended periods of time. The knowledge and experience gained on the ISS regarding the effects of long-term space stays on humans will be a huge advantage when we finally set out and explore places such as Mars.


edit on 2/22/2011 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)


Thank you for your reply. After some of the replies and insight I've recieved in this thread, and re-visiting my thoughts, I can see where my some of my hypothesis may indeed have its flaws.Thankyou all. g.a.g.
edit on 22-2-2011 by G.A.G. because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by G.A.G.
As for the experiments they talk about...C'MON, to date I am unaware of even a single discovery made on the ISS, that has any difference at all down here on earth.


Not a single discovery as a result of the ISS you say? I have several examples of discoveries from the ISS and Space Exploration in general, that chances are, YOU use everyday...

NASA Inventions / Spinoffs

Kennedy Space Center Technologies

Spinoffs as a result of the space shuttle program

Do a google search before making claims my friend. There are alot of technologies that have been developed for space exploration that have benefited us here on the soil.



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 04:41 PM
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I think he said developed "on" the ISS, not "for" the ISS or space community.So, if that was the ops intentions, he still has a valid point.



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 05:06 PM
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Originally posted by G.A.G.
As for the experiments they talk about...C'MON, to date I am unaware of even a single discovery made on the ISS, that has any difference at all down here on earth.


List of ISS Experiments

Scientific Research on the ISS







i hope you'll watch the vids and tell me if they're what you were looking for.



posted on Feb, 28 2011 @ 08:20 AM
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I have a hypothesis that the ISS is used primarily for research on pigs in zero-g. After all, flying pigs is not something to be overlooked.



posted on Feb, 28 2011 @ 11:10 AM
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Originally posted by wildespace
I have a hypothesis that the ISS is used primarily for research on pigs in zero-g. After all, flying pigs is not something to be overlooked.


Well, once they get that "flying pig" problem solved, then everything else, proverbially, should follow.



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