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Hypothesis about the I.S.S.

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posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 04:23 PM
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I have pondering over the last few years, what exactly have we "gained" from the International Space Station, and its' existence? Heres what I came up with... since the technology found in most satellites becomes "obsolete" in an average of merely every two years, and its far too expensive to simply let them go to waste or crash and burn, or replace them... the I.S.S. provides an "outpost" of sorts for "satellite repair technicians" to live aboard in 3 or 6 month "duty" type deployments. Many of those 'deliveries" to the ISS, were in fact shipments containing upgrading software ,hardware, specialized tools and such for repairs or upgrades. Our Space shuttle program it seems, (IMHO) has been used as a transport vehicle for corporations that own/operate satellites of one sort or another. As for the experiments they talk about...C'MON, to date I am unaware of even a single discovery made on the ISS, that has any difference at all down here on earth.
Is there a conspiricy here? Well, I think so (IMO)




posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 04:38 PM
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reply to post by G.A.G.
 


I could see them using the station as a platform to do satelite repairs but as far as the research done on the station the majority of it has to do with things being in space and and how they react in space. With this in mind I don't know in what way you would expect to see their research used here on Earth. They research such things as space medicine, life sciences, physical sciences, astronomy and meteorology on the station. What they are researching they need to be in space, so much of what they find out does not have aplication on Earth and this may be why we do not here so much about what they have found out about on the station.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by G.A.G.
 


Well, if you want the propaganda it's here...

ISS Dividends

Believe what you will.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by G.A.G.
 


Remove the technology from the equation and what you are left with is this:

Can the nations on this planet put differences aside and work together to put man in space on a more permanent basis? To me this ISS is the melting pot experiment.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 05:24 PM
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Assuming that the shuttle (and presumably the Soyuz spacecraft) have been carrying covert payloads to the ISS, I have a question. If those payloads carry satellite upgrade materiel, how is that material transported to and installed on the satellites? Almost any satellite rendezvousing with the ISS would be visible from the surface of the Earth. All it would take would be one such clandestine rendezvous to be sighted and the jig would be up.

Most of the experiments on board the ISS are not for use on Earth, the majority have to do with the effects of space on humans and other processes. Research for our future in space.
www.nasa.gov...

edit on 2/21/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 06:12 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
Assuming that the shuttle (and presumably the Soyuz spacecraft) have been carrying covert payloads to the ISS, I have a question. If those payloads carry satellite upgrade materiel, how is that material transported to and installed on the satellites? Almost any satellite rendezvousing with the ISS would be visible from the surface of the Earth. All it would take would be one such clandestine rendezvous to be sighted and the jig would be up.

Most of the experiments on board the ISS are not for use on Earth, the majority have to do with the effects of space on humans and other processes. Research for our future in space.
www.nasa.gov...

edit on 2/21/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)


I was pre-supposing they utilize our space shuttle or "Soyuz", as you pointed out. The space shuttle arrives at the ISS, drops off supplies or "stores", fresh cosmonauts ( people who launch with the shuttle that were not told about), whatever. Now, after departing the ISS, they rendevous with satellite/satellites needed upgrade or repair...and do it. They then return to earth. Didnt they repair or upgrade the hubble in this way?



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 06:21 PM
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Originally posted by Montana
reply to post by G.A.G.
 


Well, if you want the propaganda it's here...

ISS Dividends

Believe what you will.


Is this what your talking about?
Scientists from all over the world are already using ISS facilities, putting their talents to work in almost all areas of science and technology, and sharing this knowledge to make life on Earth better for people of all nations.

To make life on Earth "better" for people of all nations.

Please inform me out of all the experiments they have performed, or are currently performing...have they made life on Earth better for even one person? I just want one example of an experiment done on the ISS that could not have been performed on earth... that made one persons life "better", here on planet earth.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 06:22 PM
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reply to post by G.A.G.
 



Now, after departing the ISS, they rendevous with satellite/satellites needed upgrade or repair...and do it. They then return to earth. Didnt they repair or upgrade the hubble in this way?


The Shuttle can't change its orbital inclination that easily. When they launch to rendezvous with the ISS, they have to "aim" their course and angle of inclination in order to match the Station's.

When, on a separate mission, they wanted to visit Hubble, then they took an entirely different course.

It takes a great deal of fuel to make huge orbital direction changes....







edit on 21 February 2011 by weedwhacker because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 06:27 PM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
reply to post by G.A.G.
 



Now, after departing the ISS, they rendevous with satellite/satellites needed upgrade or repair...and do it. They then return to earth. Didnt they repair or upgrade the hubble in this way?


The Shuttle can't change its orbital inclination that easily. When they launch to rendezvous with the ISS, they have to "aim" their course and angle of inclination in order to match the Station's.

When, on a separate mission, they wanted to visit Hubble, then they took an entirely different course.

It takes a great deal of fuel to make huge orbital direction changes....







edit on 21 February 2011 by weedwhacker because: (no reason given)


Im sorry maybe this is kinda silly but why does it take so much fuel to change "orbital inclination" in a zero gravity medium?



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 06:29 PM
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It's a weapons or shield program of some sort, and, yes, it probably does have to do with some of the satellites.. I have no real proof. This is just gut feel that came after observing who's been in and out of Huntsville over the years, the sometimes almost frantic shuttle missions, and the willingness to risk lives for this (old shuttles = dangerous). They wouldn't stick to something like this unless that's what it was. I'm sure there's a lot of money in this for someone to, somehow.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by G.A.G.
 


Dude, I'm not here to convince you of anything. You asked for information, I gave you a link to the propaganda page. Read it yourself and make up your own mind.

Believe what you will.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 06:45 PM
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The money spent on the space station could be use'd of earth to do far more.
like make better and cheeper ways to go into space.
and not wast money.
as for the Iss reparing sats. they would just use a small black ship to get to them.
guess what you can not see black in space.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 06:49 PM
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Originally posted by buddha
The money spent on the space station could be use'd of earth to do far more.
like make better and cheeper ways to go into space.
and not wast money.
as for the Iss reparing sats. they would just use a small black ship to get to them.
guess what you can not see black in space.


Yup, and because they are taliking about "cloaking" technology more openly these days... means to me that they have had this ability for quite some time now. Probably 20 or 30 years wouldnt surprise me a bit. (IMO)



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 06:59 PM
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reply to post by G.A.G.
 



.... why does it take so much fuel to change "orbital inclination" in a zero gravity medium?


I know the video seems long, but it has many answers. Oh, and "zero gravity" doesn't change the fact that all objects still have mass. "Weight" is merely a measurement of mass within a specific gravitational field (or acceleration due to gravity, or motion).

When you view the vid it will explain much. For example, at around 20 minutes in, the specific limitations of the Shuttle in changing its orbital inclination (angle). It only has enough fuel to effect about 3 degrees, at most, inclination change. It can't just "zip around" like in Star Trek, or Star Wars. That technology is....(well, if you believe some here at ATS, they say it already exists....but, is secret...)...who knows for sure?



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 07:12 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


Is it possible that in pieces, they shuttled parts to build smaller, more nimble craft to perform this function...and just didnt think it was neccessary to inform us? The kind they could use cloaking technologies on?



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 07:48 PM
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Possibly the most important thing we are leaning from operating the space station is...

(wait for it)

...how to operate a station in space. What are the maintenance requirements? How many men do you need just to keep things running, as a ration to the people doing science (on Mir, it was typically two people to stay on top of the problems while one did research). What technologies contribute to reliability? Is it better in the long run to make things more reliable, or easy to fix? Spares & tools take-up space & mass - do we need them? Is there a trade-off point?

Currently, if a mission-critical item breaks and can't be fixed, the spare is flown-up on the next supply mission. If something goes really wrong, the crew can abandon ship and be on Earth in a few hours tops. A Moon base would be several days from resupply, rescue or return. An asteroid mission may be weeks away. Once a mission to Mars is on its trans-planetary trajectory, it is committed to years away from Earth, with no possibility of resupply, rescue or return.

We need to know these things before we cross the ocean of space.


jra

posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 07:54 PM
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Originally posted by G.A.G.
the I.S.S. provides an "outpost" of sorts for "satellite repair technicians" to live aboard in 3 or 6 month "duty" type deployments. Many of those 'deliveries" to the ISS, were in fact shipments containing upgrading software ,hardware, specialized tools and such for repairs or upgrades. Our Space shuttle program it seems, (IMHO) has been used as a transport vehicle for corporations that own/operate satellites of one sort or another.


Do you have any evidence to support this hypothesis? Because this just seems like speculation.

As already stated by others. The ISS is in a fixed inclination and any space ship in orbit is generally stuck in the inclination that it launched into. The Shuttle nor any other known space ship can not make any drastic orbital changes. And I would imagine it would be cheaper to simply replace an old satellite with a new one, than to launch replacement hardware, send people to do the work in orbit, etc. That could get expensive really fast.


As for the experiments they talk about...C'MON, to date I am unaware of even a single discovery made on the ISS, that has any difference at all down here on earth.


To expect any significant changes to life on Earth from ISS experiments is an unrealistic expectation.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 08:15 PM
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Originally posted by jra

Originally posted by G.A.G.
the I.S.S. provides an "outpost" of sorts for "satellite repair technicians" to live aboard in 3 or 6 month "duty" type deployments. Many of those 'deliveries" to the ISS, were in fact shipments containing upgrading software ,hardware, specialized tools and such for repairs or upgrades. Our Space shuttle program it seems, (IMHO) has been used as a transport vehicle for corporations that own/operate satellites of one sort or another.


Do you have any evidence to support this hypothesis? Because this just seems like speculation.

As already stated by others. The ISS is in a fixed inclination and any space ship in orbit is generally stuck in the inclination that it launched into. The Shuttle nor any other known space ship can not make any drastic orbital changes. And I would imagine it would be cheaper to simply replace an old satellite with a new one, than to launch replacement hardware, send people to do the work in orbit, etc. That could get expensive really fast.


As for the experiments they talk about...C'MON, to date I am unaware of even a single discovery made on the ISS, that has any difference at all down here on earth.


To expect any significant changes to life on Earth from ISS experiments is an unrealistic expectation.


I have no concern with the "inclination" it is in, or how long it remains there.You are accurate to say any "known" space ship, which leaves open the possibility of such a craft indeed existing. Because you and I have not been told about a craft like this, doesnt neccessarily mean that there isnt one.
With all due respect two things...
1. No I have no evidence.
2. Spot on...only "speculation".



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 08:18 PM
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The ISS, as the shuttle is a humongous make-work program to keep our eyes on those bright lights in the sky and to keep much of American industry humming as the triangles are readied to take the stage. The triangles being the fruits of the "Star Wars" program (that they would us to think was laughted out of existence).

Not only is it a valid question of what has the ISS given us, but what has the shuttle given us? And guess what, we are going to be relying on the Russian's little, cheap manned modules to finish the business of the ISS. Certainly, that should be satisfying to all of us. No more white-knuckled shuttle launches after these remaining three. If you pray, do it for the next three crews.



posted on Feb, 21 2011 @ 08:23 PM
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reply to post by Aliensun
 


Thankyou for time. In the end its no big deal, cause theres nothing we can do about it anyway...however its interesting to get the views from others. g.a.g.



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