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Solar Activity Watch 2011

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posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:10 PM
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Originally posted by rbkruspe
reply to post by kdog1982
 


I did check it a few times I am sure, however, I was not too focused on it. Also, I only found out about the earthquake about 6 hours after the fact where I checked the NICT page only to see if it was still up as it is a japanese website, I was curious only for that. During CME related events the magnetosphere models are rather quiet half the time so its not where I turn my focus as a rule, except only periodically...however I did check it earlier for the first time today and only then did it hit me to check at the time of the earthquake but the data only goes back so far and it was not listed. Not too much looks out of ordinary as far as I can tell.


Man I wish I new how to post a pic of it then.Iknow how now.
But was something out of whack just before and during the quake.
Wonder if we can check the historical data on that.

I found this link from NICT with a movie of the magnetosphere on 3/11/2011.
It shows some wierd changes before and during the time of the quake at about 05:00 utc
Then it gets slammed sometime afterwards by a blast fome a solar flare.
www2.nict.go.jp...
edit on 14-3-2011 by kdog1982 because: added




posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 08:48 PM
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Concerning the Real-time Magnetosphere Simulation the image hasn't updated since Mar 14. I sure hope they're ok (since they are located in Japan). Or maybe it's because of the rolling power outages to conserve power. I feel partially blind.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 08:58 PM
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reply to post by onthelookout
 


I found this, but I have no idea how to read the chart:

geomag.usgs.gov...

It's larger at the link.
edit on 3/15/2011 by this_is_who_we_are because: photo



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:51 PM
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Originally posted by onthelookout
Concerning the Real-time Magnetosphere Simulation the image hasn't updated since Mar 14. I sure hope they're ok (since they are located in Japan). Or maybe it's because of the rolling power outages to conserve power. I feel partially blind.


The NIST has an archived movie,any date,but you have to have Dvix video codec to view,and it takes awhile to download at 5 mins for me we broadband cable.
look at 03/10/2011 and 03/11/2011.
On 3/10 you will see a few solar flares hit and on 03/11 so will see the magnetosphere acting crazy before 05:00 GMT when the earthquake hit.www2.nict.go.jp...



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 01:09 AM
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Yes, thank you, I knew that. That hasn't been updated since the 13th. I'm use to looking at it periodically throughout the day in real time. I didn't realize how much I looked at it until it quit getting updated. I hope it's just temporary, I miss it



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 01:13 AM
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reply to post by onthelookout
 

You can always go to the source. The RTMS uses data from the ACE satellite.
At the moment solar wind density is quite low, speed is moderate, and there is a slight north turn. Translation: no big deal.

www.swpc.noaa.gov...



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 11:59 AM
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SUPER FULL MOON: On March 19th, a full Moon of rare size and beauty will rise in the east at sunset. It's a super "perigee moon"--the biggest in almost 20 years. Get the full story from Science@NASA.
Spaceweather


Get your camera ready, this should be a beauty!



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 12:40 PM
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Did anyone notice the solar activity last night? I am not sure if I am wrong or something however it looks like the CMEs of cycle 24 are bit like very fast bullets!

Here we go :

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

Starts at 1:24

Also , anyone noticed a decreased number of images provided by the Stereo Sat?
stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 10:45 PM
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Spaceweather.com

HERE COMES TROUBLE? A big sunspot is emerging over the sun's southeastern limb, and it is crackling with activity. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory recorded a surge of extreme ultraviolet radiation from the sunspot's magnetic canopy on March 21st:

This appears to be the return of old sunspot 1165, last seen in early March when it formed on the sun's southwestern limb. Since then it has been transiting the far side of the sun, apparently growing in size and restlessness. The potential for trouble will become more clear in the hours ahead as the active region emerges in full. Stay tuned -



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 10:51 PM
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Spaceweather.com NASA photo





posted on Mar, 23 2011 @ 04:48 AM
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Hey can someone tell me what this object is on the left of sun? It appears right in the beginning and stays in same position??

sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov...



posted on Mar, 23 2011 @ 04:58 AM
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reply to post by Smurfgt801
 



Are you referring to the black dot/blob?
Yeah, saw that, odd...

Don't know enough . Be interested to see what people come back with.



posted on Mar, 23 2011 @ 05:03 AM
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reply to post by 5senses
 


Yeah I have been watching it for a week



posted on Mar, 23 2011 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by Smurfgt801
 


Perhaps something on the lens



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 11:00 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 02:06 PM
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Looks like old 1166 (the X flare creator a couple of weeks ago) is creeping around the corner again. Looking busy now, and forecasted to get busier this week:

FLARE 0-24 hr 24-48 hr
CLASS M 50 % 60 %
CLASS X 05 % 10 %
spaceweather.com...

and:

roduct: Solar Region Summary
:Issued: 2011 Mar 28 0030 UTC
# Prepared jointly by the U.S. Dept. of Commerce, NOAA,
# Space Weather Prediction Center and the U.S. Air Force.
#
Joint USAF/NOAA Solar Region Summary
SRS Number 87 Issued at 0030Z on 28 Mar 2011
Report compiled from data received at SWO on 27 Mar
I. Regions with Sunspots. Locations Valid at 27/2400Z
Nmbr Location Lo Area Z LL NN Mag Type
1176 S15E02 200 0400 Eki 15 27 Beta-Gamma
1177 N19W02 204 0030 Cro 04 05 Beta
1178 S15E32 170 0060 Dao 05 08 Beta
1179 N09W74 276 0000 Axx 01 01 Alpha
1180 N24E40 162 0050 Hsx 02 01 Alpha
1181 S26E45 157 0020 Hsx 02 01 Alpha
1182 N13E01 201 0000 Axx 01 01 Alpha
1183 N15E62 140 0150 Eai 13 08 Beta-Gamma
IA. H-alpha Plages without Spots. Locations Valid at 27/2400Z Mar
Nmbr Location Lo
None
II. Regions Due to Return 28 Mar to 30 Mar
Nmbr Lat Lo
1166 N10 110
1169 N17 078
www.swpc.noaa.gov...



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 02:09 PM
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Can I ask a dumb question? Isn't it that the earth revolves around the sun once a year? So how is it that a sunspot could be already circling back to face us again in only a month? I can't figure this out.

edit on 28-3-2011 by SunnyDee because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 02:21 PM
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reply to post by SunnyDee
 


Best explanation I can think of is that our orbit around the sun takes one year, but our own day takes 24 hours as not only are we moving around the sun, we also spin on our own axis. The Sun's individual day is a lot longer than ours. It spins too. More or less.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 02:22 PM
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reply to post by SunnyDee
 


ok asked and answered for myself. The sun spins at it's equator every 27 days and at it's pole every 31. Interesting.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 02:28 PM
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reply to post by SunnyDee
 


The difference in the Solar orbit times is why said I 'more or less'.

But I am glad you found the answer, also.





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