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Bob Lazar Has His Own Particle Accelerator

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posted on May, 21 2010 @ 11:14 AM
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Originally posted by Just Wondering
It sounds like you are changing the future.


To use the electricity gained from going from D2O to H2O, or similar step, is an angle that often does not seem taken.

Consider that internal combustion engines are mainly on the road, people look for ways to covert them to multi-fuel.

Seems like the main solution is to use a solid state battery storage as the main supply of energy to the drive system, and use a secondary system to recharge the solid state battery. This idea is highly sought after, yet Big Oil clearly has its thumb down on this one to keep up combustable fuel as a prime consumer market. Usual tactic seen is for Big Oil to show that solid state battery are inefficient in means way, yet those concern are moot with the secondary system, which could be a combustion engine (i.e. hybrids).




posted on May, 21 2010 @ 11:17 AM
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reply to post by MAC269
 



After dark you can use Earths latent heat by placing water pipes underground to store heat which can be converted to electricity...



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 11:20 AM
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Originally posted by dzonatas
To use the electricity gained from going from D2O to H2O, or similar step, is an angle that often does not seem taken.


How do you go from D2O to H2O?



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 11:39 AM
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reply to post by buddhasystem
 


You do not; I think he is confused about the process being used.

Respectfully

MolecularPHD

Also I would like to know what his plan is for all of those spent battery cores he is referring to; currently they are taken to landfill
(



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 11:43 AM
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Originally posted by MolecularPhD
reply to post by buddhasystem
 


You do not; I think he is confused about the process being used.


My question was rhetorical



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 11:44 AM
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Originally posted by dzonatas

Originally posted by Just Wondering
It sounds like you are changing the future.


Seems like the main solution is to use a solid state battery storage as the main supply of energy to the drive system, and use a secondary system to recharge the solid state battery.

Doesn't my 2004 Honda Civic Hybrid use this principle?

It is electric/gasoline powered. When the gas engine is coasting it is recharging the batteries for the electric motor.
I average 42 mpg on this baby!



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 11:47 AM
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Originally posted by buddhasystem
How do you go from D2O to H2O?


To summarize what's already been mentioned in the last so many pages... you need a intermediate state. Fusion devices, PEM devices, sunlight, gravity vacuum/space, etc... or use what MolecularPHD suggests, yet I would call it a gaseous PEM device rather than "nanoparticles."

I wonder if MolecularPHD might try to contact Ballard Power Systems for ideas in polymerization of his "nanoparticle" idea. A gaseous polymer seems ideal.



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 11:53 AM
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Originally posted by MolecularPhD
You do not; I think he is confused about the process being used.


Oh... I'm not confused your process. I have another process in mind.


Also I would like to know what his plan is for all of those spent battery cores he is referring to; currently they are taken to landfill


Isn't that the usual concern Big Oil touts to keep their combustable engine.

Let us know when you get your device to zero-emissions.

[edit on 21-5-2010 by dzonatas]



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 11:58 AM
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reply to post by dzonatas
 


Your concept is a nice thought but, that is all it can be is a thought; Solid State Batteries do not have the high current capacity that is need to run any large load vehicles; NiFe have the same problem they do not have the ability to deliver the amount of currents you would need for large load vehicles.

NiFe have a long shelf life and can be recharged up to 150,000 miles to 200,000 miles but they will still need to have some type of fuel source to supply the engine what it needs under heavy loads on the engine.

Respectfully

MolecularPHD

P.S. Hydrogen needs non of the above and have 4 times the energy potential of fossil based fuels and is clean, abundant, and renewable.



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 12:00 PM
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Originally posted by dzonatas

Originally posted by buddhasystem
How do you go from D2O to H2O?


To summarize what's already been mentioned in the last so many pages...


I just went through all of them.


you need a intermediate state. Fusion devices, PEM devices, sunlight, gravity vacuum/space, etc...


So, how does "gravity vacuum/space" relate to "going from D2O to H2O? How does a "fusion device" accomplishes same?



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 12:01 PM
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Originally posted by Just Wondering
Doesn't my 2004 Honda Civic Hybrid use this principle?


Similar principle.

Note that they used "consumer" grade deployable batteries. It's an intermediate solution.



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 12:09 PM
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Originally posted by MolecularPhD
P.S. Hydrogen needs non of the above and have 4 times the energy potential of fossil based fuels and is clean, abundant, and renewable.


Of course...

I think you underestimated what I meant by solid state battery. What you call a hydrogen generator still fits in the realm of a "battery" when compared to the "drive" system. The key points being: 1) rechargeable, 2) safely storable, and 3) produces energy (in electricity or more optimally in hydrogen itself). Please, take some time to rethink who was confused.



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 12:20 PM
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Originally posted by buddhasystem
So, how does "gravity vacuum/space" relate to "going from D2O to H2O? How does a "fusion device" accomplishes same?


Ask yourself where they naturally occur... nevermind, it doesn't seem important to you.

[edit on 21-5-2010 by dzonatas]



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 12:26 PM
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reply to post by dzonatas
 


The emissions coming from our current vehicle is as follows; and is in fact 85% more efficient then the current electric hybrids on the road proven by our winning the "Green Pick" award against the top produces of hybrid vehicles.

15mph
rpm 1492 %CO2 3.3 %O2 0.0 HC 16 3 16 %CO 0.11 0.01 0.09 NO 102 22 104

25mph
rpm 1495 %CO2 4.1 %O2 0.0 HC 8 2 8 %CO 0.14 0.03 0.10 NO 105 25 108

"GoodGuys" 2008 Green Pick Award

I would like to point out the above is from a 390Ci V-8 Engine with 300+ HP ; not a 4 cylinder or 6 cylinder with 78HP to 135HP.

Respectfully

MolecularPHD



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 12:30 PM
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reply to post by dzonatas
 


This system is not producing electricity it is producing a gas that is burned in the combustion chamber of the vehicle; it is not fuel cell technology it is a Hydrogen On-Demand Generator.

Respectfully

MolecularPHD



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 12:43 PM
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Originally posted by MolecularPhD
Yes that is what I am saying. We ran before and after DYNO testing both engine bench testing and full vehicle testing under normal driving loads on a Ford 390Ci Engine in a 1964 Ford T-Bird; at Roush Auto Labs; HP before Hydrogen Induction System installed 310HP, after “H.I.S.” installation 345HP to 348HP depending on amount of induction of HHO-Lpm rates and air-flow mixtures (carburetor was 650CFM 1805 series Eldelbrock). The same tests were performed on a 2007 GM Duramax 6.6L Turbo Diesel V-8; the diesel test showed a much higher percentage increase of 50 to 55HP; and a total reduction in exhaust emissions of 92%; as well as, we were able to gain 65% increase in mpg in gasoline and 72% increases in diesel performance mpg under normal running loads at 65mph.

these much needed tests.


Hi Mphd

Thanks for the reply. A few more questions I am afraid.

1. What is the efficency of your H2 generation system?
2. Have you determined the reason behind the substantial increase in overall vehicle efficiency?
3. Does CARB prevent you bench testing an ECU controlled engine?
4. On an ECU controlled engine do you have seperate mass flow sensors for the H2?
5. Is the system designed for retro-fit or new cars as well?
6. Have you changed the compression ratio of the engines tested?

Many thanks


[edit on 21/5/2010 by LightFantastic]



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 12:49 PM
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Originally posted by MolecularPhD
This system is not producing electricity it is producing a gas that is burned in the combustion chamber of the vehicle; it is not fuel cell technology it is a Hydrogen On-Demand Generator.


Again, of course, the hydrogen is ideal. You shown it in terms of being able to combust that hydrogen feed, yet there are still goals and logical reasons for zero-emission vehicles. I still think there is something useful about your system even for non-combustable drives, but you seem to mistake that to mean electric only.

[edit on 21-5-2010 by dzonatas]



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 12:51 PM
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Originally posted by Just Wondering
I average 42 mpg on this baby!


Lol, in europe I can buy a car with reasonable 8 seconds 0-62 (and much better in gear performance than this figure suggests) that does nearly 70mpg!

PS Your car has an IC engine as the primary source and electric as secondary.


[edit on 21/5/2010 by LightFantastic]



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 01:04 PM
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Originally posted by dzonatas

Originally posted by buddhasystem
So, how does "gravity vacuum/space" relate to "going from D2O to H2O? How does a "fusion device" accomplishes same?


Ask yourself where they naturally occur... nevermind, it doesn't seem important to you.


...you just keep dodging questions. I asked specifically about "gravity vacuum/space" gibberish you posted and you say "or but that's not important to you". Posting stuff like this on ATS is akin to going to the bathroom without bothering to use TP or flush the toilet. Same unsanitary result.



posted on May, 21 2010 @ 01:14 PM
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Originally posted by LightFantastic

Originally posted by Just Wondering
I average 42 mpg on this baby!


Lol, in europe I can buy a car with reasonable 8 seconds 0-62 (and much better in gear performance than this figure suggests) that does nearly 70mpg!
I was kind of happy with my mpg until I read your post.
Why aren't they selling those vehicles here in the U.S.
And may I ask what vehicle you are talking about?



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