CNN: Conspiracy Theorists Are Potential "Suicide Warriors" & Are Mentally Disturbed

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posted on Mar, 9 2010 @ 05:33 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


ya thats ridiculous they are saying that we are a bunch of schizophrenics. If they even stopped for a couple minutes to look at the evidence they would know 9/11 and JFK assassination could be a conspiracy. But those people that think conspiracy theorist are freaks never even took the chance to look they just believe what they are told and not look for themselves. All the way til i was a sophomore in high school i was a republican that believed the official story, i didn't even know there was a conspiracy theory, until i looked up the conspiracy theory then at first i laughed at it saying wow anyone can make up a story but then when it got done to math and science, which i am good at, i calculated the fall of the building the burning of the fires in the basement of the twin towers and realized they where right. Jet fuel only burns for a short time not more then a day yet the fires there burnt for weeks. And i didn't know a 3rd building collapsed in NYC on 9/11 for no reason. I then realized the OS was wrong and realized there was more to it.

I started looking up about bin laden, sliverstein, bush, chaney, i realized that this theory. that i first thought was bogus and tried to prove it with the OS. could have been possible. But one thing for sure people obviously need to know is that the JFK assassination could not have been done by one man. Two of those bullets came in at different directions. No matter what if our government did or didn't do it still there had to have been more then one shooter to pull off that shoot. No evidence today can explain otherwise.

These people that think conspiracy theorist are freaks need to take look for themselves at the info before judging. If people knew that in Julius Caesar's time they would probably stopped the conspirators ahead of time but Julius himself thought conspiracy theorists were freaks, i think he would have thought differently if he could get a 2nd chance. Seriously stop listening to the Media, don't listen to either side's story and believe, conspiracy or not, do your own research and make your own judgment. That guy on that video is robbing you of your mind you need think for yourself not that idiot trying to say we are freaks. I rely on evidence and so i don't believe in all conspiracy, i know the holocaust happened and jesus really died of the grave and didn't fake it and also that there is no such things as alien reptilians, i looked at each conspiracy theory in a none bias view and in there is no evidence on one side to prove it, and has science or history to bach it up, and its just a person's, or people's biased opinion and it can be just a bogus made up story with no facts or is generalizing and has crappy video quality and photoshopped pictures, yes i can tell i do photoshop and can tell when i see one, then im going to not believe them. If its generalizing people of a certain type and saying all these Jews or Christians or politicians are planning to take over and have bogus stories and made up facts they have lost, because i im not stupid. 9/11 and JFK are big deals people need to look into and not have government tell them what is true, LOOK FOR YOURSELF MEDIA IS A SUBLIMINAL MIND F***ER, I TAKE SOCIOLOGY AND MEDIA CAN TRICK YOU FROM THE TRUTH. COMPUTER, TV, RADIO, NEWSPAPER, NEWS, INTERNET. It all can be false so for the last time DO YOU OWN RESEARCH PEOPLE. DON"T LISTEN TO THAT IDIOT ON THE VIDEO TRYING TO BLIND YOU FROM THE TRUTH.

[edit on 9-3-2010 by Ferginator]




posted on Mar, 9 2010 @ 05:39 PM
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Originally posted by niikkii
I like how he mentions this about conspiracy theorists, are we not allowed to have a different opinion now? Sure there are some nutjobs like that guy but I think this is just a poor attempt to turn the hard of thinking viewers against the truth.
In a way its a good thing because were getting some recognition so obviously what some people bring up on here and elsewhere must bring an element of truth if they are so worries to put it on CNN. lol


good point niki if our theories are ending up on the big news channels, funny thing is since they are trying to promote the idea of not looking at the conspiracy they actually didn't know the reverse psychology that people are going to look it up. So they only just made himself look like an idiot for saying that on CNN



posted on Mar, 10 2010 @ 02:38 AM
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reply to post by Recouper
 


I replied to your post, but not for your benefit. Your post was passive-aggressive and amounted to an attack.

Well, thank you for responding, whatever your motive.

Shall we pass on the passive, and just say my post was aggressive? I don't mind.


You've made clear in that post that you are against:

- Conspiracy Theorists

(in your own words: "Someone whose connexion with reality is so twisted that he or she has come to see a simple middle-of-the-road position as somehow wicked or wrong.")

Thank you, also, for repeating my words. I've left them in the quote above so that others might read them, too.

I am not against conspiracy theorists. One lot--the aggressive confabulators who spearhead these movements--are mentally unhinged, while the rest are caught up in a form of mass hysteria. How can one be against the sick? It isn't their fault they're ill.

What I am against is conspiracy theories. They threaten law and order. They bleed the life out of the democratic process and society itself by promoting self-marginalization and self-exclusion among the citizenry. Sane, informed citizens should fight them with all their might, even at the risk of looking as if they are attacking the theorists themselves.

I think it depressingly ironic that so many Americans, who of all peoples on Earth have the most power to choose who governs them and set the agenda for the governors, should selfishly opt instead to defect from their society and its poltical process. And why? Because the majority of their fellow-Americans (the much-maligned 'sheeple') see things in a different light and opt to do things a different way. A plain-spoken name for a conspiracy theorist is Sore Loser.

*



- (You are against a) free society with non-intervention of State

- Individual privacy and freedom not being restricted by the State

- Non-restriction of the Internet and the free exchanging of ideas the Internet can facilitate

Not at all. My political position is that of a classic nineteenth-century liberal. 'Liberal' in this sense isn't code for 'socialist', the way poorly-educated American conservatives sometimes use the word; I believe in and support the principle of minimal state interference in the economic, social and private lives of its citizens. I prize the rights of free speech and free association. I am for free enterprise, property rights and equal treatment for all. I believe in equality of opportunity but reject equality of outcome. My position was famously summed up by one of the fathers of liberalism, John Stuart Mill, as follows:


The object of this Essay is to assert one very simple principle, as entitled to govern absolutely the dealings of society with the individual in the way of compulsion and control, whether the means used be physical force in the form of legal penalties, or the moral coercion of public opinion. That principle is, that the sole end for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively in interfering with the liberty of action of any of their number, is self-protection. That the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others. His own good, either physical or moral, is not a sufficient warrant. He cannot rightfully be compelled to do or forbear because it will be better for him to do so, because it will make him happier, because, in the opinions of others, to do so would be wise, or even right. These are good reasons for remonstrating with him, or reasoning with him, or persuading him, or entreating him, but not for compelling him, or visiting him with any evil, in case he do otherwise. To justify that, the conduct from which it is desired to deter him must be calculated to produce evil to some one else. The only part of the conduct of any one, for which he is amenable to society, is that which concerns others. In the part which merely concerns himself, his independence is, of right, absolute. Over himself, over his own body and mind, the individual is sovereign. - On Liberty, Ch. 1. Published 1859.

There is a world of difference between someone who believes in liberty, and a conspiracy theorist. Liberty is always threatened, and must, as Harold Laski (now there was a real socialist!) said, be fought for afresh in every generation. However, conspiracy theorists confabulate nonexistent threats to liberty, seing Reds or Rothschilds under every bed, or inflate real but manageable threats into fanged, ichor-dripping bogies. And invariably, the remedies they promote constitute a greater danger to liberty and justice than the threats they warn against. Conspiracy theorists are not friends of liberty; they are its enemies. Islamic terrorists, right-wing militiamen armed to the teeth, Timothy McVeigh, the Unabomber--what are these people, if they are not conspiracy theorists?

It is from that position that I argue, and have always argued. My politics have not changed one whit since I joined ATS in 2005, and my message here has always been the same.

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I don't wish to reply to your comment regarding a black president being more than most white Americans can stand, as I find the accusation entirely uncivil.

All the same, I'm glad you brought it up, because it gives me a chance to quote this paragraph from The Economist, a British magazine whose political position is more or less the same as mine, and which is widely read and appreciated by a saner and better-adjusted class of American:


RACISM explains a lot of white opposition to Barack Obama, say some Democrats. It would be foolish to dismiss this argument out of hand. Lexington walked into a shop in Millington, Tennessee last week and asked the white gentleman behind the counter what he thought of the 44th president. “He’s a (two words banned on ATS and you can guess what the second one is)” came the reply. The shopkeeper then helpfully explained that he was “not bashful” about expressing his opinions.

And I never said it was 'more than most white Americans can stand'; the word I used was 'many'. And it is true.

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You'll not find many here who'll afford you the credibility to be worthy of their time.

I will make so bold as to say that is their loss, and their societies'--not mine.

[edit on 10/3/10 by Astyanax]



posted on Mar, 10 2010 @ 04:45 AM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 


I find your position on liberty commendable. But I find your opinion of conspiracy theorists to be a veritable parody or satire.

If conspiracy theorists make any difference when it comes to any sort of political change, it will not be some application of "remedies they promote". It will be from the social pressure brought about by the realisation of a high enough percent of the general population that the facts need looking at and truthful answers have not been forthcoming. That might well be achieved shortly by conspiracy theorists shouting "everybody, look here!" or something to that effect.
People are not going to say "thank you Alex Jones for explaining to me the true nature of the world, now please be the leader of the new world and implement the change we need as you see fit". There's your satire. There are crazy people everywhere, making caricatures of them is pointless.

Conspiracy theorists promote scrutiny into governments and corporations. That's the reality and it's a good thing, it's a necessary thing.



posted on Mar, 10 2010 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 


How can somebody claim to be for liberty and against conspiracy theory?

Conspiracy theory is healthy skepticism by inquisitive minds, and in many many cases it results in scientific breakthrough! Chemistry, Astronomy, Geography, Mathematics, Physics, and emerging scientific fields have all had breakthroughs and even novel and unique theories as a result of someone not believing the status quo, or delving deeper to find the hidden meaning.

I agree that ATS has a lot of nonsense on it, but I don't mind wading through the nonsense to find some very interesting fact-based theory and insight now and again!

Being against "conspiracy theory" is being against free thought, and the scientific method, and human wonder and curiousity. Being against "conspiracy theory" is being against progress, and being against checks and balances, and being against open government by the people and for the people. Being against "conspiracy theory" is admitting that your mind is so closed that you cannot fathom a life or a world or an existence any different than the one you have.

You have abandoned hope, and you have decided that nothing can change? Why?

[edit on 10-3-2010 by getreadyalready]



posted on Mar, 10 2010 @ 12:21 PM
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Critically thinking conspiracy theorists, who question everything and never concede to accepted logic will always be vilified because people are afraid of those they don't understand.

Those who rely on logic are not necessarily equipped to process thought critically and just cannot see that logic is not an indicator of high intelligence.

Those who seek to control the herd, know this and use it to further their agendas.



posted on Mar, 11 2010 @ 02:37 AM
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One reply will suffice for all three of you, since you all put forward more or less the same argument.

Scepticism of authority and officialdom is certainly an essential weapon in the arsenal of liberty. Never believe what someone in authority--or someone who presumes to authority--tells you without close examination and, if possible, independent verification. And when words and actions disagree, trust the action, not the word.

I am such a sceptic. I have been one all my life, and remain so.

It is precisely my scepticism you are attacking.

Conspiracy theorists are not sceptics. They are the most gullible people in the world. The originators--the confabulators--never examine their own theories critically; if they did, they would soon see the holes in them. And the rest, the ones who get swept along in conspiracist mass hysteria, are the real sheeple.

I said earlier that I don't hate conspiracy theorists. Allow me to correct myself; there is one type of conspiracy theorist I frankly loathe.

That is the cynical type who actively promotes a conspiracy theory in order to gain political, financial or other benefit from it.

Most of the conspiracy theories discussed on ATS are propagated, at least in part, by such slimeballs, even though it is often perfectly innocent dupes who bring them to the site for discussion. Of course, there are honest confabulators here as well--you can tell them easily, they're the obviously crazy ones.

But the bulk of the conspiracy-believing membership on this site comprises neither self-interested snake-oil artists nor drivelling lunatics; they're just ordinary, credulous folk caught up in one or another of the hysterical narratives that abound in American popular culture.

Conspiracy theories do not facilitate the dissemination of information and the operations of democratic society; they impede and obstruct it. Unfree societies that practise censorship abound in conspiracy theories and theorists; I noticed this during the years I spent living in the Middle East.



posted on Mar, 11 2010 @ 03:12 AM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 


Wow, some more advanced theorizing from Astyanax that I will have to dissect.



Conspiracy theories do not facilitate the dissemination of information and the operations of democratic society; they impede and obstruct it. Unfree societies that practise censorship abound in conspiracy theories and theorists; I noticed this during the years I spent living in the Middle East.


For one, I abhor your use of democratic society-The Democracy Conspiracy

So what you are saying is, that you agree with people here, that the US is a totalitarian type society. Since you said the CT's thrive in those type societies. We must be one of them.



Scepticism of authority and officialdom is certainly an essential weapon in the arsenal of liberty. Never believe what someone in authority--or someone who presumes to authority--tells you without close examination and, if possible, independent verification. And when words and actions disagree, trust the action, not the word.


Agreed. I would have to say that the Federal Government, by its actions over the last 30-40 years could very well be considered by the vast majority of us, to be detrimental to all, except a minor 1% of the population.




Conspiracy theorists are not sceptics. They are the most gullible people in the world. The originators--the confabulators--never examine their own theories critically; if they did, they would soon see the holes in them. And the rest, the ones who get swept along in conspiracist mass hysteria, are the real sheeple. I said earlier that I don't hate conspiracy theorists. Allow me to correct myself; there is one type of conspiracy theorist I frankly loathe. That is the cynical type who actively promotes a conspiracy theory in order to gain political, financial or other benefit from it. Most of the conspiracy theories discussed on ATS are propagated, at least in part, by such slimeballs, even though it is often perfectly innocent dupes who bring them to the site for discussion. Of course, there are honest confabulators here as well--you can tell them easily, they're the obviously crazy ones.


Wow, project much? Cass, is that you? Forgive others that transgress upon you, as you would be hope to be forgiven. The rest of the vitriol, I will not address.



But the bulk of the conspiracy-believing membership on this site comprises neither self-interested snake-oil artists nor drivelling lunatics; they're just ordinary, credulous folk caught up in one or another of the hysterical narratives that abound in American popular culture.


So what you are boiling it down to is this, everyone not in agreements with you, are slack jawed idiots, snake oil artists, lunatics or some other vitriol you have held back.

Someone needs mood enhancers. And I do not believe it is me.



posted on Mar, 11 2010 @ 03:21 AM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 


I would rather stand behind the conspiracy theorist(crazy or not) than the obedient never questioning person. The kind of person that is shocked and appalled by questioning of government or big business, the type of person that would rather not know or hear of things like the gulf of Tonkin incident or Operation Northwoods.. when these people hear about these sort of things they either accept it with intellectual honesty or they try to change the subject quickly as if to forget.

This is the type of person that is so scared of anything out of the norm that they will go to ridiculous lengths to consciously suppress it.
That's some serious cognitive dissonance, is it not?
I've had people tell me straight up: "I don't WANT TO KNOW!", cause ignorance is bliss to them.
This would be fine for me if it wasn't for the fact that unscrupulous people do take advantage of this, this is why everything is going downhill fast.

An example, I recently had a chat with a young woman and I brought up project paperclip, her first reaction was to laugh at me and ask me what kind of crazy idea that was and where I got it from, that was until I showed her the Wikipedia page, as soon as she saw it she changed the subject.. like som invisible switch had been turned on. "Forget about this", "Don't probe further".

It's the everything out of the norm is crazy denial disorder, and it's running amok.



posted on Mar, 11 2010 @ 06:55 AM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 


Conspiracy theorists are not sceptics...? They are the most gullible people in the world...? They would never examine their own theories critically; if they did, they would soon see the holes in them...?

That seems to me a strange generalisation. I really totally disagree with you. But not only is your opinion of what a conspiracy theorist is entirely opposite from mine and I would suspect most people's, it is so perfectly opposite, I'm left wondering if you are actually being serious or if you are just baiting for reaction.

You say that conspiracy theories do not facilitate the dissemination of information and the operations of democratic society and that they impede and obstruct it. I'm surprised that you would say that. You are claiming conspiracy theorists and conspiracy theories to be the exact opposite of what they are accepted to be.

If that's actually, seriously your position, then that seems odd to me, but OK, sure.
However, using psychological attack techniques to coerce people's subconscious is entirely uncool. Your opinions are your opinions, not some moral law code that needs to be enforced by Astyanax the Psych Terminator (anybody wondering what I'm talking about, see page 4).



posted on Mar, 11 2010 @ 09:07 AM
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reply to post by Recouper
 


Not only is your opinion of what a conspiracy theorist is entirely opposite from mine and I would suspect most people's, it is so perfectly opposite, I'm left wondering if you are actually being serious or if you are just baiting for reaction.

Most people, in my experience, frequently express the view that conspiracy theorists are crazy, though they may be (see below) quite ready to entertain temporarily the possibility that the theories themselves have merit in them. Conspiracy theories are entertaining, one way or another; why do you think I love this site so much?

Psychologists, academics and commentators on current affairs mostly also regard conspiracy theories as false and psychologically aberrant. Many psychologists see them as a form of hysteria.

Here are the top five results of my Google search for conspiracy theory psychology


  1. Conspiracy theory is a term that originally was a neutral descriptor for any claim of civil, criminal or political conspiracy. However, it has become largely pejorative and used almost exclusively to refer to any fringe theory which explains a historical or current event as the result of a secret plot by conspirators of almost superhuman power and cunning.

    Conspiracy theories are viewed with skepticism by the scientific community and academia, and often ridiculed by pundits, because they are rarely supported by any conclusive evidence and contrast with institutional analysis, which focuses on people's collective behavior in publicly known institutions, as recorded in scholarly material and mainstream media reports, to explain historical or current events, rather than speculate on the motives and actions of secretive coalitions of individuals. Wikipedia


  2. Obviously, all conspiracy theories require that there be a “villain,” a group of “them,” who is responsible for a conspiracy which is invariably targeted at “us.” Beyond this requirement, “generic” conspiracy theories are usually “tailored” to specific conditions.

    For our purposes, we can consider conspiracy theories to fall into one of three general categories: obstructive, oppressive, and deceptive. The Psychology of Conspiracy Theories from World Mysteries


  3. When fervent individualists feel that they cannot exercise their independence, they experience a crisis and assume that larger forces are to blame for usurping this freedom. "For one who refuses to relinquish the assumptions of liberal individualism, such newly revealed forms of regulation frequently seem so unacceptable or unbelievable that they can only be met with anxiety, melodrama, or panic." Paranoia, 9/11, and the roots of conspiracy theories from Psychology Today


  4. My own research suggests that people think that a major or significant event must have been caused by something similarly major, significant or powerful. However, often official accounts for events, or more mundane, everyday explanations, fail to seem big enough. We do not feel particularly comfortable with the idea that something unpredictable or accidental like a car crash could have a big effect like the death of a Princess, or that a single mad gunman could assassinate the most powerful man in the world. That troubles our sense of the world as being a relatively stable, safe place to live in, (so) sometimes we try and cast around for an explanation that matches the magnitude of the event that we see in front of us, and conspiracy theories can provide that explanation. The psychology of conspiracy by Dr Patrick Leman, Psychologist, Royal Holloway College, University of London, on BBC


  5. In addition to other brain abnormalities, schizophrenics have too much dopamine. Just as addicts' desensitized dopamine systems make them feel that nothing matters, high levels of the neurotransmitter make schizophrenics believe that everything is significant... The addict's dopamine-driven salience system keeps telling her that something very important is happening, (so) ordinary events appear intensely meaningful. That police car? That song on the radio? That man with a cigarette walking by? They must be part of a massive international conspiracy. Conspiracy Theories Explained from Psychology Today


Using psychological attack techniques to coerce people's subconscious is entirely uncool. Your opinions are your opinions, not some moral law code that needs to be enforced by Astyanax the Psych Terminator (anybody wondering what I'm talking about, see page 4).

Gosh, is that really what I was doing? All I thought I was doing was writing as persuasively as possible. Are you sure you're not falling victim to a bit of conspiracy-theoretical reality-distortion yourself?

Maybe my typing fingers are really being controlled, unbeknownst to me, by electronic signals from US government operatives on the other side of the world. Perhaps they're being beamed down to my skull by satellite, or by a Predator drone flying over the Indian Ocean. :shk:

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reply to post by TheLaughingGod
 


I would rather stand behind the conspiracy theorist (crazy or not) than the obedient never questioning person. The kind of person that is shocked and appalled by questioning of government or big business, the type of person that would rather not know or hear of things like the gulf of Tonkin incident or Operation Northwoods.

Are there a great many people like that? Relate a juicy scandal or conspiracy theory to most people and they're fascinated. They may reject them on reflection, but they love hearing about them.

The only people who tend to reject new and disturbing information absolutely are political ideologues, religious fanatics, monomaniacs and conspiracy theorists. Folk, in other words, who have their own line of talk to peddle.


An example, I recently had a chat with a young woman and I brought up project paperclip...

Operation Paperclip, I presume. You don't mention the context in which you brought it up; were you simply teaching her a little history, or were you trying to use Operation Paperclip as 'proof' of some conspiracy theory, e.g. 'the higher echelons of the US military and political establishment are riddled with Nazis?' If the former, then her reaction is a bit odd (and in my view, unlikely); if it was the latter, then her response is perfectly understandable. I would have responded in exactly the same way myself.

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reply to post by endisnighe
 


So what you are saying is, that you agree with people here, that the US is a totalitarian type society. Since you said the CT's thrive in those type societies. We must be one of them.

No. (A ⇒ B) ≢ (B ⇒ A). Conspiracy theorists don't really get logic, do they?

[edit on 11/3/10 by Astyanax]



posted on Mar, 11 2010 @ 09:15 AM
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If conspiracy theorists stuck to critical thinking, there would be no problem. There would also be about 1/000th of the posts on this site, as only irrational folks can come up with most of the nonsense on ATS.

That's the issue. People in the CT world tend to think of themselves as hardened investigators, akin to Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, but don't seem to realise that those two guys had to use critical thinking and hard evidence to break open the Watergate scandal. They couldn't just point to some shaky photographs (or whatever their equivalent of YouTube was back then) and say "HA! PROVE ME WRONG!!!" - they had to compile enough evidence to convince a judge. I've yet to see a single conspiracy theory from the CT crowd that could ever have a hope of doing that.

So yeah, the vast majority of conspiracy theorists aren't thinking rationally, usually with a tinge of paranoia, which I guess are the first prerequisites for tilting at windmills. If I were wrong, sites like this wouldn't be crammed with so much baseless conjecture being claimed as fact.



posted on Mar, 11 2010 @ 09:30 AM
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He's absolutely correct in his assessment. That is why the McCain/Lieberman/Scott Brown's S. 3081 Enemy Belligerent Interrogation, Detention, and Prosecution Act is being proposed. I fear it doesn't go far enough though.

There are too many people with too much freedom in this country. It's time to put an end to it. Most people don't seem to care much about their freedom anyway.



posted on Mar, 11 2010 @ 09:32 AM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 



Conspiracy theories do not facilitate the dissemination of information and the operations of democratic society; they impede and obstruct it. Unfree societies that practise censorship abound in conspiracy theories and theorists; I noticed this during the years I spent living in the Middle East.

It is great news that you respect the critical thought and skepticism. I have to agree with you on one point. Conspiracy Theorists are definitely their own worst enemy. The 1000 crazy ideas clung to with irrational loyalty make it very difficult to believe the 1 idea based in fact. There are a TON of gullible people, even on ATS, and there are a TON off bandwagon riders (especially in the press).

Examples: Palin, Beck, and FOX are killing the Tea Parties with their parasitic coattail surfing to tout their own agenda.

9/11 Skeptics including myself, are hamstrung by the fringe theories that make us look crazy. There is a lot of real discrepancy, and a lot of reason to question the official story, but there is so much fantasy that it makes all the skeptics look crazy.

Still, I think you are being a little rash in labeling all Conspiracy Theorists in the manner that you have. Remember the Scientific Method relies on somebody taking an opinion, finding facts to support it, creating a Theory, and then testing that theory relentlessly. This method is the very basis of all Modern Science, and I would like to point out that a lot of Conspiracy Theorists follow this very model, and therefore we are "Scientists!"



posted on Mar, 11 2010 @ 09:34 AM
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AAAHHHHH IM CRAZYYYYYYYYYY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



posted on Mar, 11 2010 @ 09:50 AM
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Originally posted by Astyanax
reply to post by TheLaughingGod
 


I would rather stand behind the conspiracy theorist (crazy or not) than the obedient never questioning person. The kind of person that is shocked and appalled by questioning of government or big business, the type of person that would rather not know or hear of things like the gulf of Tonkin incident or Operation Northwoods.

Are there a great many people like that? Relate a juicy scandal or conspiracy theory to most people and they're fascinated. They may reject them on reflection, but they love hearing about them.

The only people who tend to reject new and disturbing information absolutely are political ideologues, religious fanatics, monomaniacs and conspiracy theorists. Folk, in other words, who have their own line of talk to peddle.


An example, I recently had a chat with a young woman and I brought up project paperclip...

Operation Paperclip, I presume. You don't mention the context in which you brought it up; were you simply teaching her a little history, or were you trying to use Operation Paperclip as 'proof' of some conspiracy theory, e.g. 'the higher echelons of the US military and political establishment are riddled with Nazis?' If the former, then her reaction is a bit odd (and in my view, unlikely); if it was the latter, then her response is perfectly understandable. I would have responded in exactly the same way myself.


Yes indeed there is, evidenced by the fact that you constantly hear people say: "The government wouldn't do that, they would never hurt their own population." They're evidently brainwashed and in denial.

No, most often people will look at you like you are crazy, they're not interested in juicy conspiracies, the subject is taboo.

Yes Operation Paperclip, I brought it up while generally discussing WWII, I just mentioned it, nothing more, nothing less.. And she laughed and discounted it at first just because she had never heard of it and to her it sounded outlandish.
Mind firmly closed.

The whole economy is a giant freaking conspiracy and most don't realize it, are you saying it isn't?

The tungsten gold bars? There's another conspiracy.

Politics is by its very nature riddled with conspiracies and you know it.



posted on Mar, 11 2010 @ 10:00 AM
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They did this in the 60's during Vietnam, they called us "radicals" "commies" & "Leftys"... I got tear gassed on the north pentagon steps back then...Im starting to have trouble getting around these days, any of you with stronger backs actually getting out there to demonstrate? I was still getting out there 5 years ago..not so much lately. Where might I find threads or a board about actually organizing some in-the-streets-peaceful-demonstrations??

Nothing scares the # out of a tyranny more than the people showing up in force, by torchlight. Back then there was no net. There were flyers in university cafeterias...

You guys have it easy. Don't let their heavy handed psychological ops drain your determination. Don't let the choreographed performances of naysayers make you think for an instant you cant make a difference.

Joke about the hippies but we actually forced the end of the Vietnam war.

Hand wringing doesn't work. protests in the street do.



[edit on 11-3-2010 by seataka]



posted on Mar, 11 2010 @ 10:11 AM
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Yes Operation Paperclip, I brought it up while generally discussing WWII, I just mentioned it, nothing more, nothing less.. And she laughed and discounted it at first just because she had never heard of it and to her it sounded outlandish.
Mind firmly closed.

The whole economy is a giant freaking conspiracy and most don't realize it, are you saying it isn't?

The tungsten gold bars? There's another conspiracy.

Politics is by its very nature riddled with conspiracies and you know it.


heh, you are on top of what is really going on, i know about the tungsten too...

and re operation paperclip...

A freind of mine's dad was the guy that ran Operation Paperclip, there were tens of thousands of the more brilliant nazi minds from all facets of science, engineering, medicine and psychology...brought over here, given US sounding names and assigned JOBS at major us corporations AND especially, at The (brand new at the time) US Central Intelligence Agency.

Compare this to the flaccid disinformation on Wiki of a couple of hundred "Rocket scientists" ..


[edit on 11-3-2010 by seataka]



posted on Mar, 11 2010 @ 10:27 AM
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Originally posted by Smack
He's absolutely correct in his assessment. That is why the McCain/Lieberman/Scott Brown's S. 3081 Enemy Belligerent Interrogation, Detention, and Prosecution Act is being proposed. I fear it doesn't go far enough though.

There are too many people with too much freedom in this country. It's time to put an end to it. Most people don't seem to care much about their freedom anyway.


"Freedom's just another word for
Nothing left to lose..." Listen



[edit on 11-3-2010 by seataka]



posted on Mar, 11 2010 @ 10:44 AM
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reply to post by seataka
 


Your friend's dad saying stuff doesn't make it true. This is why people laugh at conspiracy theorists - that baseless statements are elevated to the level of absolute truth (if they support the conspiracy theorist's theory), yet comprehensive research is ignored (if it contradicts said theory).

Some dude claiming things doesn't make it true, no matter how much you want it to be.





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