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Planning on hoarding canned foods? Better think twice!

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posted on Dec, 15 2009 @ 10:19 AM
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I was camping this summer and something made off with my one pot leaving me with many cans intended to be cooked. I was really craving these canned meatball things (some spanish brand) and to test the safeness of cooking the can directly over the flame I first just heated the lid.
That stuff looks like demons pouring out of hell when you burn it. Needless to say, I cooked each meatball with a stick- slowly.


What I hate about BPAs is that we've deviated so far from nature we've forgotten how to get back.

[edit on 15-12-2009 by Moonsouljah]




posted on Dec, 15 2009 @ 10:40 AM
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This whole BPA fear issue started in Canada and we were quick to climb on board with the help of Chuck Schumer from NY trying to ban the stuff. His only claim to support the ban is "better safe than sorry". No need to ban BPA. Just another way to drive product costs through the roof.


There have been enough warning signs about the dangers of BPA that we cannot wait to act,” said Schumer. “It’s better safe than sorry.



Meanwhile, Australia and New Zealand have gone on record in affirming the safety of bisphenol A and stating their concurrence with the findings of the FDA and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ), an independent statutory agency responsible for setting food standards in the two countries, issued an unequivocal statement that BPA does not cause cancer nor do low levels of exposure to BPA pose a significant health risk.


www.foodhaccp.com...

To those who advocate home canning, go for it. It is a dying skill. My grandparents maintained a good sized victory garden for decades that kept both of them busy canning and storing for the Winter months. They kept a well stocked fruit cellar full of fruits and vegetables. They always had extra for their neighbors and family.



posted on Dec, 15 2009 @ 10:47 AM
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Originally posted by marg6043
reply to post by expat2368
 


You are not that old, I also remember the home canning and it was in glass jars.


Modern convenience and dependency on the food industry has killed the way things used to be before, now no many people knows what is not the art of canning.


That is why I learned to can this year.I make my own jelly and it is
better than what you get in the stores.My husband made some homemade
spaghetti sauce and I canned the left-overs.It's expensive to get started,
but when you have your supplies,you'll eventually save money.The food
quality is better as well.I would recommend learning to can.



posted on Dec, 15 2009 @ 10:48 AM
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Real environmental problems have been left in the shadows since global warming stole the spotlight. Big pharma and frankenfood corporations are the most serious environmental polluters.

Where is the mass media outrage?

Where is the global emergency conference?



posted on Dec, 15 2009 @ 10:57 AM
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Originally posted by ShogunAssassins
Oddly enough i have been drinking cans of pop and eating caned goods all my life.. And i still breath!!


Okay, since you went there. How long will that have been then? Don't have to give the total years of your life but maybe a good round guess of the total years of eating from these canned goods and bottles?

Edit to add: Just trying to make a point that seems to be lost more and more in this site that is built for logical debate. Just because ONE person states that they have been doing something for an undetermined amount of time and is in perfect health does NOT debunk a theory. The statement made by Shogun is simply one of the WEAKEST arguments against a theory out there. Yet it is a commonly used one on this site.

Then again, I just read the post where the guy pushing this is using the 'better safe than sorry' excuse for the push. Now talk about a weak reason!


[edit on 15-12-2009 by dariousg]



posted on Dec, 15 2009 @ 11:03 AM
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reply to post by dariousg
 


man i see people sucking on 20oz cokes-regular or diet- from a plastic bottle kind of creeps me out.



posted on Dec, 15 2009 @ 11:16 AM
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Originally posted by expat2368
I remember when home canned foods used glass jars...and the tops were lined with real ceramic...and it used a rubber seal. Problem with even modern mason jars is that the inside of the tops appear to be coated with the same stuff they use to line metal cans. (tin cans if you are an old geezer like me)

You spoiled my lunch too... I was just getting ready to pop the top on a can of smoked North Sea sprotes.


The original inventor of the canning process, M. Appert, used cork for lids. Thin sheets of cork can be glued together to make thick sheets of cork and then cut to fit any size bottle or jar. This is something to remember if none toxic lids are unavailable.

[edit on 15-12-2009 by eradown]



posted on Dec, 15 2009 @ 11:18 AM
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reply to post by GenLo
 




Planning on hoarding canned foods? Better think twice!


We have been canning directly from our garden and from fresh veggies purchased from the market for a few years now. We do stock back commercial canned and dry goods but... I'd say that at least a third or better is home canned.



posted on Dec, 17 2009 @ 12:53 PM
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Originally posted by mamabeth
That is why I learned to can this year.I make my own jelly and it is
better than what you get in the stores.My husband made some homemade
spaghetti sauce and I canned the left-overs.It's expensive to get started,
but when you have your supplies,you'll eventually save money.The food
quality is better as well.I would recommend learning to can.


+1 on that notion. We've been canning all our own vegetables from the garden, chili, soups, etc. for a couple years now.

Jelly is incredibly easy to make. With a pressure canner you can can your own soups, chili, meats . . . pretty much anything you cook can be canned at home with a pressure canner. Anytime we make chicken soup, chili, beef stew, whatever, it's not that much extra work to just make a double batch and can the leftovers.

The canning equipment costs a little up-front but the jars are really where you lose your hind end dollar-wise for the first year. But the jars are reusable pretty much forever so once you get a good supply of jars the cost evens out and you start saving money fast. Garage sales are a great place to get jars cheap -- I got over 30 quart & pint jars at a garage sale this year for just $5!



posted on Dec, 17 2009 @ 01:31 PM
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Good thread Genlo thank you for posting this. It does stand to reason
there would be something bad about food sitting in a metal contaianer
for an extended period of time. I would like to point out that I wouldn't
through out food you have stored because of this.
If we ever got into a bind that was of some magnitude, it would still be worth having around.
Definetly some great info. SnF
To be safe I guess it will have to be onions, fresh fruit and Malto meal.



[edit on 17-12-2009 by randyvs]



posted on Dec, 17 2009 @ 01:35 PM
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wow good find must have missed this thread, all the more reason to stock up on rice, beans, etc. Buy a dehydrator and use that to help store up on meats, fruits etc. S&F



posted on Dec, 17 2009 @ 03:35 PM
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Ok,
I'm not saying that the additives aren't bad. Of course they are. I'm not saying we shouldn't be aware. Of course we should!
However...
(ok, im not quite sure how to say what I'm thinking but I will try...)
Has it occured to anyone that every time one of these new 'fears' comes out it amplifies the helplessness people feel? Maybe that is the goal?
What I mean is:
Preparedness folks, we have a fear, we are facing it by storing food, supplies, getting in the right mindset. So here is yet another thing that has come out saying 'you're danged if you do, you're danged if you don't'.
If people hear enough of these scenarios, they give up. They become apathetic. (IE, "Why bother, if I stock up I may have food, but the food will kill me')
If they can make the problems big enough, or all encompassing enough (affecting every aspect we might consider)... we run the risk of giving up because 'no matter what we try we are doomed! There is no point, something we cant change will kill us!'
I know I am paranoid by nature. (See my username!) =) But it seems to me that the more 'news' like this the MSM and PTB put out, the better chance they have of the public becoming apathetic. Just where they want the public! People who think it's hopeless don't fight back!
This is just my rambling thoughts.
I hope it made some sense.
I will continue to home can, grow a garden -and- stock canned goods. I will not let them convince me there is no point: that no matter what I do, it is wrong.
~prep
(note: I do very much believe the additives in our food supply are nuts and have dire consequences. But, until I can personally change it, I will live with that knowledge and keep on keeping on.)



posted on Dec, 18 2009 @ 03:24 AM
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Originally posted by ShogunAssassins
Oddly enough i have been drinking cans of pop and eating caned goods all my life.. And i still breath!!


I love these morons! Just like a coworker of mine when I told him the chemicals and junk in McDonalds food and he sarcastically exclaimed that he loves chemicals in his food! That's just the mentality you deal with sometimes, the willfully ignorant who deserve nothing more than death, or do they? They have been conditioned to think this way anyway so why should I pass such judgment. Refusal to look at the facts and long term effects of such a diet lifestyle just because they don't experience it immediately.

Stars to everyone for contributing the fight against ignorance!

[edit on 18-12-2009 by GenLo]



posted on Dec, 18 2009 @ 03:29 AM
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reply to post by jibeho
 


Really hmm well lets look at the facts that all the diseases mentioned have only continued to climb in the number of people suffering from them. Surely there may be other contributing factor and even if this isn't the main contributing factor its still apart of the problem! Thanks for the input but "the proof is in the pudding" as they say.



posted on Dec, 18 2009 @ 03:33 AM
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reply to post by preparanoid
 


No problem in seeing things this way, but look at it like this... you are familiar with High Fructose Corn Syrup in just about everything you can get at your local grocer or Flouride in toothpaste and certain water supplies. I mean either you choose to educate yourself or you choose to be ignorant. You can still use mason jars, only problem with that is that glass is somewhat fragile, but its worked for my family for generations and unless there is serious report from credible sources that glass makes bad food storage then I will continue to use and enjoy them.



posted on Dec, 18 2009 @ 03:47 AM
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Well, i think the question now is, does BPA i think its called? build up in yuor system and stay, like fluoride and metals do?



posted on Dec, 20 2009 @ 05:52 AM
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The BPA toxicity cam through from baby bottles. they were releasing toxins into the baby's formula. Nalgiene had a similar problem and if your lucky enough to be Canadian, they reworked their product to eliminate BPA. However my understanding was that there many consumer products that still contain BPA but the issue is when those products are heated, or cooled, this is what cause the toxins to leech. I would imagine as long as your canned products were stored at room temp you would be safe.



posted on Dec, 20 2009 @ 12:12 PM
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reply to post by The_Smokeing_Gun
 


I thought it was only heating that caused the leech problems in plastic and canned goods. Curious though about room temperature, I assume you mean about 70 degrees, but many household's differ, and I wonder what amount of temperature change could possibly cause the leeching. I mean if spring turns to summer or fall to winter, could that not have an effect on the stored goods?



posted on Dec, 20 2009 @ 07:40 PM
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Depends on how and where u store your canned food, it's not practical to carry long term provisions in canned form, but If you have a root cellar or say a bunker and you are storing canned foods, once you reach 14 feet under ground it's a constant 14 degrees Celsius. I would think that would be suitable for storing canned provisions. It would be a matter of digging a simple root cellar in Sit X. that said I am not a big fan of canned provisions, I just don't like the having to dispose of the cans. plus if you are on the run they are bulky and a tell tale sign of human activity



posted on Dec, 20 2009 @ 07:49 PM
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reply to post by GenLo
 


Ya but in a worst case scenario what would you rather have hoarded can food or nothing???? I will take my chances with the cans just to stay away from the agonizing pain of starvation.



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