I'm am finally a Master Mason... Any Questions?

page: 25
7
<< 22  23  24    26  27  28 >>

log in

join

posted on Aug, 21 2012 @ 07:00 PM
link   
reply to post by mexicocity
 

I do belong to many groups, but I do it because I enjoy it and I have a knack for memorizing ritual.

That seems strange to have those societies in high school. I have heard of them, but I have not researched them too deeply. In high school my attention was elsewhere.


Dictators and despots rarely like organizations like Freemasonry. Religious oppressions also plays a part as they will not allow groups like Freemasonry who espouse religious and political freedom.

The triangle is used as a symbol throughout Masonry as the number 3 is seen countless times throughout the Fraternity.


Does Freemasonry use Astrology?

You can see remnants of astrology in some of the various bodies and degrees/orders of Freemasonry. I'm currently doing research on astrology, the zodiac, Canopic jars, the Bible, and the Banners of Royal Arch Masonry. It's quite the article.


What is the deal with Bohemian Grove?

They seem to be a bunch of adults playing around the forest of California. I don't worry much about them.


Do female Freemasons have to dress up in male stone masons clothes too?

Not sure. I don't belong to the co-Masonic orders. The Freemasonry I recognize and consider regular is male-only.


If Freemasonry could be modernised overnight, what would you change about it?

Increase dues, make degree progression a little harder, and put more emphasis on educational programs.




posted on Aug, 22 2012 @ 11:56 PM
link   
How do you get to a Higher Degree? What do you have to do?
edit on 22-8-2012 by F6Zman because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2012 @ 10:45 AM
link   
reply to post by F6Zman
 

Well, you take your first degree, pass a proficiency, get the next degree, and so forth until the 3rd degree. Then you may petition to join one of the other bodies such as the York Rite, Scottish Rite, Shriners, Eastern Star, etc.



posted on Aug, 23 2012 @ 12:11 PM
link   

Originally posted by F6Zman
How do you get to a Higher Degree? What do you have to do?
edit on 22-8-2012 by F6Zman because: (no reason given)


Just to be clear, in masonry, degrees do not equal rank. Once you are a third degree master mason, you are at the pinnacle of masonry. In order to become more informed, you can study all that the side orders have to offer, and then expand your learning to studies outside of masonry but along the same lines.

A third degree master mason who was master of his lodge has more say so and should have more respect than a 32nd degree Scottish rite mason who has never been an officer of the lodge. I know it's confusing, but from the inside, it makes perfect sense.



posted on Aug, 23 2012 @ 12:21 PM
link   
SORRY! BUT THE ABOVE IS NOT TRUE!

No Offense "network dude"...

Yes! Therein are things which in life can not be summed up by verses carefully constructed.
Instead your response should/would/could be "Experience It!"

Then you're more likely to be believed to the degree of certainty, which, needless to say, is the most calculated degree of assurance and comfort!
edit on 23-8-2012 by Pinocchio because: I Hate Pinocchio T'day!



posted on Aug, 23 2012 @ 12:24 PM
link   
reply to post by Pinocchio
 


I always like when a non mason tells us how it really is.

I was a 32nd degree mason less than 5 months after I was raised. I knew nothing.

My advise to you, study more, talk less.



posted on Aug, 23 2012 @ 12:28 PM
link   
reply to post by network dude
 


Thank You... tis indeed good advice.

Yet... did you not feel my effort to allow you to know I meant no offense?

Tis well enough to know my point is direct... yet not good if in fact I succumb to one who felt it directly.

Raise is not like rise!



posted on Aug, 23 2012 @ 01:06 PM
link   
reply to post by Pinocchio
 

I did not go into the Scottish Rite until my 5th year in Freemasonry, but before that I had presided over a Lodge and had been elected to preside over another. One's PM status, IMO, shows a Brother's dedication than their membership in the Scottish Rite.
edit on 23-8-2012 by KSigMason because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2012 @ 01:58 PM
link   

Originally posted by KSigMason
reply to post by Pinocchio
 

I did not go into the Scottish Rite until my 5th year in Freemasonry, but before that I had presided over a Lodge and had been elected to preside over another. One's PM status, IMO, shows a Brother's dedication than their membership in the Scottish Rite.
edit on 23-8-2012 by KSigMason because: (no reason given)


Thank You KSigMason.

But I'm not sure what "PM" is...

Although... I was just thinking to myself about "network dude"'s post.
He mentioned he was raised to "Sublime Knight of the 32nd" in 5 months.

For a grim second I doubted the lodge and even considered a more grim grace...
Then I repented and thought to myself that its possible because he is a very endowed man.
Meaning... His intellect and mental capacity allow for him to receive... then his moral ethics only add to the grace.

With you... I wonder now if waiting was a good thing. It seems you've aqcuired alot of rank and privilege.
Was it necessary to wait? and if so... was is a regret?

I find in my life of being non-mason... that I can project the various courtesies that a simple book can put forth.
But with "Weights & Measures" I find that degrees often enough become too great to bear. True?



posted on Aug, 23 2012 @ 02:12 PM
link   
reply to post by mexicocity
 
In Co-Masonic Orders men and women are both required to wear the regalia appropriate for their degree or office. Lodge cannot be opened until everyone is wearing their aprons.



posted on Aug, 23 2012 @ 03:05 PM
link   
reply to post by Pinocchio
 


In the United States, it is common to get to the 32nd degree of Scottish Rite Masonry fairly quickly. All one has to do is apply for the degrees, pay the required fees, and show up for the ceremonial induction.



posted on Aug, 23 2012 @ 03:07 PM
link   
reply to post by Pinocchio
 


Here is the way it works.

You petition the lodge.
your petition is read.
a month later it's voted on.
Then if you are elected, you receive your EA degree. (entered apprentice)
Once you do that, you have to learn a catechism that basically describes what you did in the EA degree and why.
Once you can recite that back word for word, (it's taught mouth to ear by another brother who takes his time to help you learn it) then you may progress to the next degree.
Then you receive your FC degree. (fellowcraft)
Same deal, you have to learn your work and recite it back.
Then you can be raised to the sublime degree of master mason.
At that point, you are as much of a mason as any man has ever been or will be. *note, this is important*

Once you are a master mason, should you decide you want to be an officer in the lodge, you have to recite your work for the third degree. Then you get a proficiency card. (this on not mandatory)

Once you are a master mason, you are free to explore the side orders.

Should you join the Scottish Rite, you will pay $300, go to the Valley(temple where meetings are held), and watch a series of plays acted out by masons who are already in that order. You have to see a minimum of five but you can see all 29 if you find them being put on like that at one time. (kind of rare)
It takes 1 weekend to go from 3rd degree to 32nd degree. In the USA Scottish Rite Southern Jurisdiction, you don't stop at 18 or any other degree, you get them all.

I agree with most that it cheapens the whole thing and this is why we continually try to explain to no avail that the degree means exactly jack spit.

In the UK and other places, the Scottish Rite is different and you must work at each degree, and most only go to 18th, with a very few going to 32nd. The York Rite uses titles and not degree numbers and they also work at each degree.

This is why I say people need to read more and talk less. We are the ones who live this stuff. We are happy to share what we know, but it gets real, real difficult not to snap when you are told how wrong you are by some guy with a friggin wooden nose.
edit on 23-8-2012 by network dude because: Augustusmasonicus is a beer hoarder. A crime of the highest level. Justice must be served!!



posted on Aug, 23 2012 @ 05:22 PM
link   
reply to post by Pinocchio
 

PM = Past Master (one who has presided as Worshipful Master over a Blue Lodge)

In American Scottish Rite Masonry, one can get all the Scottish Rite degree in a single weekend. Same for many York Rite bodies. I also waited a couple years before even going into the York Rite. I encourage everyone to wait to go into any appendant body so they can gain a better understanding of the Blue Lodge.

I would have joined the Scottish Rite after only 3.5-years, but I had some military duty get in the way and the military trumps my Masonic affiliation. I had much more of an interest in the York Rite and that is why I joined it first and that is why my focus is very much still there. I don't regret putting off the Scottish Rite, all good things come to those who wait.


I find that degrees often enough become too great to bear. True?

I have not experienced this.



posted on Aug, 23 2012 @ 06:57 PM
link   
How many Degrees are in Freemasonry? Some people say there are only 33 degrees, but I have met Freemasons in Higher Degrees than that.



posted on Aug, 23 2012 @ 07:08 PM
link   
reply to post by F6Zman
 

Freemasonry specifically surrounds the Blue Lodge which is just 3-degrees. Now if you want to go through the appendant bodies there are lots of degrees and in some bodies we refer to them as orders.



posted on Aug, 23 2012 @ 08:48 PM
link   

Originally posted by F6Zman
How many Degrees are in Freemasonry? Some people say there are only 33 degrees, but I have met Freemasons in Higher Degrees than that.

Probably not, unless they were in a clandestine organization. The only order that goes past 33 is the Rite of Memphis Misriam. They go up to 99, but they are not recognized by regular masonry.

Most 33rd's are older gentlemen who have devoted years of service to the rite.



posted on Aug, 23 2012 @ 10:21 PM
link   
Oh, good to know, thanks.



posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 03:44 AM
link   
reply to post by KSigMason
 


This may have been answered in the thread before but it's getting quite large now.

You mention two rites in this post as well referring to them as appendant bodies.

How many rites/ appendant bodies are there?

Are you able to become a member of all of them?

Is it anything like a College Fraternity Chapter where you can switch from Chapter to Chapter(if you change schools) but can only be tied to one at a time?

Or are Appendant bodies not similar to chapters and my analogy is dead wrong?



posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 11:30 AM
link   
reply to post by network dude
 


TY "network dude"... TY.

Wooden nose?!? ...


That was something I never knew about the order. Also... I do not research it as much.



posted on Aug, 24 2012 @ 01:05 PM
link   
reply to post by Pigraphia
 

When I say appendant bodies I mean every organization under the Masonic umbrella, not just the Scottish and York Rites. There is the White Shrine, Order of Amaranth, Order of the Eastern Star, Daughters of the Nile, Social Order of the Beauceant, York Rite (with its numerous honorary bodies), Scottish Rite (with its honorary bodies), Shriners, Grotto, Tall Cedars, Rosicrucian Society (technically not a York Rite invitation-only body), and the Youth Groups to which Masons can mentor and be a chaperone in. I'm sure I missed one, but I am on my phone right now.

There is also the Baldwyn Rite (England) and the Swedish Rite (Scandinavia), and the irregular (at least to recognized American Freemasonry) Rite of Memphis and Misraim.


Are you able to become a member of all of them?

If you have the time and meet the membership requirements, I'm sure you could be a member of all of them.


Is it anything like a College Fraternity Chapter where you can switch from Chapter to Chapter(if you change schools) but can only be tied to one at a time?

No, when you change residence, you are not required to change to the local Masonic organization. You can still attend just as a visitor, even if it is indefinite. As long as you pay your dues to your Lodge at your previous town, you'll be in good standing and allowed to visit.





new topics
top topics
 
7
<< 22  23  24    26  27  28 >>

log in

join