It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

NASA "Moon Bombing" mission -- DISAPPEARS

page: 29
71
<< 26  27  28    30  31  32 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:03 PM
link   
Somewhere in this massive thread, a poster expressed thoughts very similar to my own, which you all seem to miss completely.
Why is the moon suddenly being treated as this object in space which we know nothing about ? Not just by the US, but other countries as well.
Forgive me if I've dreamed this, but didn't we go there, in person over 40
years ago?
And after several visits, conducted tests, and samples brought home, decide there was nothing further of interest on this dead sphere ?
So why is it suddenly all new now ?
Something stinks here.




posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:06 PM
link   
We the humans are creating our own end..........especially the western who do crap like they are doing right now.



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:09 PM
link   
At the end of the day, the problem with this is that it appears that - yet again - we will have to take the word of an agency (which, for many of us has been proven to be completely untrustworthy) that what is says happened, actually happened.

The 'data' we are asked to accept is a few pixels which it would be easy to fake rather than the clear evidence we were told to expect and we are left a host of anomalies and unanswered questions, as usual.

Who knows what happened up there. I don't. And I'm not prepared to have faith in NASA's claims without harder evidence.

Poor show, at the very least.


[edit on 10-10-2009 by Malcram]



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:14 PM
link   

Originally posted by Ufokrazy
We the humans are creating our own end..........especially the western who do crap like they are doing right now.

That may well be the case ?
But why is all information now being treated as if we've never learned anything in the past at all ? Did we or did we not set foot on the moon over 40 years ago ?
I mean, Columbus discovered America.
It wasn't forgotten about , and then rediscovered 40 years later was it ?
And then rediscovered at suitable periodic intervals after that.
Something still stinks.



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:19 PM
link   
reply to post by ukmadmax
 

Well we rediscover Earth almost everyday dont we? A new kind of plant, a new cave, new ancient site, etc etc. We dont even know everything about the place we live on so how could we know everything about the moon. If we did in fact go there in person it probably has changed a lot since then. But you are right this whole mission stinks of deceit. But dont forget, what you do you the dark will be revealed in the light of day. So we will know one day.



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:26 PM
link   

Originally posted by acmpnsfal
reply to post by ukmadmax
 

Well we rediscover Earth almost everyday dont we? A new kind of plant, a new cave, new ancient site, etc etc. We dont even know everything about the place we live on so how could we know everything about the moon. If we did in fact go there in person it probably has changed a lot since then. But you are right this whole mission stinks of deceit. But dont forget, what you do you the dark will be revealed in the light of day. So we will know one day.

But the massive difference is, the Earth lives and breathes with life, so it is constantly changing.
A completely dead sphere doesn't change.
Does it ????



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:27 PM
link   
reply to post by Malcram
 

No.
There is a lot more data than just a few pixels. There is spectrographic data provided by both LCROSS and the LRO (possibly from Keck and other Earth based telescopes). There is the photometer data from LCROSS. There is the thermal data from both LCROSS and the LRO. There is the LAMP data from the LRO.

The visual data is only one small part of all the data gathered. It takes time to analyze all that data. It will be weeks before the first information becomes available and in the following months there will be more. There are scientists all over the world who will be carefully examining the data. If there is anything "fishy" about the data it will be instantly discovered.

Remember the Deep Impact mission? It took more than 6 months to confirm that water ice was ejected from Tempel 1 during the impact. If you want instant gratification you're not going to find it. Science doesn't often work that way.

[edit on 10/10/2009 by Phage]



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:35 PM
link   
Haven't scientists around the world been studying moon samples first hand for over 40 years ?
And what changes on a dead sphere ?



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:40 PM
link   
reply to post by ukmadmax
 

Who said it is a dead sphere? See once again you are acting as if we know everything about it. There is probably life there in some form. Life survives on Earth in very unlikely places so why not up there?



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:41 PM
link   
reply to post by ukmadmax
 

Small samples from 6 locations near the equator of the Moon. The Moon has 14,645,750 square miles of surface and it is not everywhere the same. The samples brought back have taught us a lot. There is a lot more we do not know.



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:48 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 



The pipeline for data transmission from LCROSS was 1megabit/sec


You are saying that LCROSS bandwidth were 54 times less than my cheap wireless router?

Why?



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:50 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


So if the moon is so
Full of these new and fascinating discoveries then why did it take so long for NASA to become interested in it once again? I would think the question of whether the moon has water should be so basic it would be the first question one seeks an answer to.



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:51 PM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Malcram
 

No.
There is a lot more data than just a few pixels. There is spectrographic data provided by both LCROSS and the LRO (possibly from Keck and other Earth based telescopes). There is the photometer data from LCROSS. There is the thermal data from both LCROSS and the LRO. There is the LAMP data from the LRO.

The visual data is only one small part of all the data gathered. It takes time to analyze all that data. It will be weeks before the first information becomes available and in the following months there will be more. There are scientists all over the world who will be carefully examining the data. If there is anything "fishy" about the data it will be instantly discovered.

Remember the Deep Impact mission? It took more than 6 months to confirm that water ice was ejected from Tempel 1 during the impact. If you want instant gratification you're not going to find it. Science doesn't often work that way.

[edit on 10/10/2009 by Phage]


As I said earlier, if the 'data' comes from sources independent of NASA, isn't based on assumption, and involves more than one or two pixels, then fair enough. So far we don't have that. So no, the requirements for 'proof' of the LCROSS impacts have not received "instant gratification", yet many people are prepared to accept already that it happened exactly as NASA said it did, despite the evidence NASA themselves predicted not materializing.

As many others have said, there is a lot that is distinctly fishy about this whole episode.

Speaking of which, how would you explain the apparent camera wobble during a 10 second shot of the lunar surface, from a craft that was supposed to be hurtling towards the lunar surface and was seconds from impact, yet which appears to hold the same altitude throughout the 10 seconds? 4:50 - 5:00.




posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:55 PM
link   

Originally posted by pterra
reply to post by Phage
 



The pipeline for data transmission from LCROSS was 1megabit/sec


You are saying that LCROSS bandwidth were 54 times less than my cheap wireless router?

Why?


I would like to hear Phage answer this -- however, my guess as to the reason for this has something to do with the distances. Your wireless router works across your house (maybe 100 feet) while LCROSS needs to send its signal 250,000 miles.

I suppose over that distance, there would be signal degradation that would need to be dealt with. According to the inverse square law, energy drops off exponentially with distance.

Phage -- is that the reason?

[edit on 10/10/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 05:05 PM
link   
reply to post by xEphon
 


Because NASA's current plan (which may change under the Obama administration) is to use the Moon as a stepping stone to send people to Mars.

That's the overall mission of the Constellation program which started back in 2005 (even the logo for the Constellation program has three "worlds" on it -- Earth, the Moon, and Mars).

As part of the Constellation Program, we needed to gather more information about the moon, due to the fact that they were planning on returning there with long-duration missions and Moon bases as a stepping stone to Mars. Therefore, missions such as LRO and LCROSS were developed to gather important data.

For example, LRO made detailed maps -- especially of the poles (where it is always daylight, which is important for long-duration manned missions of several weeks or more). LCROSS was looking for large supplies of water that could be used for fuel or for human use.

In short, NASA is studying the Moon more now because they planned on visiting it again within 10 years.


[edit on 10/10/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 05:10 PM
link   
reply to post by Malcram
 

I see no wobble in these versions:
www.youtube.com...
www.youtube.com...
www.youtube.com...

It would appear to be an artifact of the capture software used by that particular youtube user.



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 05:30 PM
link   
reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 

That's pretty much it. But actually, much higher speeds are possible. The LRO is capable of 100Mbps.

But the LRO stores its data before transmitting it. If bits are dropped the original data is still there to be resent until they get it right. LCROSS didn't have that luxury. The data has to get through on the first try. By limiting the transfer rate, fewer errors were generated.


[edit on 10/10/2009 by Phage]



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 05:37 PM
link   
Ok... I don't usually post but i keep an eye on things. But this required me to post something i think.

Please people, why are there so many assertions as to NASA presenting evidence. Really, you should all know by now that any info they give you is highly distorted or an outright lie for one reason or another. They are clearly holding back info and telling lies. The history of NASA and its collaboration with the government is there for us all to see. WAKE UP.



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 05:39 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


Again could you clarify me the exact time of the impact of the first craft in these videos?

If I saw the image from the second one,I would see the impact of the first.Isn't that right?


[edit on 10-10-2009 by kapodistrias]

[edit on 10-10-2009 by kapodistrias]



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 05:52 PM
link   
reply to post by kapodistrias
 

I can't tell you the exact time of the impact. But even if I could it wouldn't help. These are not videos, they are still photos taken about 2 seconds apart. If the impact occurred between two images it would not be visible.

One of the cameras did see it .
apod.nasa.gov...



new topics

top topics



 
71
<< 26  27  28    30  31  32 >>

log in

join