Hubble deep field like you've never seen it

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posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 10:19 AM
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reply to post by badmedia
 


Don't talk to me like I am dumb...

The reason those stadium lights look the same is because of the lenses in the camera, and because most lights at a stadium ARE the same..

The image I circled are supposed to be two different stars, or galaxies (not sure what) that are supposed to be in different locations, two different distances, and the picture is supposed to be taken from different angles, and two different perspectives. Glass is not flawless either and so two different perspectives should show two different artifacts.

I can point out all the differences too, but those differences can be caused by the slight rotation that one of them seems to have, and different blur effect.



[edit on 15-8-2009 by ALLis0NE]




posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 10:24 AM
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reply to post by ALLis0NE
 


Thanks for the info I always thought it was some kind of gas that made the cloud like appearances, good to know what really makes it look that way.

Do they actually look like that though ? I mean if we were to go there ourselves in a ship (somehow) would it look the same as it does in the pictures or would it look different ? (not sure if the hubble camera has some kind of filters to make space stuff look different to what it really looks like) Also aren't we looking at this nebula in the past due to the time it takes the light to travel such a vast distance ?



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 10:31 AM
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reply to post by badmedia
 


Here is an example I found...



Each light has different rays that I circled. Even though the lights are supposed to be identical, they have different "shadows" within the rays. I expect this from different stars/galaxies...



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 10:36 AM
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Originally posted by ALLis0NE
reply to post by badmedia
 


Don't talk to me like I am dumb...

The reason those stadium lights look the same is because of the lenses in the camera, and because most lights at a stadium ARE the same..

The image I circled are supposed to be two different stars, or galaxies (not sure what) that are supposed to be in different locations, two different distances, and the picture is supposed to be taken from different angles, and two different perspectives. Glass is not flawless either and so two different perspectives should show two different artifacts.

I can point out all the differences too, but those differences can be caused by the slight rotation that one of them seems to have, and different blur effect.


They are not galaxies, they are 2 different stars. It is because they are stars and much closer than where they are shooting that causes them to be so bright and have the glare to begin with.

You are noting similiarites in the glare, and calling it a fake. It's absolutely ridiculous because glares follow the same basic geometric patterns. I've seen tons of hubble images, and the glares on the closer stars is always like that.

Look at the image below. Different color, but has the same basic shape in the glare.



If you were talking about something other than glares, then fine. But it's the same glare on all the stars hubble picks up from stars in our own galaxy.



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 10:39 AM
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reply to post by ALLis0NE
 


And you can see the same exact thing in the picture you are calling a fake.

If you wanted, you could do the same exact thing you did on that picture and point out the similarities while at the same time ignoring the differences.

All you are doing is pointing out the similarities in 1 picture, and then pointing out the differences in the 2nd picture

Or, I could continue in your line of ignorance and just say the picture you are showing just has a bit of blur put in it.

Sorry, but it's dumb.




posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 10:42 AM
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Originally posted by Discotech
reply to post by ALLis0NE
 

Do they actually look like that though ? I mean if we were to go there ourselves in a ship (somehow) would it look the same as it does in the pictures or would it look different ? (not sure if the hubble camera has some kind of filters to make space stuff look different to what it really looks like)


No if you got closer to it, it would look way different. It wouldn't look like a cloud, it would look like the stars you see in the sky normally.

Much like your computer screen, it looks like solid colors from far, but when you get closer you see the individual pixels.

-add- But don't get me wrong, there is gases out there that help make it look like that, like hydrogen.


Originally posted by Discotech
Also aren't we looking at this nebula in the past due to the time it takes the light to travel such a vast distance ?


Yes the further away any object is to your eyes, the further into the past you are "seeing". Same for cameras.

So even if you hold your hand out in front of you, you are not looking at your hand in it's current state, you are looking at how it was in the past. Light is so fast though, you can't even tell on things as close as your hand.



[edit on 15-8-2009 by ALLis0NE]



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 10:43 AM
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Originally posted by lucentenigma
I zoomed in really close and look what I found!




Amazing what you found!



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 10:47 AM
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reply to post by badmedia
 


I think you have no clue what I'm talking about.

I'm not talking about the shape of the glare. I am fully aware the reason glares are similar shapes.

Actually I know things about light that would make you crap your pants.

I'm talking about each individual ray of the glare.

Just... never mind... I know what you are trying to say, but you don't know what I am trying to say.... so I might as well be talking to a wall.

b.t.w. I'm saying it looks fake. I'm not saying it IS fake...

[edit on 15-8-2009 by ALLis0NE]



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 10:52 AM
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reply to post by ALLis0NE
 


Can't you just put both stars in photoshop and place one image over the other to see if they're identical ?

I'd do it myself but I need to teach myself SQL & PhP so haven't the time


So how many years ago are we looking at in that picture of the nebula ?



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 11:16 AM
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Originally posted by Discotech
reply to post by ALLis0NE
 


Can't you just put both stars in photoshop and place one image over the other to see if they're identical ?


I already did, the main difference between the two is that one is slightly rotated to the right, and at the pixel level that makes a lot of small differences. However, the shadows within the rays are exactly identical, and if I rotated the one that isn't rotated, it would look exactly the same, with ZERO differences.

It doesn't matter anyway... Until I learn to trust perfect strangers, I will question everything.


Originally posted by Discotech
So how many years ago are we looking at in that picture of the nebula ?


Supposedly the Orion Nebula is around 1,350 light-years away. So that would mean you are seeing about 1,350 year's into the past.

...but some objects you see in the picture could be a lot further away. Meaning further into the past.



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 11:26 AM
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reply to post by ALLis0NE
 


Actually, the nebula colors are enhanced and generated.

hubblesite.org...



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 11:43 AM
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[edit on 15-8-2009 by MysterE]



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 11:54 AM
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reply to post by badmedia
 


Yes the colors are generated, I know.

The deep space images though, I swear, looks like they had a basic template star, and then just randomly pasted them in different locations. Changing size, and color, and rotation, but keeping the same template. It looks like they had different templates too, but used the same template multiple times.

I found this topic on ATS, I'll just probably post something there:
Hubble... Are the images being falsified?



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 12:01 PM
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reply to post by ALLis0NE
 


Oh b.t.w. I was 100% wrong on my above post. Some reason I was thinking of the Milky Way...

The Orion Nebula is made of gas clouds...
oops

en.wikipedia.org...

I need more sleep..


Milky Way image:


Just look how many stars there are! Looks like clouds.





[edit on 15-8-2009 by ALLis0NE]



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 12:25 PM
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Its so hard to comprehend.... each and everyone one of those is a galaxy....we havent even left our solar system! I feel so small....


great find, S&F for you.



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 12:30 PM
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anyone happen to notice this?



I zoomed in all the way in the 2nd link and was just scanning around looking for anything interesting... and then I found this. If you look closely, it looks as if these 3 galaxies are colliding. I showed it to a few members of my household and they agreed.

Notice the stretch marks between the 2 large galaxies. Also notice the slender tail coming from the smallest galaxy. You can just barely make it out.



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 12:52 PM
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reply to post by sliceNodice
 


Is this unusual?

Isnt there a lot of galaxies colliding?



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 01:10 PM
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The guy who says the galaxy is a large triangle ufo is ignorant IMO. It only looks triangle form that angle. Hold an elliptic item at an angle and you get the same affects.

The allegations of a fake star are valid I believe. The only way it could possibly do that is the fact that the telescope does not have an eye the size of a planet. It's small, and so things far away that are the same shape look a lot more similar. The stadium picture you took is more relative, and so differences are noticeable. But those two items basically have rays going at micro-degrees difference in angles.

I don't think people realize just how small an image this is taken from. Here's a reminder from a 3d model I just made:



img190.imageshack.us...

I hope this breathtaking visual aid gives you the awe necessary to comprehend the heavens. It certainly made my computer awe at it when it had to render the damn thing.



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 01:52 PM
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I believe Hubble is one of, if not the greatest, scientific instrument that has ever been built. Its amazing that Hubble can capture these images for all to see. I know how it works but its still almost magical that we can look out there and see galaxy after galaxy just floating out there. I know there are still skeptics that believe we are all alone in this universe but how do pictures like these not make you a believer. There has got to be other intelligent civilizations out there in those galaxies. Thanks for the links.



posted on Aug, 15 2009 @ 01:52 PM
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Heres a nice way to understand how the universe works.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

...Perhaps those galaxies are colliding, or maybe they are giving birth to a new galaxy or both, it's hard to tell.





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