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Do Nuclear Bombs Exist?

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posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 07:32 AM
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Appeal to emotion is a fallacy which uses the manipulation of the recipient's emotions, rather than valid logic, to win an argument. This kind of appeal to emotion is a type of red herring and encompasses several logical fallacies, including:

* Appeal to consequences
* Appeal to fear
* Appeal to flattery
* Appeal to pity
* Appeal to ridicule
* Appeal to spite
* Wishful thinking

Contents
* 1 Related fallacies
* 2 Examples
* 3 See also
* 4 External links

Related fallacies

Other types of fallacies may also overlap with or constitute an appeal to emotion, including:

* Ad hominem attacks
* Guilt by association
* Misleading vividness
* Slippery slope
* Two wrongs make a right (if arguing for revenge)
* Straw man

Examples
* "For the children"
* "Support our troops"


Emotions get the best of us, I admit it, but when thinking with a clear head I am able to discern. On to more witness statements. Keep the above in mind while reading.


Testimony of Akihiro Takahashi

Mr. Akihiro Takahashi was 14 years old, when the bomb was dropped. he was standing in line with other students of his junior high school, waiting for the morning meeting 1.4 km away from the center. He was under medical treatment for about year and half. And even today black nail grows at his finger tip, where a piece of glass was stuck.


MR. TAKAHASHI: We were about to fall in on the ground the Hiroshima Municipal Junior High School on this spot. The position of the school building was not so different from what it is today and the platform was not positioned, too. We were about to form lines facing the front, we saw a B-29 approaching and about fly over us. All of us were looking up the sky, pointing out the aircraft. Then the teachers came out from the school building and the class leaders gave the command to fall in. Our faces were all shifted from the direction of the sky to that of the platform. That was the moment when the blast came. And then the tremendous noise came and we were left in the dark. I couldn't see anything at the moment of explosion just like in this picture. We had been blown by the blast. Of course, I couldn't realize this until the darkness disappeared. I was actually blown about 10 m. My friends were all marked down on the ground by the blast just like this. Everything collapsed for as far as I could see. I felt the city of Hiroshima had disappeared all of a sudden. Then I looked at myself and found my clothes had turned into rags due to the heat. I was probably burned at the back of the head, on my back, on both arms and both legs. My skin was peeling and hanging like this. Automatically I began to walk heading west because that was the direction of my home. After a while, I noticed somebody calling my name. I looked around and found a friend of mine who lived in my town and was studying at the same school. His name was Yamamoto. He was badly burnt just like myself. We walked toward the river. And on the way we saw many victims. I saw a man whose skin was completely peeled off the upper half of his body and a woman whose eye balls were sticking out. Her whole baby was bleeding. A mother and her baby were lying with a skin completely peeled off. We desperately made a way crawling. And finally we reached the river bank. At the same moment, a fire broke out. We made a narrow escape from the fire. If we had been slower by even one second, we would have been killed by the fire. Fire was blowing into the sky becoming 4 or even 5m high. There was a small wooden bridge left, which had not been destroyed by the blast. I went over to the other side of the river using that bridge. But Yamamoto was not with me any more. He was lost somewhere. I remember I crossed the river by myself and on the other side, I purged myself into the water three times. The heat was tremendous . And I felt like my body was burning all over. For my burning body the cold water of the river was as precious as the treasure. Then I left the river, and I walked along the railroad tracks in the direction of my home. On the way, I ran into an another friend of mine, Tokujiro Hatta. I wondered why the soles of his feet were badly burnt. It was unthinkable to get burned there. But it was undeniable fact the soles were peeling and red muscle was exposed. Even I myself was terribly burnt, I could not go home ignoring him. I made him crawl using his arms and knees. Next, I made him stand on his heels and I supported him. We walked heading toward my home repeating the two methods. When we were resting because we were so exhausted, I found my grandfather's brother and his wife, in other words, great uncle and great aunt, coming toward us. That was quite coincidence. As you know, we have a proverb about meeting Buddha in Hell. My encounter with my relatives at that time was just like that. They seem to be the Buddha to me wandering in the living hell.

Afterwards I was under medical treatment for one year and half and I miraculously recovered. Out of sixty of junior high school classmates, only ten of us are alive today. Yamamoto and Hatta soon died from the acute radiation disease. The radiation corroded the bodies and killed them. I myself am still alive on this earth suffering after-effect of the bomb. I have to see regularly an ear doctor, an eye doctor, a dermatologist and a surgeon. I feel uneasy about my health every day. Further, on both of my hands, I have keloids. My injury was most serious on my right hand and I used to have terrible keloids at right here. I had it removed by surgery in 1954, which enabled me to move my wrist a little bit like this. For my four fingers are fixed just like this, and my elbow is fixed at one hundred twenty degrees and doesn't move. The muscle and bones are attached each other. Also the fourth finger of my right hand doesn't have a normal nail. It has a black nail. A piece of glass which was blown by the blast stuck here and destroyed the cells of the base of the finger now. That is why a black nail continues to grow and from now on, too, it will continue to be black and never become normal. Anyway I'm alive today together with nine of my classmates for this forty years. I've been living believing that we can never waste the depth of the victims. I've been living on dragging my body full of sickness and from time to time I question myself I wonder if it is worth living in such hardship and pain and I become desperate. But it's time I manage to pull myself together and I tell myself once my life was saved, I should fulfill my mission as a survivor in other words it has been and it is my belief that those who survived must continue to talk about our experiences. The hand down the awful memories to future generations representing the silent voices of those who had to die in misery. Throughout my life, I would like to fulfill this mission by talking about my experience both here in Japan and overseas.


People do not talk using language like this unless they are writers. Is every single witness a Pulitzer award winner? The depth and emotion pumped into these testimonies is way to overboard for the average witness of an event.

"Oh, the humanity..."

Granted we are speaking of a very dramatic event (if it were real), but these testimonies don't sound real in my opinion.

More to come...




posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 07:52 AM
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Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand
People do not talk using language like this unless they are writers.

Could you enlighten us as to how people DO talk, also perhaps their
choice of words were changed by the writer that typed the interview.
This does not prove on any level that there is no bomb. The interviewee
spoke and the writer typed it up. The Japanese language doesn't translate
literally to what you and I use everyday. I'm sure what you are reading
has been altered so that it makes some sense to you and I. Again, proof
that the Japanese language is not literal to our expressions.


Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand
Is every single witness a Pulitzer award winner?

No, again the writer is writing and the witness is being translated.


Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand
The depth and emotion pumped into these testimonies is way to overboard for the average witness of an event.

What methods are you using to determine the right amount of emotion.
Could you define the average witness?!


Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand
"Oh, the humanity..."

The same can be said for your posts.


Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand
Granted we are speaking of a very dramatic event (if it were real), but these testimonies don't sound real in my opinion.

Your opinion that they don't sound real is acceptable and is based on what
you feel. After all it is your opinion. However you are incorrect at thinking
that the alleged witnesses sat down and typed these out in their own words.



More to come...



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 08:00 AM
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Why Americans would tend to believe the bomb is real having never actually seen one detonate. This is called the "Bandwagon Effect" and is one of the biggest tools in propaganda. People will say, beyond the shadow of a doubt that something is true regardless of their own direct experience.


The Bandwagon effect, also known as social proof or "cromo effect" and closely related to opportunism, is the observation that people often do and believe things because many other people do and believe the same things.

The effect is often pejoratively called herding instinct
, particularly when applied to adolescents. People tend to follow the crowd without examining the merits of a particular thing. The bandwagon effect is the reason for the bandwagon fallacy's success.

The bandwagon effect is well-documented in behavioral psychology and has many applications. The general rule is that conduct or beliefs spread among people, as fads clearly do, with "the probability of any individual adopting it increasing with the proportion who have already done so". As more people come to believe in something, others also "hop on the bandwagon" regardless of the underlying evidence.

Origin of the phrase

The phrase "jump on the bandwagon" first appeared in American politics in 1848 when Dan Rice, a famous and popular circus clown of the time, used his bandwagon and its music to gain attention for Zachary Taylor's campaign appearances. As Taylor's campaign became more successful, more politicians strove for a seat on the bandwagon, hoping to be associated with the success. Later, during the time of William Jennings Bryan's 1900 presidential campaign, bandwagons had become standard in campaigns, and "jump on the bandwagon" was used as a derogatory term, implying that people were associating themselves with the success without considering what they associated themselves with.


More testimonies...


Testimony of Kinue Tomoyasu

Ms. Kinue Tomoyasu was 44 years old at the time of the A-bomb attack. She was at home, 5 kilometers from the hypocenter. She then entered Hiroshima City to search for her daughter. Previously her husband had died of illness and her only son was sent to a battle field. She was living with her only daughter. Ms. Tomoyasu was admitted to the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Victims Nursing Home thirteen years ago.


TOMOYASU: That morning I left home with my daughter. She was working at the industrial Research Institute. Then an air-raid warning was issued. I went back home, but my daughter insisted, ``I'm going to the office.'' even though the air-raid warning had been issued. She reached the train station. The trains were always late in the morning, but they were on time that day. She took the train and when she got off at the station, she was hit by the A-bomb. I went inside my home since the warning was still on. I tucked myself in bed and waited for the warning to be lifted.

After the warning was lifted, I got up and folded the bedding, put it back into the closet, and opened the window. As I opened the window, there came the flash. it was so bright, a ten or hundred or thousand times brighter than a camera flash bulb. The flash was piercing my eyes and my mind went blank. The glass from the windows was shattered all over the floor. I was lying on the floor, too. When I came to, I was anxious to know what happened to my daughter, Yatchan. I looked outside the window and saw one of my neighbors. He was standing out there. I called, ``Mr. Okamoto, what was that flash?'' He said, ``That was a killer beam.'' I became more anxious. I thought, ``I must go, I must go and find her.'' I swept up the pieces of glass, put my shoes on, and took my air-raid hood with me. I made my way to a train station near Hiroshima. I saw a young girl coming my way. Her skin was dangling all ever and she was naked. She was muttering, ``Mother, water,mother,water.'' I took a look at her. I thought she might be my daughter, but she wasn't. I didn't give her any water. I am sorry that I didn't. But my mind was full, worrying about my daughter. I ran all the way to Hiroshima Station. Hiroshima Station was full of people. Some of them were dead, and many of them were lying on the ground, calling for their mothers and asking for water. I went to Tokiwa Bridge. I had to cross the bridge to get to my daughter's office. But there was a rope for tote across the bridge. And the people there told me, ``You can't go beyond here today.'' I protested, ``My daughter's office is over there. Please let me go through.'' They told me, ``No.'' Some men were daring to make the way through, but I couldn't go beyond it. I thought she might be on a way back home. I returned home, but my daughter was not back yet.

INTERVIEWER: Did you see the large cloud?

TOMOYASU: No, I didn't see the cloud.

INTERVIEWER: You didn't see the mushroom cloud?

TOMOYASU: I didn't see the Mushroom cloud. I was trying to find my daughter. They told me I couldn't go beyond the bridge. I thought she might be back home, so I went back as far as Nikitsu Shrine. Then, the black rain started falling from the sky. And I wondered what it was. And it was what's called the black rain.

INTERVIEWER: Can you tell us what was the black rain like?

TOMOYASU: It was like a heavy rain. And I had my air-raid hood on, so I didn't get it on my head fortunately, but it fell on my hands. And I ran and ran. I waited for her with the windows open. I stayed awake all night waiting and waiting for her, but she didn't come back. About six thirty on the morning of the 7th, Mr. Ishido, whose daughter was working at the same office with my daughter, came around. He called out asking for the Tomoyasu's house. I went outside calling to him, ``It's here, over here!'' Mr.Ishido came up to me and said, ``Quick! Get some clothes and go for her. Your daughter is at the bank of the Ota River.'' I said, ``Thank you, thank you very much. Is she still alive?'' He said, ``She is alive,'' and added, ``I'll show you the way.'' I took a yukata with me. My neighbors offered me a stretcher. And I started running at full speed. People followed me and said, ``Slow down! Be careful not to hurt yourself!'' But still, I hurried as fast as I could. When I reached the Tokiwa Bridge, there were soldiers lying on the ground. Around Hiroshima Station, I saw more people lying dead, more on the morning of the 7th than on the 6th. When I reached the river bank, I couldn't tell who was who. I kept wondering where my daughter was. But then, she cried for me, ``Mother!'' I recognized her voice. I found her in a horrible condition. Her face looked terrible. And she still appears in my dreams like that sometimes. When I met her, she said, ``There shouldn't be any war.'' The first thing she said to me was ``Mother, it took you so I couldn't do anything for her. My neighbors went back home. They had wounded family members as well. I was all by myself, and I didn't know what to do. There were maggots in her wounds and a sticky yellowish pus, a white watery liquid coming out her wounds and a sticky yellowish liquid. I didn't know what was going on.

INTERVIEWER: So you tried to remove the maggots from your daughter's body?

TOMOYASU: Yes. But her skin was just peeling right off. The maggots were coming out all over. I couldn't wipe them off. I thought it would be too painful. I picked off some maggots, though. She asked me what I was doing and I told her, ``Oh, it's nothing.'' She nodded at my words. And nine hours later, she died.

INTERVIEWER: You were holding her in your arms all that time?

TOMOYASU: Yes, on my lap. I had had bedding and folded on the floor, but I held her in my arms. when I held her on my lap, she said, ``I don't want to die.'' I told her, ``Hang on Hang on.'' She said, ``I won't die before my brother comes home.'' But she was in pain and she kept crying, ``Brother. Mother.''
Continued...



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 08:04 AM
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On August 15th, I held her funeral. And around early October, my hair started to come out. I wondered what was happening to me, but all my hair was disappearing. In November, I become bald. Then, purple spots started to appear around my neck, my body and my arms, and on the inner parts of my thighs, a lot of them, all over, the purple spots all over my body. I had a high fever of forty degrees. I was shivering and I couldn't consult the doctor. I still had a fever when I was admitted here for a while, but now I don't have a fever so often.

INTERVIEWER: After your son returned home from the war, what did he do?

TOMOYASU: He came back in February of 1946, and he took care of me. When he heard how his sister died, he said he felt so sorry for her. He told me he hated war. I understand. Many of his friends had died in the war. He told me he felt sorry that he survived. He was just filled with regret. My son got malaria during the war, also. He suffered a lot. I don't know why, but he became neurotic and killed himself, finally, by jumping in front of a train in October. I was left alone. I had to go through hardships, living alone. I have no family. I joined the white chrysanthemum organization at Hiroshima University, pledging to donate my body upon death for medical education and research. My registration number is number 1200 I'm ready. I'm ready now to be summoned by God at any moment. But God doesn't allow me to come his side yet. If it were not for the war, my two children would not have died. If it were not for the war, I wouldn't have to stay at an institution like this. I suppose the three of us would have been living together in happiness. Ah, it is so hard on me.


How did her daughter have maggots coming out of her flesh? It was one day after.

Again, these testimonies do not sound probable. They are written like a movie...or propaganda.

Not one of these testimonies has any animosity towards America, but that's not how the Americans saw Pearl Harbor. I guess the Japanese are just VERY forgiving people.



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 08:41 AM
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Originally posted by cluckerspud

Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand


Could you enlighten us as to how people DO talk, also perhaps their
choice of words were changed by the writer that typed the interview.
This does not prove on any level that there is no bomb. The interviewee
spoke and the writer typed it up. The Japanese language doesn't translate
literally to what you and I use everyday. I'm sure what you are reading
has been altered so that it makes some sense to you and I. Again, proof
that the Japanese language is not literal to our expressions.


I said nothing of the Japanese language, nor that they themselves were writing it. An interviewer is interviewing them.

Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand
Is every single witness a Pulitzer award winner?


No, again the writer is writing and the witness is being translated.


Covered that. I would have to assume that he is taking their accounts. If he is indeed embellishing, as you suggest, then what good is the testimony?

Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand
The depth and emotion pumped into these testimonies is way to overboard for the average witness of an event.


What methods are you using to determine the right amount of emotion. Could you define the average witness?!


I'm using common sense. We aren't dealing with "Boston Legal" here, we are dealing with frail old Japanese people recalling an event. I simply find it odd the amount of non important emotionally based writing there is.

If you were the witness to a car accident, I would ask you what happened. If you went into overly elaborate details, I would question your motives for so much information. Standard investigative technique. Here is an example.

"As I saw the vehicle rounding the corner time appeared to slow down. What appeared to be a sliding mass of steal and glass to the perception of my travel weary eyes, came in to my view. I noticed it was sending sparks into every direction like an all to familiar firework display that I recall as a child I loved, I could only draw the conclusion that the driver must be in serious trouble and in danger of ending their days upon our glorious planet earth"

That would be a weird testimony, in my opinion. Too much information. A normal witness would just say he saw the car crash.

Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand
"Oh, the humanity..."


The same can be said for your posts.


Thank you, I needed a good example of dis info tactic. You just provided it.


Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand
Granted we are speaking of a very dramatic event (if it were real), but these testimonies don't sound real in my opinion.


Your opinion that they don't sound real is acceptable and is based on what you feel. After all it is your opinion. However you are incorrect at thinking that the alleged witnesses sat down and typed these out in their own words.


Yes, I have my opinion and that is these are phony testimonies written by propaganda agents to encourage the belief in nuclear weapons that don't exist, cause after all it is my opinion.

Your last statement has nothing to do with anything I've posted, but it is another great example of dis info seeing as how I never said anything about who wrote them only how they are written.

Back to more testimonies...



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 09:04 AM
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Welcome new operative cluckerspud. It would appear from your post that you believe in time travel. And yet you advocate the existence of nuclear bombs.

As for my interest in the possibility that nuclear bombs do not exist, it was my own idea, though that is not terribly important, is it? Except that it may suggest that I am a critical thinker, possibly unlike you who work for the military-industrial complex.



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 09:08 AM
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Another testimony, highly emotionally charged with vivid imagery and exact details.

The level of detail that these folks can remember, after a NUCLEAR BOMB just fell is stunning considering most of them were knocked unconscious.

Keep below in mind as you read these testimonies. More testimonies follow this quick article.


For the children (politics)
The phrase "for the children", or "think of the children," is an appeal to emotion and can be used to support an irrelevant conclusion (both logical fallacies) when used in an argument. The phrase may also be seen as a valid appeal to a moral value that may be the basis for logical argument or action.

Reasoning

1. X is good for children
2. Anything good for children is good
3. Therefore, X is good

Logical fallacy

"For the children" suffers from the logical fallacies of appeal to emotion and irrelevant conclusion. This argument can simply appeal to the listener's emotion by connecting an argument to innocent children that many people feel an instinctual need to protect. Using such an argument may not even be related to the topic. For example, a politician could claim that a policy to ban oil drilling would protect the children, even if the oil drilling was in the ocean. In this example, the politician is appealing to others' emotional desire to protect children. However, any impact it would have on children would be indirect, so "protecting the children" with this policy is rather irrelevant. It also can contain an abdication of responsibility of "think of the children, so I don't have to".




Testimony of Akiko Takakura
Ms. Akiko Takakura was 20 years old when the bomb fell. She was in the Bank of Hiroshima, 300 meters away from the hypocenter. Ms. Takakura miraculously escaped death despite over 100 lacerated wounds on her back. She is one of the few survivors who was within 300 meters of the hypocenter. She now runs a kindergarten and she relates her experience of the atomic bombing to children.

TAKAKURA: After the air-raid the alarm was called off, I walked from Hatchobori to the Bank of Hiroshima in Kamiya-cho. I arrived at the bank some time around 8:15 or so, and signed my name in the attendance book. When I was doing my morning routine, dusting the desks and things like that, the A-bomb was dropped. All I remember was that I saw something flash suddenly.

INTERVIEWER: Can you explain the flash?

TAKAKURA: Well, it was like a white magnesium flash. I lost consciousness right after or almost at the same time I saw the flash. When I regained consciousness, I found myself in the dark. I heard my friends, Ms. Asami, crying for her mother. Soon after, I found out that we actually had been attacked. Afraid of being caught by a fire, I told Ms. Asami to run out of the building. Ms. Asami, however, just told me to leave her and to try to escape by myself because she thought that she couldn't make it anywhere. She said she couldn't move. I said to her that I couldn't leave her, but she said that she couldn't even stand up. While we were talking, the sky started to grow lighter. Then, I heard water running in the lavatory. Apparently the water pipes had exploded. So I drew water with my helmet to pour over Ms. Asami's head again and again. She finally regained consciousness fully and went out of the building with me. We first thought to escape to the parade grounds, but we couldn't because there was a huge sheet of fire in front of us. So instead, we squatted down in the street next to a big water pool for fighting fires, which was about the size of this table. Since Hiroshima was completely enveloped in flames, we felt terribly hot and could not breathe well at all. After a while, a whirlpool of fire approached us from the south. It was like a big tornado of fire spreading over the full width of the street. Whenever the fire touched, wherever the fire touched, it burned. It burned my ear and leg, I didn't realize that I had burned myself at that moment, but I noticed it later.

INTERVIEWER: So the fire came towards you?

TAKAKURA: Yes, it did. The whirlpool of fire that was covering the entire street approached us from Ote-machi. So, everyone just tried so hard to keep away from the fire. It was just like a living hell. After a while, it began to rain. The fire and the smoke made us so thirsty and there was nothing to drink, no water, and the smoke even disturbed our eyes. As it began to rain, people opened their mouths and turned their faces towards the sky and try to drink the rain, but it wasn't easy to catch the rain drops in our mouths. It was a black rain with big drops.

INTERVIEWER: How big were the rain drops?

TAKAKURA: They were so big that we even felt pain when they dropped onto us. We opened our mouths just like this, as wide as possible in an effort to quench our thirst. Everybody did the same thing. But it just wasn't enough. Someone, someone found an empty can and held it to catch the rain.

INTERVIEWER: I see. Did the black rain actually quench your thirst?

TAKAKURA: No, no it didn't. Maybe I didn't catch enough rain, but I still felt very thirsty and there was nothing I could do about it. What I felt at that moment was that Hiroshima was entirely covered with only three colors. I remember red, black and brown, but, but, nothing else. Many people on the street were killed almost instantly. The fingertips of those dead bodies caught fire and the fire gradually spread over their entire bodies from their fingers. A light gray liquid dripped down their hands, scorching their fingers. I, I was so shocked to know that fingers and bodies could be burned and deformed like that. I just couldn't believe it. It was horrible. And looking at it, it was more than painful for me to think how the fingers were burned, hands and fingers that would hold babies or turn pages, they just, they just burned away. For a few years after the A-bomb was dropped, I was terribly afraid of fire. I wasn't even able to get close to fire because all my senses remembered how fearful and horrible the fire was, how hot the blaze was, and how hard it was to breathe the hot air. It was really hard to breathe. Maybe because the fire burned all the oxygen, I don't know. I could not open my eyes enough because of the smoke, which was everywhere. Not only me but everyone felt the same. And my parts were covered with holes.


Again, it is of my opinion, that when someone is asked a question that they answer it, not go into a 3 page thesis.

Example from above. The interviewer asks the person what the black rain was like. I believe a normal person would say , "Well it's black and doesn't taste good", only we get the details of everything having nothing to do with the question, just more emotion to suck you in. Hey it worked...do it for the children.

I know dis info people will pick that apart trying to destroy my character instead of addressing the issues brought up, so I appeal to folks to read them and decide for yourselves.

More to come...



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 09:20 AM
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Your right LTRU - these "testimonies" seem suspicious.



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 09:34 AM
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reply to post by letthereaderunderstand
 


I hope you're not suggesting that the Japanese military surrendered because the allies caused volcanic eruptions staged to look like an aerial attack, by nuclear weapons. Revisionist history is a dangerous and slippery slope.



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 09:42 AM
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reply to post by letthereaderunderstand
 


Is there anything that you believe in that you haven't personally seen? You seem pretty willing to accept information that coincides with your opinions and theories, without being a first hand witness. How are we to know anything in history to have actually occurred, if we all must be eyewitnesses? Your notion of the "bandwagon" effect is an unrealistic standard.



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 10:10 AM
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Originally posted by BlueRaja
reply to post by letthereaderunderstand
 


I hope you're not suggesting that the Japanese military surrendered because the allies caused volcanic eruptions staged to look like an aerial attack, by nuclear weapons. Revisionist history is a dangerous and slippery slope.


I said, I find it interesting that both locations have active volcanos.

Make of it what you want, but please don't revise what I've said, it's a slippery slope.



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 10:15 AM
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Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand

Originally posted by BlueRaja
reply to post by letthereaderunderstand
 


I hope you're not suggesting that the Japanese military surrendered because the allies caused volcanic eruptions staged to look like an aerial attack, by nuclear weapons. Revisionist history is a dangerous and slippery slope.


I said, I find it interesting that both locations have active volcanos.

Make of it what you want, but please don't revise what I've said, it's a slippery slope.



I wasn't putting words in your mouth, but.....I was commenting on the implications of what you were saying.

I suppose this is a US Navy undersea volcano test-

www.wetasschronicles.com...

[edit on 9-1-2009 by BlueRaja]

[edit on 9-1-2009 by BlueRaja]



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 10:24 AM
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My Japanese wife assures me that there is no doubt that nuclear bombs exist.



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 10:28 AM
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How old is your Japanese wife?



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 10:29 AM
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Originally posted by BlueRaja
reply to post by letthereaderunderstand
 


Is there anything that you believe in that you haven't personally seen? You seem pretty willing to accept information that coincides with your opinions and theories, without being a first hand witness. How are we to know anything in history to have actually occurred, if we all must be eyewitnesses? Your notion of the "bandwagon" effect is an unrealistic standard.


1st Question
Nope.

2nd Statement
That is your opinion. I respect it.

3rd Question
We don't know if anything actually occurred. We trust that it did. That doesn't mean it happened, but it does mean as long as people believe it did, then it did. Do you think people are going to know your name a thousand years from now? You won't why should they. It will be as if you never existed and for all intents and purposes...you didn't.

4th Statement
When people believe something that they have not witnessed at the word of someone else they are Jumping on the bandwagon. You don't think that applies? If all of your friends were jumping off a bridge, would you do it too?

Peace



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 10:33 AM
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Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand





4th Statement
When people believe something that they have not witnessed at the word of someone else they are Jumping on the bandwagon. You don't think that applies? If all of your friends were jumping off a bridge, would you do it too?

Peace


That's why you rely on mulitple sources, and do research. Do you believe what your parents told you about when they were growing up, or would that be another case of jumping on the bandwagon, since you didn't witness it?

[edit on 9-1-2009 by BlueRaja]



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 10:37 AM
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reply to post by BlueRaja
 


Thank you BlueRaja.

The implications are horrendous.

Your link is broken or not coming up, but I would be happy to see it.

Peace



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 10:38 AM
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This like that thing if tree falls in woods and no one is there to hear it does it make a sound. Of course it made sound even if no one did hear it.

[edit on 9-1-2009 by googolplex]



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 10:49 AM
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Originally posted by BlueRaja
Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand





4th Statement
When people believe something that they have not witnessed at the word of someone else they are Jumping on the bandwagon. You don't think that applies? If all of your friends were jumping off a bridge, would you do it too?

Peace


That's why you rely on mulitple sources, and do research. Do you believe what your parents told you about when they were growing up, or would that be another case of jumping on the bandwagon, since you didn't witness it?

[edit on 9-1-2009 by BlueRaja]


Yes multiple sources. I'm listing many and have done research and will continue too, till I put it to rest.


If that info was meant for me, I would be my parents, but all I need to know is, the people I grew up with are who I witnessed them to be and that is all I am accountable for. Their stories belong to them.

I'm not being unreasonable here and I have not called one person a liar. I have stated my opinions and that is all. Again, I respect yours.

Peace



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 10:51 AM
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Originally posted by googolplex
This like that thing if tree falls in woods and no one is there to hear it does it make a sound. Of corse it made sound even if no one did hear it.


Completely irrelevant. I have seen a tree fall and heard it. Do I need to know if it does the same thing when I am not there? Nope


[edit on 9-1-2009 by letthereaderunderstand]







 
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