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List of security clearances

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posted on May, 11 2006 @ 02:00 AM
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Originally posted by Pyros
Actually.......when referencing SCI compartments, the full codeword for the "B" compartment used to be classified Confidential.

However, the B compartment was discontinued as of last March, and (alomost) all B information is controlled under TK.

Pyros


Interesting. I was told by the people who briefed me into various SCI, the codeword associated with the trigraph is classified to the same level as the compartment.
So hypothetically if you had a compartment that was TS/SPF, the trigraph "SPF" is not classified and in fact you're allowed to tell perspective future employers you held a TS/SPF clearance, but the word associated with it - in this made up case, "sugar plum fairy", is classified top secret/sugar plum fairy. Maybe it's different depending on the compartment ?

What's your source on Yankee Fire being an investigation criteria for working at NRO?
Any idea on how it deviates from a Yankee White background check ?
Google turns up a few hits listing it as a generic type of security clearance but with no additional information.


[edit on 11-5-2006 by Schaden]




posted on May, 11 2006 @ 08:27 AM
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Originally posted by Schaden
Interesting. I was told by the people who briefed me into various SCI, the codeword associated with the trigraph is classified to the same level as the compartment.
So hypothetically if you had a compartment that was TS/SPF, the trigraph "SPF" is not classified and in fact you're allowed to tell perspective future employers you held a TS/SPF clearance, but the word associated with it - in this made up case, "sugar plum fairy", is classified top secret/sugar plum fairy. Maybe it's different depending on the compartment ?

What's your source on Yankee Fire being an investigation criteria for working at NRO?
Any idea on how it deviates from a Yankee White background check ?
Google turns up a few hits listing it as a generic type of security clearance but with no additional information.
[edit on 11-5-2006 by Schaden]


Your referring to Special Access Programs, not SCI. In SCI, the "compartment" name is Unclassified (for the 4 major compartments, anyways). They are Sensitive Inteligence (SI) (now simply referred to as "COMINT"), Talent-Keyhole (TK), Gamma (G), and HUMINT Control System (H or HCS). As I previously said, the old "B" compartment is now no longer used.

In some SAPs, the actual "codeword" or "nickname" is classified at the level of the program. Program participants are not allowed to reveal the codeword to those persons not formally indoctrinated.

However, this is not necessarily true with all SAPs. In "acknowledged" programs, the codeword or nickname is generally Unclassified, although most people refrain from using it gratuitously. For example, "Senior Trend" is an example of an actual SAP with an Unclassified (and well known) nickname.



posted on May, 12 2006 @ 12:13 PM
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Originally posted by Pyros
Your referring to Special Access Programs, not SCI. In SCI, the "compartment" name is Unclassified (for the 4 major compartments, anyways). They are Sensitive Inteligence (SI) (now simply referred to as "COMINT"), Talent-Keyhole (TK), Gamma (G), and HUMINT Control System (H or HCS). As I previously said, the old "B" compartment is now no longer used.

In some SAPs, the actual "codeword" or "nickname" is classified at the level of the program. Program participants are not allowed to reveal the codeword to those persons not formally indoctrinated.

However, this is not necessarily true with all SAPs. In "acknowledged" programs, the codeword or nickname is generally Unclassified, although most people refrain from using it gratuitously. For example, "Senior Trend" is an example of an actual SAP with an Unclassified (and well known) nickname.


Well in this case, I'm positive I'm referring to an SCI compartment.
Maybe the names of the more common ones, like talent keyhole are not classified but I clearly remember being told when I was briefed, the name of the compartment was classified to the level of the compartment itself. I've read there are hundreds of different SCI compartments. I was only formally briefed into one, but in the course of my job handled material with multiple SCI caveats.


So what is your source for Yankee Fire as an investigation for the NRO ?



posted on May, 12 2006 @ 12:16 PM
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Originally posted by Schaden

Originally posted by Pyros
Your referring to Special Access Programs, not SCI. In SCI, the "compartment" name is Unclassified (for the 4 major compartments, anyways). They are Sensitive Inteligence (SI) (now simply referred to as "COMINT"), Talent-Keyhole (TK), Gamma (G), and HUMINT Control System (H or HCS). As I previously said, the old "B" compartment is now no longer used.

In some SAPs, the actual "codeword" or "nickname" is classified at the level of the program. Program participants are not allowed to reveal the codeword to those persons not formally indoctrinated.

However, this is not necessarily true with all SAPs. In "acknowledged" programs, the codeword or nickname is generally Unclassified, although most people refrain from using it gratuitously. For example, "Senior Trend" is an example of an actual SAP with an Unclassified (and well known) nickname.


Well in this case, I'm positive I'm referring to an SCI compartment.
Maybe the names of the more common ones, like talent keyhole are not classified but I clearly remember being told when I was briefed, the name of the compartment was classified to the level of the compartment itself. I've read there are hundreds of different SCI compartments. I was only formally briefed into one, but in the course of my job handled material with multiple SCI caveats.


So what is your source for Yankee Fire as an investigation for the NRO ?


Well, ther is no doubt that once you start getting down into the nitty-gritty of specific SCI compartments (single operations, single sources, etc.) the codeword is probably classified. I was speaking on a much broader level.

The YANKEE FIRE thing is common knowledge to those in my profession.



posted on May, 12 2006 @ 12:22 PM
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So can you say in generic terms what field you work in ?
I was just curious about the Yankee Fire thing.

I had heard of Yankee White before. It came up as a topic of conversation
when my old job was recruiting people for White House duty.
My supervisor informed me how he wasn't even eligible for a Yankee White
investigation, because he admitted to experimenting w/ cannabis as a teenager.
And that even one time use was disqualifying. Along with the usual absence of foreign influence/good character that a regular TS/SCI clearance requires.

And I've read on google Yankee White basically clears you for "anything" for which you have a need to know. Is Yankee Fire even more stringent ? What do they lock you up in a room and beat you up to see how long before you spill the beans ?
Do you carry cyanide capsules around ? rofl


[edit on 12-5-2006 by Schaden]



posted on May, 12 2006 @ 05:37 PM
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Originally posted by Schaden
My supervisor informed me how he wasn't even eligible for a Yankee White
investigation, because he admitted to experimenting w/ cannabis as a teenager.

I know a few Marines that enlisted with a drug waiver (stating they have smoked before and it's in their file) and are now working at Camp David, White House Comm Office, HMX-1 and other jobs that requires one to have YW. I think it's taken on a case by case basis....just cause you've smoked up before that doesn't mean you are not able to get a YW.



And I've read on google Yankee White basically clears you for "anything" for which you have a need to know.

Yankee white clears someone to work around or with the president and gives them access to certain information that pertains to the president that they might need for their job...schedule, combos to offices, motorcade routes, etc...

Sporty



posted on May, 12 2006 @ 09:31 PM
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Surely there has to be more than just that list. It seems like there would be a higher clearance than Yankee White. I did a little research on Yankee White, and it's the clearance given to the personnel that work with the President. But since there are clearance levels above the President's, shouldn't there be higher clearance levels than Yankee White? Or did I miss something?



posted on May, 13 2006 @ 03:12 PM
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Originally posted by SportyMB

I know a few Marines that enlisted with a drug waiver (stating they have smoked before and it's in their file) and are now working at Camp David, White House Comm Office, HMX-1 and other jobs that requires one to have YW. I think it's taken on a case by case basis....just cause you've smoked up before that doesn't mean you are not able to get a YW.

Sporty


Well it maybe on a case by case basis, but the person who told me that knew his stuff. He was in his mid thirties and already made E-9. #1 ranked NCO at the command, CMS custodian, etc...
He wasn't the type to say something without reason. Of course this was a over a decade ago and the standards may have changed. I hear they are even allowing convicted felons to enlist nowadays.
I know even for a TS/SCI they don't just carte blanche give waivers for drug use. The standard for experimentation is less than 10 instances or something. If you were a total head in high school, smoking pot everyday, dropping '___' and admitted as much even if you had quit years ago, I don't think they would clear you for even a basic TS clearance. But maybe if you "tried it once" at a party they would still pass you for YW.
What is HMX-1 ?



[edit on 13-5-2006 by Schaden]



posted on May, 13 2006 @ 05:11 PM
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Originally posted by Schaden
But maybe if you "tried it once" at a party they would still pass you for YW.
What is HMX-1 ?


There are many people with clearances that have drug waivers, and there are also many people that have not been approved for clearances and even had them kanked because during the SSBI or whatever they found out that they have tried pot and it was'nt in their record....in other words, they lied when they enlisted during the 'moment of truth'. Integrity is huge factor in determining if someone gets a clearance or not.

HMX-1 (Marine 1) is the presidential helo squadron based at Quantico, Va.


[edit on 13/5/2006 by SportyMB]



posted on May, 15 2006 @ 08:55 AM
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One thing that I think everyone should realize is that there is a distinct difference between a background investigation, a security clearance, and access to a specific kind of classified information.

Background investigations (SSBI, YF, YG, etc.) are not security clearances. They are the data gathering process upon which a clearance determination is made. They vary in scope, depth, and detail depending on what end user (gov't agency) is requesting the security clearance. Some BI's are very cursory (such as the National Agency Check, or "NAC"), and primarily subsist of on-line files checks and so forth. Other kinds of BI's are much more detailed, and investigators will put their shoes on the street and check out your past personally.

Once the BI is complete, then a determination can be made regarding a candidates eligibility for access to classfied information. This is the important part. Eligibility criteria varies between end users. For example, while Joe Schmoe may be eligible for access to Top Secret information in the eyes of DSS, he may not be eligible for access to SCI in the eyes of NSA, for various reasons. The process of determining eligibility is called "adjudication". Adjudication is not a cut-and-dry process, and human factors on both sides of the process cause lots of variations.

Adjudicators look at the "whole person" and then make decisions about eligibilily. There are printed manuals that describe the basic guidelines for determining trustworthiness and allegiance, and the DCID 6/4 is the best example.

Once a person is detrmined to be "eligible" for access, then the local command or company can grant access at it's discretion, based upon need-to-know. So you see, a security clearance really means nothing, as it can be turned on and off depending on what you are doing at any given time. It's your (successful) background investigation and eligibility which is important. That is your "pedigree" for working with classified information. When I interview a potential new-hire, I don't care if he tells me he has been cleared this-or-that in the past. I look up his current BI and eligibility data in the system.





[edit on 15-5-2006 by Pyros]



posted on Sep, 30 2006 @ 07:35 AM
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maybe we forget some of clearance...
here some..
UMBRA
G2-72
STELLER
COSMIC /ATOMAL/
ASTRAL
SUB-ASTRAL
Q
BLACK (GR-7)
STITK
ULTRA-4
ULTRA-7
TRIAD
UMT
ULTRA
RYOLITE-38
---------------------------------------------
if anybody have some outher clearance list"s please e-mail me...
i"m collecting secret clearance,so if somebody have outher "unknown" clearance plese e-mail me
thax in advance..



posted on Oct, 2 2006 @ 07:48 AM
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Originally posted by OBSERVER X
maybe we forget some of clearance...
here some..

ULTRA
RYOLITE-38


These are program clearances! What you have here is a SAP list!

Tim



posted on Oct, 7 2006 @ 11:30 AM
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At what user level would you begin to see these "higher" clearance types?

My local level 5(or 4 since I don't really know) has left for a better job, so i'm hoping for a good replacement to carry on with the advice I need at work.

I talked to some people this past week and couldn't believe that they are still using EPSQ. I thought that using EQIP was mandatory September 30th of last year?

Anyways, thanks to Schaden and Pyros for mentioning some good info. I may have to rely on you guys for help since my local "go to" person is gone. Luckily this person is moving to OPM, so my present/future job should become a little bit better now that I know someone there.



posted on Oct, 7 2006 @ 01:12 PM
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Edit: Been covered


[edit on 7-10-2006 by Orbital777]



posted on Oct, 7 2006 @ 01:20 PM
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Originally posted by Azeari of the Radiant Eye
There's alot of errata and misunderstanding contained in this thread.
I started to compile it all but have run out of time!

For starters:

- There are only three US classification levels: CONFIDENTIAL, SECRET, TOP SECRET (NATO has an extra one, RESTRICTED, which is below CONFIDENTIAL)

- Many of the stated levels are actually Compartments (TK is an example); these are used to restrict the number of people who have access to certain data, the theory being that no one person has access to everything. There is really no hiearchy of compartments, rather some just have less people "read in" to them than others, could be a handful up to thousands. Material can be compartmented at any of the three classification levels.

- Referring to the original list, most of those "clearances" listed aren't clearances at all, they're background investigation standards. For example, no one is "cleared" SSBI; SSBI is the basic backgound investigation required for a TOP SECRET clearance.

- ADP levels aren't clearances, they're designators for people who have access to DoD computer systems.

- Foreign Government Information (FGI) is not a clearance, it's a marking used to indicate information sources

- DISCO is not a clearance, it's an agency (or, rather, a branch of an agency - DSS)

- ISSA and CISSP are IT certifications, no idea what they're doing on such a list


- Some of these terms - Umbra, for example - are obsolete, and were never actual clearances anyway

- The S in SCI stands for Sensitive, not Special

As already stated, Need to Know is the key.


You got my vote.



posted on Oct, 13 2006 @ 11:14 PM
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SIOP-ESI

Single integrated operations plan, extremely sensitive information.


Details of nuclear war plans.



posted on Oct, 14 2006 @ 07:17 AM
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ooh!
thax TIM for info.....



posted on Oct, 16 2006 @ 10:41 AM
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Hey guys whats up, I just wanted to give my two cents about clearances as i know them. Yankee White is not a clearance but the program a member of the us military would enter to work directly for the President, Vice President, or the White House in general. The clearance you get depends on what your job is, the Navy guy who cooks GW's food doesnt get as high a clearance as the guy who carries the football or the guards at Camp David. I was Yankee white from 99-01 and worked for the White House Communications Agency (WHCA) and my clearance was TSCI cat 1 with the Cat 1 meaning that i was cleared to carry a loaded weapon around the president. The way you get this job, at least in the Marines anyway, is first you have to be an infantryman, then you you need dumb luck to get selected out of bootcamp (im sure theres a minimum GT and AFQT scores you have to have but i dont know what they are) Once you get selected you go to a board of Navy/Marine officers and they yey or ney you. If you get a Yey you take Phsyc test which are long and drawn out and ask the same questions about 20 times in 20 different ways. Once thats done they send you to security forces school in Chesapeke Va and you learn how to shoot pistol, shotguns and learn the finer points of guard duty, once you graduate that you go to Marine Barracks washington dc and stand guard around the barracks until your clearance comes through which usually takes 6 months depending on how backlogged the DIA is. Once you get your TSCI clearance you go infront of another board with the Leadership of both the Camp David Security Company or the WHCA security detachment and they decide to which unit you will go. When i was there the stellar marines went to camp david while WHCA got the rejects, Ironicly Camp David is crappy duty while WHCA allows you to travel the world and stay in fancy hotels. If anyone has any questions Fire away and I'll answer them if I can.



posted on Mar, 12 2007 @ 09:30 PM
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Originally posted by Pyros

Originally posted by mrpinkbullets
Is there any such thing as a "Level" clearance or access? In The Bourne Supremacy, one high-ranking CIA employee asks the DCI (I think) for a "Level 5" access, or something like that. Is there any such thing as access or clearance levels denoted by numbers, and if so, what do they represent?


I have seen this once before. It had to do with classified USAF programs associated with stealth technology. I was once associated with a program that had a requirement to interact with a USAF VLO asset. Access to the data collected (which revealed technical aspects and RCS data of the target) was classified "Level IV". Some other programs were classified "Level II". I did not have access to these programs, therefore I do not fully understand the security mechanisms. I don't know if these terms were associated only with specific USAF programs, with stealth in general, or with a large group of programs. I only know that they existed....

Pyros


Yes, that's a military thing.



posted on Mar, 12 2007 @ 09:33 PM
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Originally posted by drunk
This seems like a dangerous topic discussing Security Clearances in public, dont you think?


I agree



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