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The Effect of the Sun on the Environment

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posted on Jan, 30 2007 @ 01:01 PM
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www.tmgnow.com...
I am curious what people think of this article. The methodology seems sound. I am throwing it out here because I want to see what other research people have culled.

Specifically, I am looking to find the scientific validity of the "hockey stick" graph, to wit, is there a stronger mathematical correlation between carbon dioxide and temperature than between solar activity and temperature?




posted on Feb, 5 2007 @ 11:31 PM
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You could peruse over this and note there was a later rebuttal of the Friis-Christensen and Lassen hypothesis by Laut.


The lure of solar forcing RealClimate

Sometimes even papers in highly respected journals fall into the same trap. Friis-Christensen and Lassen (Science, 1991) was a notorious paper that purported to link solar-cycle length (i.e. the time between sucessive sunspot maxima or minima) to surface temperatures that is still quoted widely. As discussed at length by Peter Laut and colleagues, the excellent correlation between solar cycle length and hemispheric mean temperature only appeared when the method of smoothing changed as one went along. The only reason for doing that is that it shows the relationship (that they 'knew' must be there) more clearly. And, unsurprisingly, with another cycle of data, the relationship failed to hold up.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Solar activity and terrestrial climate: an analysis of some purported correlations
Stanford -Peter Laut (pdf)

Background info: Solar variation Wiki



posted on Feb, 6 2007 @ 12:06 PM
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The article was very compelling. I now ask if people have information other than that from those authors that makes similar measurements of an alleged effect?

Also, is there any analysis done on the possibility of the CO2/sun/temperature measure being a coupled system? Perhaps the effect is more complicated than we think?



posted on Feb, 6 2007 @ 12:52 PM
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The radiation from the sun certainly could be a component to the warming trend. With the earth losing 10-15 percent of its magnetic field in the last 100 years and such, it's quite possible that the sun is a contributing factor.

What interests me is, what is causing the earth to lose its electromagnetic field?



posted on Feb, 6 2007 @ 12:52 PM
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I don't see how you can say that the article is compelling if, as Regenmacher pointed out, others have shown that the data was basically manipulated. Or did you mean Regenmacher's article was compelling?

[edit on 6-2-2007 by Nygdan]



posted on Feb, 6 2007 @ 01:54 PM
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One thing I have noticed that many want to blame or point to a single factor and that is rather ridiculous sense of logic in a complex system such as the climate. If the climate was so simplistic, it wouldn't take the world's largest computers years to model a single weather event.



posted on Feb, 8 2007 @ 10:34 AM
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Originally posted by Nygdan
I don't see how you can say that the article is compelling if, as Regenmacher pointed out, others have shown that the data was basically manipulated. Or did you mean Regenmacher's article was compelling?

[edit on 6-2-2007 by Nygdan]
The latter article.




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