It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

What can we do to address race-relations and solve racism?

page: 75
2
<< 72  73  74   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 23 2007 @ 10:52 AM
link   


posted by ceci2006

Here is an article I had read in response to Paula Zahn's special about Race in America last Tuesday. I'll post a couple of excerpts that are quite useful for everyone to read. This article is by Glenda Overstreet . .



American racism is not only endemic, it is indelible!

Is “it” getting better? Yes. Based on my observations, how long before "it" becomes a memory? At the current rate of progress, about 200 years. 10 generations.

Can it - racial respect - be hastened? Absolutely. But that requires leadership, especially from the White House. The Bully Pulpit. America may not end there, but it surely begins there. Republicans must give up playing the race card in every close election. Harold Ford, in Tennessee. The Playboy ad was “conjured” by the RNC. The ad ran 5 times in Tennessee, but was replayed gratis to an audience of millions across America on the evening news. The RNC got $10 million worth of air time for a lousy $500,000.

Why do they do that?

Can you just imagine the despicable, the derogatory conversation that the persons who thought up the ad in the first place must have had? Then those who planned the ad. And those who approved the ad and those who funded the ad? I’d like to know what they were saying, what they were thinking. It would be revealing, and explain a lot about the persistence of racism in America. Those were educated people. Talented people. Rich people. America's so-called "Best and Brightest?" I am fully satisfied the Republican Party regards “racism” as one of its primary assets. Say hello George Allen.


[edit on 1/23/2007 by donwhite]




posted on Jan, 24 2007 @ 03:06 AM
link   
First of all, I would like to thank all the well wishes and welcome I received during the last few days. It warms my heart that I am back among my ATS family again. And, I am very grateful to be back.


Now...on to the nitty gritty:


quoted by donwhite

Can it - racial respect - be hastened? Absolutely. But that requires leadership, especially from the White House. The Bully Pulpit. America may not end there, but it surely begins there. Republicans must give up playing the race card in every close election. Harold Ford, in Tennessee. The Playboy ad was “conjured” by the RNC. The ad ran 5 times in Tennessee, but was replayed gratis to an audience of millions across America on the evening news. The RNC got $10 million worth of air time for a lousy $500,000.


Don,

Your post pointed out a lot of important things that need to be stressed in this discourse about race relations. I believe that racial respect can be introduced into the national landscape by people who are thoughtfully concerned about understanding and kindness. However, I have discovered that it takes people who care and respect others to carry the conversation along.

Racial respect is still something that is hard to come by in our national leaders. As long as they continue to present examples of intolerance through their words and behavior, the constituents who follow them will not have the proper respect of others. Unfortunately, I tend to believe that 9/11 opened the floodgates regarding this lack of respect due to fear, the lack of curiosity and the inability to understand others different than themselves.

The sad thing is that tactics such as what happened during the Ford race in Tennessee happened because there are groups of people who still are willing to believe the propaganda of prejudice.

And I'm afraid (especially with the thread "Obama is Antichrist") that Barack Obama is going to be a victim of not only the RNC, but others who easily buy into the garbage built up from the days of Lee Atwater. Mr. Obama served in the state legislature and other official capacities before he became a Senator. He uses his intellect and conscience when working with others in Congress. And, because he has gained popularity in America, there are a few that are willing to discount his endeavors for the sake of those who are most willing to spread the most incredulous words regarding his personality as well as his middle name.



Can you just imagine the despicable, the derogatory conversation that the persons who thought up the ad in the first place must have had? Then those who planned the ad. And those who approved the ad and those who funded the ad? I’d like to know what they were saying, what they were thinking. It would be revealing, and explain a lot about the persistence of racism in America.


You and I both. Many times, I have had that same discussion with my family members about what might be going through the minds of those who planned this. And the more we discussed it, the sadder we got.

But, yes, I believe you when you say it would be revealing and would explain a lot about the persistence of racism. Not to mention, heart-breaking. It is of the highest hopes that if people were educated that they would be less hostile to others who are different than them.

However, in my discussions with others like myself in the real world, it sad to note that sometimes educated people can be just as prejudiced. You would think that education would help people to understand others, but that depends how such knowledge was disseminated to the particular person who held such biases in the first place.

President Woodrow Wilson is a telling example of this, especially with his policies against African-Americans during the time the film, Birth of a Nation (1917) was made:


Wilson - A Portrait
Woodrow Wilson's record on race relations was not very good. African Americans welcomed his election in 1912, but they were worried too. During his first term in office, the House passed a law making racial intermarriage a felony in the District of Columbia. His new Postmaster General also ordered that his Washington offices be segregated, with the Treasury and Navy soon doing the same. Suddenly, photographs were required of all applicants for federal jobs. When pressed by black leaders, Wilson replied, "The purpose of these measures was to reduce the friction � It is as far as possible from being a movement against the Negroes. I sincerely believe it to be in their interest."


[...]
When Wilson allowed his cabinet members to segregate government offices, [William Monroe] Trotter led the delegation from the National Independent Political League to meet with the president and protest this discriminatory policy. Wilson's explanation, that "segregation was caused by friction between the colored and white clerks, and not done to injure or humiliate the colored clerks, but to avoid friction," infuriated Trotter. After the shouting match that followed, Trotter was ordered out of the White House. Trotter then did what Wilson considered unforgivable. Standing on the White House grounds, he held a press conference and detailed what had just happened. A Wilson supporter in 1912, Du Bois now sided with Trotter. In [W.E.B.]Du Bois' view, Wilson "was by birth . . . unfitted for largesse of view or depth of feeling about racial injustice."
[...]
In 1919, as the peace talks in Paris began, Du Bois reached Europe as part of the American press delegation. But Trotter, denied a passport by Wilson's State Department, had to obtain a job on a trans-Atlantic steamer as a cook in order to get there. He appeared at the conference as a delegate from two groups pressing for more racial justice in the postwar world. Du Bois quietly pressured the French to mount a three-day Pan African Conference, with its findings presented to the president's inner circle. He also met with Wilson's advisor Colonel House on the matter, but, predictably, nothing came of it.


In talking about education being a focal point in terms of prejudice, President Wilson's book, History of the American People was frequently quoted in Birth of a Nation. To me, it means that sometimes "reason" can be misappropriated at the detriment of another group of people as author Ian Whitney writes:


Introduction: Birth of a Symposium
President Woodrow Wilson’s rave review for Birth Of A Nation never made much sense to me. First, how would one write with lightning? My guess is that it would be trickier to control than a fountain pen. Second, who would consider Birth Of A Nation to be a reflection of history?

Yet, people did just that. Beyond the second-wave KKK that it helped spawn, the film locked images in the audience’s mind that soon came to stand for a kind of truth — truth, incidentally, that was bolstered by the film’s frequent quoting of Woodrow Wilson’s book History of the American People. Perhaps Wilson’s lightning quip was more marketing than review.


What is frustrating is the fact that educated people can still hold the same animus and use "reason" to hide behind their own prejudices. That means something more must be done to get to the point of racial respect.

So, you are right in your words. Racial respect can be started by honestly discussing the issues with people who are intelligently thoughtful and willing to work on change without being fearful of others. They must use their knowledge to separate the wheat from the chaff. They must also have the conscience to reach out of their surroundings in order to get past the propaganda issued by those who don't care and are unwilling to fill in the gap caused by misunderstanding and intolerance.




[edit on 24-1-2007 by ceci2006]



posted on Jan, 24 2007 @ 10:12 AM
link   


posted by ceci2006



quoted by donwhite
Can it - racial respect - be hastened? Absolutely.


Don,
Racial respect is still something that is hard to come by in our national leaders. As long as they continue to present examples of intolerance through their words and behavior, the constituents who follow them will not have the proper respect of others. [The Nine Eleven Event] opened the floodgates regarding lack of respect due to fear . . [Edited by Don W]



I acknowledge that I first heard Rev. Al Sharpton use the term, “racial respect.” You may note I have stopped using “9/11" and instead use “Nine Eleven Event” in an effort to re-capture this tragedy back away from the Bush43 fear mongers. It was very encouraging when the public rejected Bush43's new hot button hate code word, “Islamofascist” as being descriptive of who he brands as “terrorists.”

Until we all can get our heads around my oft repeated phrase, “one man’s terrorist is another man’s hero” and all that implies, we remain vulnerable to unprincipled demagogues that will stoop as low as it takes to gain a moment’s popularity. Say Hello Bush43.



President Woodrow Wilson is a telling example of this, especially with his policies against African-Americans during the time the film, Birth of a Nation (1917) was made . . “



Woodrow Wilson. A tragic figure. Acclaimed educator. President of Princeton University, one of America’s leading institutions of higher learning, then governor of New Jersey. He went on to be president of the United States, yet when he hosted that film at the White House, he gave it widely reported praise. Yes, I have seen “Birth of a Nation” 2 times. First when I was still a racist, always benign to be sure, but just as cruel to those I helped to oppress. It's outcomes that count. Much more than inputs, sometimes. Then a few years ago I saw it again, after I had passed through my own racial epiphany. This time I saw the film for what it was - rank propaganda for white supremacists. George Wallace. (He did reform.) Ross Barnett. Orville Faubus. (They did not.) Theodore Bilbo. Strom Thurmond. Jesse Helms. All candidates for America’s to-come Hall of Infamy.


[edit on 1/24/2007 by donwhite]



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 01:03 AM
link   

Originally quoted by donwhite
I acknowledge that I first heard Rev. Al Sharpton use the term, “racial respect.”


Rev. Sharpton's phrase "racial respect" is also quite new to me as well. However, I think I remember him saying it in several capacities other than the Paula Zahn Show.

Speaking of Ms. Zahn, I used to have a low opinion of her in the past. But, I have gained new respect for her courage in presenting a series of shows on race relations. In her interviews, she presented rather hard questions from both sides. I might say that she has at least opened the door so that some can start the national discussion of race especially about immigration and the policies of what occurred on Sept. 11, 2001.

Her show that night was rather eye-opening to say the least. It also gives one the view that one must talk about race-relations because some of the old issues afforded to the subject matter still will not die.


You may note I have stopped using “9/11" and instead use “Nine Eleven Event” in an effort to re-capture this tragedy back away from the Bush43 fear mongers. It was very encouraging when the public rejected Bush43's new hot button hate code word, “Islamofascist” as being descriptive of who he brands as “terrorists.”


I have noted it. I think that your decision not to give "9/11" power is a very important step. Your words caused me to think about the detriment such a phrase has put on the American populace. "9/11" signifies to some a rallying cry toward nationalism and that is the most troubling to me. Furthermore, you are correct that it is coded in fear. As a result, when Americans think and use the word, it continues to present the ideology presented by the neo-con think tank that we should be apphrehensive and hostile to anyone who is "different". Also, it gives a person a free license to stigmaticize and slander anyone who is perceived a threat to them.

That is how I find "9/11" to be problematic. Btw, I also detest the term "Islamo-facist" as well. In Islam, there is no such thing. And it gives me the clue that when Mr. Bush said it, he disrespected the Islamic faith outright. I wonder how he would feel if someone had called his belief system "Born Again Fascism"?

That is what I mean that we need national leaders who are respectful of other cultures in their attempt to employ foreign and domestic policy.


Until we all can get our heads around my oft repeated phrase, “one man’s terrorist is another man’s hero” and all that implies, we remain vulnerable to unprincipled demagogues that will stoop as low as it takes to gain a moment’s popularity. Say Hello Bush43.


I definitely agree. I think that some Americans are very vunerable to the rhetoric proposed by politicians on this accord. My beef especially came when one Republican Congressman wrote a letter to his constituents about the "Muslims taking over Congress". That is the problematic rhetoric that continues to breed contempt for diversity and understanding in a multi-cultural population.


Woodrow Wilson. A tragic figure. Acclaimed educator. President of Princeton University, one of America’s leading institutions of higher learning, then governor of New Jersey. He went on to be president of the United States, yet when he hosted that film at the White House, he gave it widely reported praise.


That's what I meant in the last thread. When you mentioned the case of Harold Ford, immediately Wilson's comments about Birth of a Nation came to mind. It had showed me that even persons in high places are a victim of their own prejudices and beliefs. And when they are prejudiced, their decisions make the rest of us suffer. And President Wilson's prejudices caused a lot of havoc in the lives of people of color during that era.

It makes me wonder whether these times are much different.



Yes, I have seen “Birth of a Nation” 2 times. First when I was still a racist, always benign to be sure, but just as cruel to those I helped to oppress. It's outcomes that count. Much more than inputs, sometimes. Then a few years ago I saw it again, after I had passed through my own racial epiphany. This time I saw the film for what it was - rank propaganda for white supremacists.


The first time I saw "Birth of a Nation", it was rather hard to watch because there was someone's animus right before my eyes. Intellectually, you are taught to separate that fact and focus on the feat of D.W. Griffith's work. However, that is one film that you cannot focus on Griffith's direction without thinking what must have gone through his mind to create such damage to race-relations in America by the use of images and words (in the intertitles of the silent film). The impact of what his film has done is felt throughout the entire history of civil rights and diversity in America. I wondered then, as I do now, did he ever have a conscience?


George Wallace. (He did reform.) Ross Barnett. Orville Faubus. (They did not.) Theodore Bilbo. Strom Thurmond. Jesse Helms. All candidates for America’s to-come Hall of Infamy.


As well as Mitt Romney, George Allen, Trent Lott, Katherine Harris and Tom Tancredo. They deserve to be there too...as well as some others. They all remind me of the "Know Nothing" party in the 19th Century.

[edit on 25-1-2007 by ceci2006]



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 07:51 AM
link   
DOUBLE POST

Can it - racial respect - be hastened? Absolutely. But that requires leadership, especially from the White House. The Bully Pulpit. America may not end there, but it surely begins there. Republicans must give up playing the race card in every close election. Harold Ford, in Tennessee. The Playboy ad was “conjured” by the RNC. The ad ran 5 times in Tennessee, but was replayed gratis to an audience of millions across America on the evening news. The RNC got $10 million worth of air time for a lousy $500,000.


posted by ceci2006



Speaking of Ms. Zahn, I used to have a low opinion of her in the past. But, I have gained new respect for her courage in presenting a series of shows on race relations. In her interviews, she presented rather hard questions from both sides. I might say that she has at least opened the door so that some can start the national discussion of race especially about immigration and the policies of what occurred on Sept. 11, 2001.



[edit on 1/25/2007 by donwhite]



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 01:19 PM
link   
I haven't read this thread in a while (welcome back ceci
) but after seeing this article, I immediately thought of this thread.




Biden: 'I mean, you got the first mainstream African-American who is articulate and bright and clean and a nice-looking guy'...




What a colossally stupid thing to say.

:shk:


[edit on 31-1-2007 by loam]



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 03:44 PM
link   

Originally posted by loam
What a colossally stupid thing to say.


Is it the word clean that has everyone's panties in such a bunch?



Biden Calls Obama To Clarify

Joe Biden called Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) to clarify his "clean" comment to the New York Observer, Biden told reporters in a conference call this afternoon. Biden said Obama told him: "You don't have to explain anything to me. I know exactly what you meant." Asked to clarify his comments, where he said Obama was "articulate and bright and clean," Biden said he "really" regretted the word "clean" was taken out of context. Biden: "My mother has an expression clean as a whistle sharp as a tack, that was the context." As to the effect it might have on the African-American vote, Biden: "I have no doubt that Jesse Jackson and other black leaders ... knew exactly what I meant. We have a very, very long relationship. ... There will be no misunderstanding."
Source


I'm not at all sure what everyone's so jacked up about. But I guess people take offense to strange things.

[edit on 31-1-2007 by Benevolent Heretic]



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 06:17 PM
link   

Originally posted by Benevolent Heretic

Originally posted by loam
What a colossally stupid thing to say.


Is it the word clean that has everyone's panties in such a bunch?



Huh?


Of course not.

It's, by way of implication, that Obama is "first" because that vast majority of others are not.



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 10:50 PM
link   
I saw your post and thought you'd like these racism posts I did, and maybe you would get some ideas from them.


These are some I created. Have fun, be sure to post your thoughts.

Racism

Another Racism Post

Still Another Racism Post



[edit on 1-2-2007 by SpartanKingLeonidas]



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 11:37 PM
link   
Hi, loam and thank you for the kind words. I am glad that you are continuing the conversation.


I will chime in a little later because there's a lot on my plate in terms of discussion.


But thanks for bringing up the Barack Obama issue.

And I also thank SKL for his contribution to the thread.



posted on Feb, 2 2007 @ 07:00 AM
link   
I still don't know what to make about Mr. Biden's comments on Barack Obama except to say that he should have been more careful in his selection of words. Similar to what has been said in other threads concerning race recently, I think that when a person uses vernacular that might be interpreted differently by various groups of people, it is best to err on the respectful side.

He should have known better. However, politicians have been making a rash of unwarranted remarks in the news without any consideration to whom they are addressing.

One example still comes to mind is about the Virginia politician who told Black people to "get over slavery". Knowing that the man is seventy-eight and probably stuck in Segregation, I wouldn't be surprised by his remarks.

For Mr. Biden, who is in rareified air because of his proximity to the White House, it is probably that audience he is speaking to--instead of the multicultural landscape of the American people. And when politicians forget about that cultural aspect of the United States, watch out and be prepared.



new topics

top topics



 
2
<< 72  73  74   >>

log in

join