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The Third Electrical Current

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posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 06:50 PM
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I don't care what other think of me. There is no new current just a clever application and I hope to made it clear enough here why. If the world thinks different..fine for them. Then get happy with SDC.


Then draw us a circuit with both AC and DC current flow without switching polarity.

I have thought long and hard, and you just can't do it any way other than using the SullyDC system.

[edit on 15-6-2006 by Malichai]




posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 06:53 PM
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Originally posted by Malichai
Before Sully DC you could not do these things with either AC or DC.



byway, how is about that:



________________________
| |
____ |
| AC | |
| ~ | |
------ coil |
+ |_________#######______|
|
____
| DC | electrolyt
| - |
------
- |__________######_______
| coil |
____ |
| AC | |
| ~ | |
------ |
|_________________________



not even a switch required.



posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 07:07 PM
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not even a switch required.


I'm sorry, that made no sense to me.

I would hate to ask you to draw a diagram, scan it, and upload to photobucket.com, so I won't do that.

Could you describe the circuit path?



posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 07:18 PM
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hmm ok ..
It's late here..

In short:
This are 3 power supply. The middle a DC one the top and the one below AC.
The two AC supply drive each one of the coil and the DC the electrolyt.

It's not really required but if you want the same behaviour as in your sdc circuit you set the AC supply that they work with the same frequence and in phase.

if this doesnt help I can do a drawing tomorrow.

bed time for me..

Just because I read a hugh-thread on atc and I like the idea, let me contribute to better tunes:

* hugh * you all!



posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 07:24 PM
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This are 3 power supply. The middle a DC one the top and the one below AC.
The two AC supply drive each one of the coil and the DC the electrolyt.

It's not really required but if you want the same behaviour as in your sdc circuit you set the AC supply that they work with the same frequence and in phase.


It sounds like you are describing two circuits, not one.

How does the DC connect to the AC without polarity switching somewhere?



posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 08:53 PM
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Originally posted by Malichai

Then draw us a circuit with both AC and DC current flow without switching polarity.

I have thought long and hard, and you just can't do it any way other than using the SullyDC system.

[edit on 15-6-2006 by Malichai]


How about this one ??




www.interq.or.jp...

Also read...

www.interq.or.jp...

It's no more than a DC inverter...



[edit on 15-6-2006 by Jedi_Master]



posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 08:58 PM
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The invention may thus be characterized as a method and apparatus of generating multi-directional currents in a medium by reversing the direction of electron flow in at least one of a pair of electrodes. If the voltages applied to the electrodes are DC voltages, then the multi-directional currents have characteristics of DC currents, and if the voltages applied to the electrodes are two or three phase AC voltages, then the multi-directional currents have characteristics of AC currents. However, unlike conventional DC and AC currents, the currents generated by the method and apparatus of the invention move or rotate. If the electrodes are one-dimensional wires, then the currents rotate in two-directions. If the electrodes themselves move, or extend over two or three-dimensions, for example a plane or a curved plane, then the currents will move in three-dimension


Continued with Images, and applications...

www.rexresearch.com...


I have not looked at them all yet, but it would seem there could be many uses for this. Old problems will be solved.



posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 09:19 PM
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It's no more than a DC inverter...


An inverter is an open circuit unless you connect it to something.

Then you only have DC on the working end.

The inverter itself does no work.

It only converts from one current type to another.

[edit on 15-6-2006 by Malichai]



posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 09:36 PM
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Originally posted by Malichai

An inverter is an open circuit unless you connect it to something.


Ummm...well yes it is but so is the Sully current


Then you only have DC on the working end.


No...you have an Alternating DC ( in the square wave inverter, if a pure Sine wave inverter you basically have a AC sine wave/signal )


The inverter itself does no work.


Don't know where you're going with this, explain please...


It only converts from one current type to another.


Exactly ( but in the Square wave it's still pretty much DC ) that's what the Sully does too correct ???



[edit on 15-6-2006 by Jedi_Master]



posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 09:51 PM
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No...you have an Alternating DC ( in the square wave inverter, if a pure Sine wave inverter you basically have a AC sine wave/signal )



Current does not change direction in the working end.



posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 10:04 PM
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OK...tell ya what...

Since you are in touch with the inventor, perhaps you can give us the components that he used in making this circuit...

The electrodes used...what is used to switch between poles ( don't tell me it's a SPDT toggle switch )...

And perhaps you can ask him do do a video of the process with an O'scope on the input and on the output, and the volt meter and the Amp meters connected ( I've seen the video you posted and all I see is electrolysis happening )...

Because I for one think it's nothing new, and this guy is a fraud...

[edit on 15-6-2006 by Jedi_Master]



posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 10:09 PM
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Originally posted by Jedi_Master
OK...tell ya what...

Since you are in touch with the inventor, perhaps you can give us the components that he used in making this circuit...


www.rexresearch.com...

Images of different applications here.

He said he would give me diagrams of some newer applications when he could, and I'll post them here as soon as I get them.



posted on Jun, 15 2006 @ 10:17 PM
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Hey...you know I've already read that what I need is the actual components used you know what is the part # of the switch, the part # of the electrode ( or if it is home made how did he do it, and what he used )...

This way I can look up what he used, because I think he used some NOT gates to achieve this...



posted on Jun, 16 2006 @ 05:17 AM
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here is the circuit I scratched:


actually 2. A is the first variant I posted in a fast draft.
B an alternative.

In circuit A the AC generator G2 till G5 are all working synchron, same amplitude, frequence and phase (can easly be done if you use a transformator with 4 coils out)

In circuit B:
All DC generators (G1,G2 and G4) deliver the same voltage. Make sure they are isolated ffom each other..no common ground!
The AC generator or powers supply V3 and V5 are also meant to have the same output thought this here not that important


The left side is for a single coil, the right if you use multiple coils. (cascading)
(wasn't sure about your drawing if you painted 3 to show the principle or if you really meant to have more than 1 coil.)

The circuit has only one little deficit to yours and this is that the voltage in the electrolyt is less in the coil middle than it's end due to the ohm resistant in the coil. (doing superposition you will see that the coil is DC powerd from both end due the power supply shortcut and thats the reason why I also painted the cascading)
So you should not build the coil with a big resistant.
coil resistant < electrolyt resistant.

i checked wether it would make a difference when we turn the connection of the lower coil (and the G3 direction) . I don't think it makes one. (both end driven->supperposition again)

for analysing the circuit you best use the supperposition methode.
-> voltage power sources are shortcuts in the view of the others.
and for the electrolyt and the coil an equivalent resistance network.

when i didnt made a mistake the circuit A and B that I showed have the same behaviour (coils driven with AC, electrlyt driven with DC) like yours with exception of that mentioned deficit but with no switches on the benefit side.



posted on Jun, 16 2006 @ 08:01 AM
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here is the circuit I scratched:


Electrode polarity will switch in every case you presented.

It does NOT do the same thing as Sully DC.



posted on Jun, 16 2006 @ 08:11 AM
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Originally posted by Malichai

here is the circuit I scratched:


Electrode polarity will switch in every case you presented.

It does NOT do the same thing as Sully DC.


no it won't if the DC's voltage offsets the AC's so that you reach zero (get close at least) but never fall below it.



posted on Jun, 16 2006 @ 08:46 AM
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no it won't if the DC's voltage offsets the AC's so that you reach zero (get close at least) but never fall below it.


Current direction, and polarity are not the same thing.

Either electrode polarity will change, or current direction will not change in each case.

[edit on 16-6-2006 by Malichai]



posted on Jun, 16 2006 @ 09:03 AM
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Originally posted by Malichai


no it won't if the DC's voltage offsets the AC's so that you reach zero (get close at least) but never fall below it.


Current direction, and polarity are not the same thing.

Either electrode polarity will change, or current direction will not change in each case.



i know i know, just look at pic B and imagine the AC wasn't there.. nothing happens, then with the AC, during the first half of the period, you get 'excess voltage' on one side, resulting in a current, then the other way. If your AC source's peak voltage is lower than or equal to (bit tricky) the DC's, then you will never experience a reversion of polarity.

Yes or No ?



posted on Jun, 16 2006 @ 10:16 AM
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i know i know, just look at pic B and imagine the AC wasn't there.. nothing happens, then with the AC, during the first half of the period, you get 'excess voltage' on one side, resulting in a current, then the other way. If your AC source's peak voltage is lower than or equal to (bit tricky) the DC's, then you will never experience a reversion of polarity.


You will either see a reversal of electrode polarity, or no change in current direction.

One, or the other.

None of the circuits do what Sully DC does.



posted on Jun, 16 2006 @ 10:22 AM
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Originally posted by Malichai

here is the circuit I scratched:


Electrode polarity will switch in every case you presented.

It does NOT do the same thing as Sully DC.


Coils are driven AC, Electrolyt sees DC all the time. Same as in your SDC circuit. It does the same thing, with exception of the deficit i mentioned, caused by the current that flows a little different. In coil: superposition of the DC current flowing in on both side of the coil and out through the electrolyt, overlayed with the AC part. The coil forces through the DC current equals out. The AC one is the one left and the one you like to have in the coi. (and it is only in the coil!).

That's what I try to tell you all the time. In your circuit, the coils are driven AC, the polarity in your coils (voltage) as well as the current direction change! If you don't see this than you don't understand your own circuit.
A coil is a coil and behaves as a coil. If you have AC current in your coil you also have AC voltage wit ha phase shift byway but let forget about this for once:

What you should do is to draw a equivalent resistance network. Then you see it.
ok, I see will have to do this for you, so you see.

and about the DC and AC generators in my circuit. The AC amplitude should be less than the DC value that you dont get mixed gas. But this is only for the gas generation importand. The circuit behaviour is independent of the DC - AC amplitude relation.



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