It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Third Electrical Current

page: 2
0
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 07:50 PM
link   

Originally posted by Aelita

...And it doesn't do jack except for good old electrolysis...


It also vibrates the electrode.

Something you cannot do with DC, but you can't use AC current in this application.


The system allows AC effects where only DC current can be used.




posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 08:13 PM
link   

It is a new and unique idea, but its applications will not be the typical electrical circuits you are thinking of.


It's not new or unique, and it is typical...


It also vibrates the electrode.

Something you cannot do with DC, but you can't use AC current in this application.




Basically what this guy is doing is creating an AC frequency with a DC power source ( a DC inverter ), splitting that frequency, and rectifying part of it for the DC voltage, and letting the other half out to "vibrate" the electrode...

Where he is rectifing and splitting it is probably in the electrode...




[edit on 13-6-2006 by Jedi_Master]



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 08:25 PM
link   

Originally posted by Jedi_Master

It is a new and unique idea, but its applications will not be the typical electrical circuits you are thinking of.


It's not new or unique, and it is typical...


It is new and unique which is why it received a patent.


Basically what this guy is doing is creating an AC frequency with a DC power source ( a DC inverter ), splitting that frequency, and rectifying part of it for the DC voltage, and letting the other half out to "vibrate" the electrode...

Where he is rectifing and splitting it is probably in the electrode...


There are no rectifiers, or inverters.

There is no frequency splitting.

You are trying to apply this to a typical circuit which is why you are not understanding.

Try reading the patent linked in the original article.



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 08:50 PM
link   
OK...

I was concentrating on the circuit, I missed the patent...

After reading the patent I changed my mind, no rectification...but it doesn't say at what frequency it is being switched so therefore I'm forced to say it is still an AC current but at a very high frequency...

Now it says that at least one of the electrodes has a coil correct ??

Now a coil is an inductor, and the electrodes in the electrolyte also creates a capacitor, and with the resistance of the electrolyte, what does that create???

Answer: a Tank circuit

As you know ( at least I hope you know ) a standard VOM set on DC will pick UHF and VHF frequencies as a steady DC voltage ( it switches too fast for the meter to pick up )...

So again, this is still nothing new or unique...

Unless the guy can reveal the frequency at which he is switching...



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 09:26 PM
link   

After reading the patent I changed my mind, no rectification...but it doesn't say at what frequency it is being switched so therefore I'm forced to say it is still an AC current but at a very high frequency...


It cannot be an AC circuit because current only goes one way, and electrode polarity never changes.

It has properties of both AC and DC.

Applications will likely lie where DC current must be used, but AC EM effects are required.

Applications, beyond electrolysis, yet to be discovered....



Answer: a Tank circuit


In a tank circuit you have one wire each connected to the positive, and negative electrodes of your battery/DC power supply.

In the SullyDC circuit you have two wires connected to each 180 degree switched negative and positive electrodes of the battery/DC power supply.

I think seeing the electrode design would help, but I can't seem to view the patent images.

[edit on 13-6-2006 by Malichai]



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 09:46 PM
link   

In a tank circuit you have one wire each connected to the positive, and negative electrodes of your battery/DC power supply.


A Tank only works with AC won't work with DC...

Since you have a BEE ( or what ever ), and since I'm only a lowly Associates holder ( but with a lot of experience ), perhaps You can explain what is going on, because all I see is a simple DC inverter, at a high frequency...



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 09:50 PM
link   
Unti we get more data, it appears as though all they've done is used a DC current to create a block waveform...

in that case, theyve invented digital transmissions!!!!

What will be next... maybe they'll invent logic gates and processors!

lol.



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 10:09 PM
link   

Originally posted by johnsky
What will be next... maybe they'll invent logic gates and processors!

lol.




Maybe Quad D Flipflops, and Monostable Multivibrators as well...




posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 10:12 PM
link   

Originally posted by Jedi_Master

A Tank only works with AC won't work with DC...

Since you have a BEE ( or what ever ), and since I'm only a lowly Associates holder ( but with a lot of experience ), perhaps You can explain what is going on, because all I see is a simple DC inverter, at a high frequency...


Would you believe this is from the first google link for Tank Circuit?


If an inductor and a capacitor are connected in parallel with each other, and then briefly energized by connection to a DC voltage source, oscillations will ensue as energy is exchanged from the capacitor to inductor and visa-versa. These oscillations may be viewed with an oscilloscope connected in parallel with the inductor/capacitor circuit. Parallel inductor/capacitor circuits are commonly known as tank circuits.

Inductor-capacitor "tank" circuit


I know, there is little purpose for this, yet there is such a thing as a DC tank circuit.

Since current flows only one way with SullyDC I assumed you were speaking of the mysterious DC Tank Circuit.



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 10:18 PM
link   

Unti we get more data, it appears as though all they've done is used a DC current to create a block waveform...


Quit thinking typical circuits, and look hard at the diagram.

Trace the path of the electrons.

The current never changes direction, so there is no square wave.

The Direction of the current through the electrodes is being switched, but not the polarity.

Negative to negative [and positive to positive] switching is creating AC effects by physically reversing the direction of the electron flow.

The system only works with two negative and two positive power connections.

[edit on 13-6-2006 by Malichai]



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 10:35 PM
link   

Originally posted by Malichai

Originally posted by Jedi_Master

A Tank only works with AC won't work with DC...

Since you have a BEE ( or what ever ), and since I'm only a lowly Associates holder ( but with a lot of experience ), perhaps You can explain what is going on, because all I see is a simple DC inverter, at a high frequency...


Would you believe this is from the first google link for Tank Circuit?


If an inductor and a capacitor are connected in parallel with each other, and then briefly energized by connection to a DC voltage source, oscillations will ensue as energy is exchanged from the capacitor to inductor and visa-versa. These oscillations may be viewed with an oscilloscope connected in parallel with the inductor/capacitor circuit. Parallel inductor/capacitor circuits are commonly known as tank circuits.

*edit to add*

Guess what you need to get to it to ossiliate again ??

Answer: switch polarity thus creating an AC signal...



Inductor-capacitor "tank" circuit


I know, there is little purpose for this, yet there is such a thing as a DC tank circuit.

Since current flows only one way with SullyDC I assumed you were speaking of the mysterious DC Tank Circuit.


Ohhh My I see you have been out of it for a while...

Let's examine what was said...



If an inductor and a capacitor are connected in parallel with each other, and then briefly energized by connection to a DC voltage source, oscillations will ensue as energy is exchanged from the capacitor to inductor and visa-versa. These oscillations may be viewed with an oscilloscope connected in parallel with the inductor/capacitor circuit. Parallel inductor/capacitor circuits are commonly known as tank circuits.


Notice what I bolded, the circuit has to be briefly energised not continuously, this guys circuit is switching from positive to negative at a freq. we don't know ( I guesss you don't see that )...



Guess what you need to do to get it to ossilate again...

Answer: switch polarity...






[edit on 13-6-2006 by Jedi_Master]



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 10:46 PM
link   

Ohhh My I see you have been out of it for a while...


This is not a Tank Circuit. It is a different system. Apples - Oranges

Back on topic....

It is DC in that electrons flow from one electrode to another.

Don't try to explain it with what you know of typical circuits.

To me it seems to serve little purpose other than applications where current flows through a fluid medium, and AC can't be used.


Like the Electrokinetic lifter.

[edit on 13-6-2006 by Malichai]



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 10:50 PM
link   

Originally posted by Malichai
Don't try to explain it with what you know of typical circuits.



Why not ???

What makes this circuit so special ???

Still looks like a DC inverter...

Or is there some super secret electrolyte involved ???

Is this guy some sort of super intelligent alien genius ???



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 10:56 PM
link   

What makes this circuit so special ???


It has two positive, and two negative power terminals, and circuit design will be different from typical AC and DC circuits.

There may be few applications, and it may die off.

Maybe the system does not deserve to be called The Third Electrical Current.

Or people far smarter than you or I will find applications that were not possible before.



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 11:07 PM
link   

Originally posted by Malichai

What makes this circuit so special ???


It has two positive, and two negative power terminals, and circuit design will be different from typical AC and DC circuits.


Yes it does but it is switched positive and negative, but is no different from no other circuit I've seen


There may be few applications, and it may die off.


I doubt if there are any applications other than electrolysis...



Maybe the system does not deserve to be called The Third Electrical Current.


No it does not, it's not a new application...



Or people far smarter than you or I will find applications that were not possible before.


I doubt it, most people I've talked to are still wandering how he got a patent for this idea, as it's... *shrugs*... nothing new...



This is not a Tank Circuit. It is a different system. Apples - Oranges


OT...sure 'bout that ???


[edit on 13-6-2006 by Jedi_Master]



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 11:36 PM
link   

Yes it does but it is switched positive and negative, but is no different from no other circuit I've seen


It is NOT switched negative to positive.

The negative electrode is always negative, and the positive electrode is always positive.

It is switched negative to negative, and positive to positive.



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 11:45 PM
link   
Regardless of what it is.......

What would the advantage be to have flux running through a DC line ???



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 11:47 PM
link   

Originally posted by Malichai

Yes it does but it is switched positive and negative, but is no different from no other circuit I've seen


It is NOT switched negative to positive.

The negative electrode is always negative, and the positive electrode is always positive.

It is switched negative to negative, and positive to positive.


How in the hell do you get that ???

According to the diag SW1 (+) is closed and SW2 (-) is as well, so current is flowing from SW1 to SW2 so how is it flowing from negative to negative, and positive to positive....

It can't happen...

Give it up you're wrong...



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 11:51 PM
link   

Originally posted by imbalanced
Regardless of what it is.......

What would the advantage be to have flux running through a DC line ???


The advantage would only be seen where DC current was required such as water electrolysis.

AC electro-magnetic effects can be produced without changing the polarity of the electrodes.

When I posted this I did not understand it, but now I think I see how it is unique.

There may seem to be no point to switching from negative back to negative, but since the two come from different directions the current reverses direction.

Instead of reversing polarity the physical direction of the current is switched within the electrode.



posted on Jun, 13 2006 @ 11:56 PM
link   

How in the hell do you get that ???

According to the diag SW1 (+) is closed and SW2 (-) is as well, so current is flowing from SW1 to SW2 so how is it flowing from negative to negative, and positive to positive....


The fluid medium is the completion of the circuit.

The wires do not cross.

It is not flowing from negative to negative. It is switched from negative to negative and the other side is switched from positive to positive.

The current flow within the electrode changes direction[but not polarity], but only flows one way across the fluid medium.

Two negatives and two positives required to connect to the power source.

[edit on 13-6-2006 by Malichai]



new topics

top topics



 
0
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join