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SCI/TECH: Scientists Say Alaska's Augustine Volcano Showing Signs Of Erupting

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posted on Dec, 15 2005 @ 10:11 AM
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Hundreds of miniature earthquakes along with a sulfurous steam plume and a new swath of ash on Alaska's Augustine Volcano have scientists looking for a possible eruption of the volcano within the next few months. Alaska's Volcano Observatory has been monitoring the uninhabited volcanic island more closely since bumping its status up to code yellow from green on Nov. 29. The volcano last erupted in 1986, when ash from a 7-mile-high column drifted over Anchorage and kept flights out of the skies over Cook Inlet.
 



www.adn.com
Augustine Volcano has rumbled with earthquakes, blasted steam and belched sulfurous fumes during the past few days.

People in Kachemak Bay communities reported "sewer" smells in the air, and the FAA restricted flights below 6,000 feet within five miles of the summit.

A gigantic plume stretched into the mouth of Cook Inlet. Ash dusted the snow. New vents emerged.

[…..]

"Augustine is doing all the things that Augustine does prior to an eruption," said volcanologist Game McGimsey on Tuesday. "Now, that doesn't mean that Augustine is going to erupt -- we're still at color code 'yellow.' But we're at a little higher level of concern than we were yesterday."



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.




Shown above the Augustine volcano is steaming from the summit and exhibiting other behaviors consistent with previous pre-eruption activities, including increased earthquakes, swelling, steaming and reports of strong sulfur smells were reported in Homer, Nanwalek and Port Graham Alaska.

The Augustine Volcano was mentioned briefly on the Discovery Channel when it aired the documentary on the Yellowstone Super Volcano, however I am not sure if it is in fact a super volcano, yet it was mentioned so I assume there may be a possibility is might be a super volcano.


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posted on Dec, 15 2005 @ 10:24 AM
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What's a super volcano?



posted on Dec, 15 2005 @ 10:35 AM
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Originally posted by Ghaleon4
What's a super volcano?


Super volcanos are believed to be the most destructive force on this planet. Few exist in the world so when they erupt they do so with a force tens of thousands of times greater than other eruptions.

In other words you do not want to be around one when they blow their top.



posted on Dec, 15 2005 @ 11:18 AM
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I wouldn't be all the surprised if it did erupt. I mean we have had a real active season all the way around the world. We've had earthquakes, destructive hurricanes, snow storms, and now we have a possible volcano eruption. Hopefully, that part of Alaksa is not inhabited by people.



posted on Dec, 15 2005 @ 01:47 PM
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Originally posted by Ghaleon4
What's a super volcano?



Source
A supervolcano refers to a volcano that produces the largest and most voluminous kinds of eruption on Earth. The actual explosivity of these eruptions varies, but the sheer volume of extruded magma is enough to radically alter the landscape and severely impact global climate for years, with a cataclysmic effect on life.


If this is anything like the Toba event, which covered the whole of the India subcontinent in a layer of ash 15cms thick...

It is not something you want to be around when it goes off and that was the largest we have on record and was 75,000 years ago. [Roughly]



posted on Dec, 15 2005 @ 01:52 PM
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not a supervolcano, doesn't have the magma chamber, supervolcanos generally are caldera's not don't have the distinctive mountain volcano look. I wouldn't expect anything over VEI 5 or 6 on this max. and thats on the high side. Expect a gray mostly gas and ash eruption, pyroclastic flows and Lahars but its unpopulated so the biggest risk will be to planes.



posted on Jan, 15 2006 @ 10:37 AM
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As predicted last month, St Augustine has erupted in fact it erupted 6 times in Just one Day. Fortunately all eruptions have been small and caused little if any damage at all.





Yahoo News


Picture Date: January 12, 2006 14:00:00
Image Creator: McGimsey, Game
Image courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey.

Six eruptions recorded on Friday and early Saturday from the 4,134-foot Augustine Volcano sent plumes of ash drifting across Cook Inlet into several Kenai Peninsula communities. A pilot reported seeing one plume about 10 miles in the air. The eruptions halted air travel and closed schools Friday.

"A very likely scenario is this kind of activity over the next several days or weeks," Coombs said.

Each of the latest eruptions has lasted just a few minutes, Coombs said. In comparison, Mount Spurr, 80 miles west of Anchorage, erupted three times in 1992 with each eruption lasting about four hours.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



For those intersted you can find a variety of very high quality images along with data on the recent activity Here


[edit on 1/15/2006 by shots]



posted on Jan, 15 2006 @ 10:41 AM
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Originally posted by shots
For those intersted you can find a variety of very high quality images along with data on the recent activity Here


Thanks for the link, Shots!

Excellent photos and overall details regarding this.

[edit username spelling]

[edit on 1/15/2006 by 12m8keall2c]



posted on Jan, 28 2006 @ 10:26 AM
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Reuters



After 10 days of relative calm, Alaska's Augustine Volcano roared back to life late on Friday, shooting a cloud of ash 40,000 feet into the sky.

It was the 10th explosion since January 11, when the 4,134-foot (1,260-meter) volcano in southern Cook Inlet began an eruptive phase, reported the Alaska Volcano Observatory, a joint federal-state office.

As of late Friday, there were no reports of ash settling onto any of the nearby communities, but some was expected to drift onto Kodiak Island, southeast of the peak, said Janet Schaefer, a geologist with the volcano observatory.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.

Well I guess this Classifies as a BIG Erruption, for the Cloud of ash has risen up to 40.000 up to the sky, which is Ten Times more then the Previous erruptions.



posted on Jan, 28 2006 @ 11:52 AM
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Originally posted by Souljah

Well I guess this Classifies as a BIG Erruption, for the Cloud of ash has risen up to 40.000 up to the sky, which is Ten Times more then the Previous erruptions.


This is not the largest there was a report by a pilot that stated he saw ash as high as 10 miles which is 52,800 feet. The link is above in my last update.



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