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Apollo lands on the moon...

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posted on Aug, 20 2005 @ 09:39 AM
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I just had to post these pics... Cos' doesn't it make your stomache turn when you see these videos... ladies and gentlemen... THE APOLLO 11...!!!

Apollo pics

Pics are on the page, just go down



[edit on 20-8-2005 by Figher Master FIN]




posted on Aug, 20 2005 @ 09:53 AM
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cool photos, i had never seen them before.



posted on Aug, 20 2005 @ 10:44 AM
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I was seven years old at the time and us kids sat on our parents bed in a darkened room watching it on a small black & white tv.

I knew people would be living on the Moon when I grew up, and the future looked so grand. But that still hasn't happened......

Could you please change your headline to something more descriptive of the subject



posted on Aug, 20 2005 @ 11:23 AM
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Originally posted by anxietydisorder
I was seven years old at the time and us kids sat on our parents bed in a darkened room watching it on a small black & white tv.

I knew people would be living on the Moon when I grew up, and the future looked so grand. But that still hasn't happened......

Could you please change your headline to something more descriptive of the subject


Cool, I changed it... I'd give nearly anything just to have had the oppertunity to live then...
Cos' there will never come an other chanse... The first planet is already taken, and there will never come a "new" first planet...



posted on Aug, 20 2005 @ 11:27 AM
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The only thing that makes my stomach turn is that this was simply the product of a cold war rivalry and once that was over, we as a people haven't done anything else to advance mankind's travels into space...we should have been to Mars a long time ago, but it seems we won't be there for at least a couple of decades now, if ever...



posted on Aug, 20 2005 @ 12:58 PM
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As a child I was unaware of the politics involved in the space program and it all seemed so magical and amazing.
For me it was a good age to watch it from because it was untainted by what was going on in the White House and the Kremlin.

Ahh, the innocence of youth.....

I fear my life will be over before I have the chance to see mankind walk on the planet Mars, which is a shame. We have the technology to mount a mission now if many nations joined together. (the cost would be too high for any one nation to undertake on its own)

I don't know how old you are Figher Master FIN, but I hope it's something you will get to see.

Thanks for the change, much better



posted on Aug, 20 2005 @ 01:10 PM
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This was an incredible achievement, in the name of ALL mankind. Americans may feel proud of this incredible undertaking. But be warned, nationalism does not lead us anywhere helpful.



posted on Aug, 20 2005 @ 01:11 PM
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We will go to Mars one day. Our future is bright, don't think the problems of today are going to burden us in the future. No matter where you live in the world, you should be proud of the time we live in and the future we are going to have.



posted on Aug, 20 2005 @ 01:14 PM
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I hear a one-way trip is possible for about 3 bil. But Im not sure the public would stand for such a fantastic suicide. Could you imagine the liftoff ceremony?


jra

posted on Aug, 20 2005 @ 01:34 PM
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More great pics here on this site (for all the Apollo missions) www.apolloarchive.com...



posted on Aug, 20 2005 @ 03:29 PM
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If you look at that last pic the shadow of the rock is .2mm different than the shadow of the "astronaut" clear proof that it never happened. Ohh and how is the flag waving?! Wires in the fabric?? Please. The logical conlcusion is this was a movie set with a stiff breeze.



posted on Aug, 20 2005 @ 04:00 PM
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the plag pole was like an upside down L which supported the flag. Its obvious from other photos.



posted on Aug, 20 2005 @ 04:08 PM
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Originally posted by mxboy15u
If you look at that last pic the shadow of the rock is .2mm different than the shadow of the "astronaut" clear proof that it never happened. Ohh and how is the flag waving?! Wires in the fabric?? Please. The logical conlcusion is this was a movie set with a stiff breeze.


I hope you are just trying to be funny. If not your misinformed or just trying to start something that has been beaten to death in other threads........



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 05:19 AM
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Great pics...I enjoyed the full Apollo 11 PDI footage.
It's the first time I've seen that full version.

Thanks for that...It brought back some great memories.



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 05:49 AM
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Great Pics i can not wait untill we go to the moon again . There would of been a great enjoyment at nasa when the Apollo landed



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 05:56 AM
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Why aren't there any visible stars...? (other than the sun)



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 09:57 AM
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Maybe the moon has an atmosphere like ours. We can't see our stars during the day.



posted on Aug, 23 2005 @ 10:13 AM
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Originally posted by Vinci
Why aren't there any visible stars...? (other than the sun)


The exposure of the photographs was not long enough to capture them. The film captured the very bright surface of the Moon and the bright objects (astronauts and the stuff they brought with them).

The Moon, during the day, is extremely bright: there are no clouds, no dust storms, etc to block the light of the Sun -- there is no atmosphere to scatter light either like we have here on Earth, plus the astronauts suits were white (this was to reflect as much of the Sun's light [heat] away from the suits). To take a picture of a bright object with a bright background, you need to set the exposure time to be fast, and close down the aperture setting too; that's like the pupil in your eye constricting to let less light in when you walk outside on a sunny day.

The pictures you take are set for bright objects, and the stars are faint objects -- in the fast exposure they simply do not have enough time to register on the film. If you were to go outside here on Earth on the darkest night imaginable and take a picture with the exact same camera settings the astronauts used, you won't see any stars.



posted on Aug, 24 2005 @ 04:02 PM
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Try to take a picture of a flashlight shining at you at night and you wont be able to see the stars in the film, even if it was a clear night.

A lot of these anti-moon consipracy theroists need to take some basic photography classes, as well as physics



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 07:55 PM
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AH that last picture. As an astronomer and a big space buff that one spooks me. To think of what it is; what the whole apollo program was give me butterflies. I am so jealous. To think of where thoes pictures are from my God the feeling is undescribrable!







 
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