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Evidence of human occupation in Mexico around the Last Glacial Maximum

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posted on Aug, 12 2020 @ 03:44 AM
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originally posted by: peter vlar

originally posted by: FishBait

originally posted by: rnaa
I'm always interested in evidence that pushes the human migration history back. But this report has a long way to go to catch the Australians - current estimate being 65,000 years - and based on a lot more than dubious flints.


The push now is to show they didn't just sit in Aus/East asia for 50k year before getting to the Americas across a magic land bridge that has always been a dubious theory.


There's nothing dubious at all about Beringea. Think less of a tiny land bridge and more the 620,000 square miles of land at its peak. Without that land bridge we wouldn't have Saber Toothed Cats in N. America has they first evolved in Europe before moving first to Africa, then Asia and finally N. America.

Conversely, animals that evolved in N. America and later went extinct here, like horses and camelids, would never have found their way to Asia had Beringea not existed. It was actually somewhat of a temperate climate and devoid of glaciation as little snow fell there.

There were also at least 5 KA of human occupation of Beringea. When the sea levels started to slowly rise some went west back to Siberia and others went East into N. America.

There really isnt anything about it thats even slightly dubious.

Speaking of which
this kinda deserve to be it's own thread, so someone can take charge and create it if they will , but this is interesting.
Native American Stone Tool Technology Found in Arabia
www.heritagedaily.com...

Coincidence??..the article suggests it maybe the case, but if not then like the big scary cats, Ppl might very well have backtracked to the old world.




posted on Aug, 12 2020 @ 08:46 AM
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a reply to: peter vlar
here are some interesting tidbits:
eurasian mammoth of the late pliestocene were descended from a North American population that crossed into Asia some 75kya, cheetahs are descended from north american cougars that migrated into eurasia then africa ~100kya and all extant cougar species are descended from a single surviving South American population after the rest went extinct 12,600 years ago.



posted on Aug, 12 2020 @ 09:48 AM
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originally posted by: Spider879

There really isnt anything about it thats even slightly dubious.

Speaking of which
this kinda deserve to be it's own thread, so someone can take charge and create it if they will , but this is interesting.
Native American Stone Tool Technology Found in Arabia
www.heritagedaily.com...

Coincidence??..the article suggests it maybe the case, but if not then like the big scary cats, Ppl might very well have backtracked to the old world.

I looked at the tools they use a similar style but they aren't twins of one another. Somebody in what is now Arabia - a master stone tool maker had an insight and created a new way (to him or her), to include a 'flute' making it easier to bind it to a shaft - speculation of course.



posted on Aug, 12 2020 @ 09:49 AM
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originally posted by: punkinworks10
a reply to: peter vlar
here are some interesting tidbits:
eurasian mammoth of the late pliestocene were descended from a North American population that crossed into Asia some 75kya, cheetahs are descended from north american cougars that migrated into eurasia then africa ~100kya and all extant cougar species are descended from a single surviving South American population after the rest went extinct 12,600 years ago.


Yes the first 'Columbian Exchange' as it were.



posted on Aug, 12 2020 @ 10:09 AM
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originally posted by: Xtrozero

originally posted by: LSU2018

No, when I say here, I mean on earth. And I think they were humans as well. But over a long period of time, they ended up basically where we're at today and we then eradicated outside of a few.


Evolution doesn't stop, humans today are not the humans 200k years ago or 200k in the future. Once you hit about a million+ years breeding is no longer capable, and would be called a different species. Go back a few million years and we talking something rather different than humans today.




It would depend on how civilization was destroyed as to whether or not things still stand. What would find if we dug into the ocean floor? Deep into the sand dunes throughout the deserts? How do we know Atlantis isn't a myth, and might be a city from a previous civilization? Most of civilization was wiped out in 40 day floods. And if you read the Bible, it tells of people who had life spans of hundreds of years before that event. Giants, people seen as gods, etc., all lead back to before the flood.


Maybe Atlantis was real and the height of technology for its time...which would be still 1000s of years from the tech we have today.

We can see in this chart when sea level were much lower and it is safe to assume there is a good amount of human history under water...What that means, who knows...as far as we know they were hunter gathers from about 15k and earlier.



As to giants I guess they are buried next to the unicorns... Personally I think there was a huge asteroid hit about 12800 years ago that came close to wiping most of the large animal life on the earth and was the bases for recordings like the great flood in the bible.

As to humans before that....I would say they were barely into farming and basic metals with still a lot of stone in use and there has been nothing to suggest otherwise.




Funny, I was finally catching up on Graham Hancock’s interview with Joe Rogan where he brought up the asteroid hitting 12,800 years ago and how he’s seen proof of it in select areas. I know the podcast with Randall Carlson and Hancock did a deep dive on that, but I haven’t seen it all yet.



posted on Aug, 12 2020 @ 04:53 PM
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a reply to: Drucifer

The impact theory took a rather major hit (get it?) recently.

"This work shows that the geochemical signature associated with the cooling event is not unique but occurred four times between 9,000 and 15,000 years ago," said Alan Brandon, Ph.D., professor of geosciences at University of Houston. "Thus, the trigger for this cooling event didn't come from space. Prior geochemical evidence for a large meteor exploding in the atmosphere instead reflects a period of major volcanic eruptions."


Kenneth Befus, Ph.D., volcanologist at Baylor University, added that "these signatures were likely the result of major eruptions across the Northern Hemisphere, including volcanoes in the Aleutians, Cascades and even Europe."

phys.org...
edit on 8/12/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2020 @ 06:10 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Drucifer

The impact theory took a rather major hit (get it?) recently.

"This work shows that the geochemical signature associated with the cooling event is not unique but occurred four times between 9,000 and 15,000 years ago," said Alan Brandon, Ph.D., professor of geosciences at University of Houston. "Thus, the trigger for this cooling event didn't come from space. Prior geochemical evidence for a large meteor exploding in the atmosphere instead reflects a period of major volcanic eruptions."


Kenneth Befus, Ph.D., volcanologist at Baylor University, added that "these signatures were likely the result of major eruptions across the Northern Hemisphere, including volcanoes in the Aleutians, Cascades and even Europe."

phys.org...


Uhhh, Yahh, Nope;

The first critique of the paper

youtu.be...
From the Youtube comments

Hello Dr. Sweatman, I appreciate your careful review of our recent work. This sort of thing is a very valuable public-facing service. Let me start by acknowledging that you rightly identify some weaknesses in our manuscript (e.g., error bars should be on all data always). We strive to do our best to avoid being "porky pies" with data, which is why the data is presented in the freely available supplemental. The connection to Younger Dryas makes the exciting headline in the present, but we want the data to be the aspect of the research that stands the test of time. The multiple Os horizons in Hall's Cave are the focus, and represent a fantastic new set of data. The Os seems best explained by large eruptions. Some of the PGE data is equivocal, as we discuss. Perhaps a lack of comet signature in Halls Cave doesn't preclude a comet elsewhere. Speaking on behalf of my coauthors, we consider this a beginning and not an end. There is a lot still to learn on this important and provocative topic!
Regards,
Kenny Befus

3


Prehistory Decoded
Prehistory Decoded
6 days ago
Thanks for contacting me Kenneth. So you're sticking to your guns? Despite admitting several weaknesses on Twitter? You're right, it is a complex area. A more carefully-worded refutation is now on my blog martinsweatman.blogspot.com. Please take a look.



Kenneth Befus
Kenneth Befus
6 days ago
​@Prehistory Decoded Science must welcome skepticism, and I welcome your well considered treatment in the video and blog. Many people on Twitter that value your work have interacted with me in a very positive way. I am thankful for that because online interactions are sometimes ugly. I remain confident that the multiple horizons in Hall's Cave are best explained by volcanic processes. As I'm the volcanologist of the coauthor group, I don't have much knowledge of comets. I've learned from this interaction. I do find it unlikely that each of the 5 Os spikes are comets, repeatedly being recorded over a few thousand years. A terrestrial process provides that sort of chemical effect and temporal rhythm in the form of large volcanic eruptions. As for Laacher See specifically for the YD.... the eruption certainly affected climate. Alone it was not enough. Volcanic eruptions on its scale cool climate for



posted on Aug, 12 2020 @ 06:13 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

Why a youtube link?

Are there any published criticisms available?



posted on Aug, 12 2020 @ 06:18 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: punkinworks10

Why a youtube link?

Are there any published criticisms available?


Preliminary paper, martinsweatman.blogspot.com...
I'm sure there will be a few rebuttals
One papere does not undo more than 100 peer reviewed and published works from dozens of institutions.

edit on p0000008k20832020Wed, 12 Aug 2020 18:20:19 -0500k by punkinworks10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2020 @ 06:20 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

Accusations of cherry picking should indeed be addressed. It is a highly technical field.

edit on 8/12/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)




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