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US states fight back against Purdue Pharma's bid to stop opioid lawsuits

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posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 02:17 PM
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a reply to: Edumakated

Those tests would be good, but my smoking thing was more about it being unfair for one to compare their ability to fight addiction with anothers.

As for the lawsuits, they're to prove just that.




posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 02:19 PM
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If you read the links i provided you would see where Pudue Pharma lied.

a reply to: Edumakated



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 02:22 PM
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a reply to: Puppylove

I think we're setting a bad precedent when we absolve ourselves of personal responsibility and perpetuate "victimhood".

This is a slippery slope, in my opinion.



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 02:29 PM
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originally posted by: Edumakated

originally posted by: CriticalStinker

originally posted by: Edumakated

originally posted by: lakenheath24
Im trying to find the Fed report...but they knew and allowed it.

www.nytimes.com...


And as I said earlier....the cdc will flame a field of veggies when one person gets ill...yet they look past 400,000 deaths.


Do we outlaw fast food because some people are obese? Should McDonald's be sued because some guy has a heart attack or high blood pressure?


No, but you also don't have doctors being paid by fast food companies to prescribe it to people who don't need it.

Some people don't have a clue about medicine, and there is a reason doctors have to go through so much schooling to get their licence. The cost and time of schooling is how they justify getting paid so handsomely (which I agree with should they do their job under the guidelines).

There is personal responsibility, and then their is hiring someone to best inform you on areas you're not a professional. And if someone knowingly uses their position to make money while harming you, in some fields that opens them up to civil and criminal cases.


Therefore, the problem lies with the prescribing doctors. Why aren't doctors being held to a higher standard? Why is it just the responsibility of the manufacturer?


Many doctors have been held accountable, and there are new oversights on prescribing controlled substances.

The question is did the manufacturer knowingly bribe doctors to over prescribe, and did they ship quantities to areas that greatly outnumber residents.

Did they knowingly break laws? If that can't be proven, so be it... If it can, hit them.



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 02:29 PM
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originally posted by: lakenheath24
Ahh. Aint read any links I see. That happens alot. No worries....lets look at Ohio. Estimates are 8 billion per year to fight this addiction.


www.ohioafp.org...

Not that you will edumacate yourself further...but lemme know. Will be happy to research a bit for ya.



..
a reply to: Edumakated



Detailed and logical analyses is clearly above your head. I pointed out to you earlier in the thread how some of the claims and studies were vague. Simply stating addiction cost Ohio $8 billion doesn't really answer or solve anything. People have been addicts long before Oxy came on the scene.

Look, no one is saying Purdue is innocent as white snow nor that the opioid crisis isn't a huge problem. However, in order to solve a problem, you must first correctly identify it, have a solid basis of data, and then come up with workable solutions.

Too many times we see hysterics and emotional responses to things.



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 02:33 PM
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Ffs....what do i look like...a goddamn 60minutes correspondant? Where in the eff would i get that kind of data? How bout YOU prove this all bunk instead?




a reply to: Edumakated



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 02:34 PM
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Yes....here. busted in 2007

www.ucsusa.org... op


a reply to: CriticalStinker



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 02:44 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

We also set a bad precedent if we allow ourselves to be abused, manipulated, taken advantage of and preyed upon by people who care more about profit than the ramifactions of their actions on society at large consistently and with no repercussions.

So sick of people getting away with actions that harm enough people to make all the serial killers death counts that ever lived combined look like a day in the park just because they're rich or in a position of power or influence.

A bad precedent has already been set and you're defending it.
edit on 10/9/2019 by Puppylove because: (no reason given)

edit on 10/9/2019 by Puppylove because: (no reason given)

edit on 10/9/2019 by Puppylove because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 02:49 PM
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originally posted by: lakenheath24
Ffs....what do i look like...a goddamn 60minutes correspondant? Where in the eff would i get that kind of data? How bout YOU prove this all bunk instead?




a reply to: Edumakated



So in other words, you just accept whatever propaganda you are given without first questioning it or asking more detailed questions.

Thanks for confirming...



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 03:10 PM
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No...your expectations are unreasonable considering the data YOU want. I provided many links, most of which are academic in nature. In fact....two posts above show the criminal acts perpetuated by the company. The only thing I have confirmed is that there is a massive problem going on.


a reply to: Edumakated



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 03:28 PM
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Another problem is this will cause drug prices to skyrocket again. A major problem with the oxycodone(generic oxycontin) crisis is the sharp increase of price, that will force addicts to choose heroin that is often contaminated fentynal which is a major cause of these overdoses. Restrict the supply when the demand is high, prices will increase, economics 101.

Unfortunately the policy makers do not look at this reality. About 15 years ago 30mg of oxycodone on the black market was about $10, less than an equivalent dose of heroin. Now the street value is about $40, far more expensive than heroin.

Opioid addiction causes major withdraws, people can not just quit without getting violently ill. Treatment options like suboxone are highly regulated too and can generally only be refilled once a month, if someone runs out early they will seek out drugs on the black market to deal withdraws.

Quitting completely, going through detox sounds great on paper, but the harsh reality is most will relapse. This is also another time when overdoses are high. Someone maybe clean for months or years then relapse then OD because their tolerance is not there, because of this I think long term suboxone treatment is a safer alternative.

The drug itself when used properly works great. Many people take it daily and can function because it does treat pain and with the proper dose does not make someone strung out where they can't function or work.

I feel these lawsuits are largely a major blame shift and money grab by ambulance chasing lawyers. The real issue is how to address addiction itself and not specifically opioid addiction.
edit on 9-10-2019 by jrod because: Xyz

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posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: jrod

I do agree monetary lawsuits aren't the answer. We need laws enacted to protect consumers from such predatory practices that lead to actual prison time and not just a couple years in a luxury prison. We're talking real hardcore prison.



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 03:50 PM
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Then why did Purdue Pharma lie about the addiction rate as i posted a couple threads above? And can you name another drug that has caused 400,000 deaths?

a reply to: jrod



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: lakenheath24

Some people just like the alure of wealth giving godlike power and fear the idea of anything that might limit the power of wealth. I swear there's a whole bunch of people with a secret wealth based power fantasy. Is why the wealthy get away with luxury prisons, fines than are pocket change for them, and corporate bailouts while the rest of us get fines that devestate us for years, harsh prison sentances that ruin our lives for minor infractions that barely harm a soul, and debt that can make us debt slaves for life.



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 04:03 PM
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Ergo the private, billionaire owners of Purdue trying to hide their money by decalring bankruptsy.


a reply to: Puppylove



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 04:26 PM
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Who has the deepest pockets...a reply to: Edumakated



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 04:31 PM
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You know what though I kind of see their point. I mean damn those poor greedy plebs who've had their lives ruined. How dare they try to gain compensation from the predatory monsters who've made a fortune off everyone elses misery. Who do they think they are? The greedy bastards. Those poor rich pill pushers deserve and earned every cent honestly and are beyond reproach.
edit on 10/9/2019 by Puppylove because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 05:24 PM
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a reply to: lakenheath24

It should be obvious to even the lay person and especially very well known by doctors that ALL opiods have a high addiction risk and cause withdraws. The claim that Purdue lied about this is a bit absurd in my opinion.

Opioid overdoses continue to go up, despite tighter regulations. This tells me there is a problem with the controls. I also feel the DEA has no business regulating how a good doctor treats their patients. I have heard many health care professionals express concern over this. Again, overdoses rates are not going down, which tells me the regulations that restrict a doctor to prescribe pain meds are not working.

That said, pill mills have been shut down in Florida. In the mid 2000s they were popping up everywhere and licensed doctors not acting in good faith would prescribe oxycodone like candy and this fueled the outbreak because most of those pills would end up on the black market. The DEA identifying and shutting down those kind of practices was a good thing. While it was obvious what many pill mills were doing and raiding them was good, there have been many smaller family doctors and walk in clinics that have been wrongly shut down also.



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 05:37 PM
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originally posted by: lakenheath24
Then why did Purdue Pharma lie about the addiction rate as i posted a couple threads above? And can you name another drug that has caused 400,000 deaths?

a reply to: jrod



Alcohol. Around 90,000 deaths per year and god knows how many throughout history. Millions upon millions I'm sure.

Whose fault is all the deaths caused by alcoholism?

I'm going to agree with DBCowboy on this one, god forgive me. At some point you blame the addicts. Imagine if the Feds decided to outlaw alcohol and bankrupt those producing it. No wait, that happened before. Worked out rather badly as I recall.



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 06:42 PM
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a reply to: lakenheath24

No doubt there was quite a bit of sketchiness on multiple fronts from Purdue to Pill Mills, however something in your touted "400,000 dead" statistic is that plenty of people decided to snort crushed up Oxy's instead of swallowing the pill as directed.

So DB is actually making a valid point with personal responsibility.
Oxy's are addictive even when used correctly. More so when used incorrectly. I can't see ANY Doctor, Pharmacist, or even Purdue endorsing this kind of usage so that leaves personal responsibility on the table.

Fentenayl patches are the same way, used to be the gel filled ones for addicts were a PITA to get a quick high off of.
So they switched to a different version and now it's F-addiction statistics off the charts. (unless I have that backwards an they took the gel form off the market?) Same principal tho.



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