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Is This The Huawei And The Chinese People’s Liberation Army Smoking Gun?

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posted on Jul, 6 2019 @ 01:45 PM
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I don't know why President Trump eased up on restrictions on telecom giant Huawei, especially when his administration previously stated that they represented a grave national security risk.

Article posted on July 2:


President Donald Trump promised to loosen trade restrictions on Huawei, while respecting national security concerns, but the details of the changes are still unclear.

LINK

Perhaps Trump will have a change of heart after recent facts have shown that, "Huawei staff had "worked as agents within China’s Ministry of State Security; worked on joint projects with the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA)."

Article posted yesterday, July 5:


According to the Henry Jackson Society researchers, the analysis of employee CVs—with as many as 25,000 uncovered by Fulbright University's Christopher Balding—showed that Huawei staff had "worked as agents within China’s Ministry of State Security; worked on joint projects with the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA); were educated at China’s leading military academy; and had been employed with a military unit linked to a cyber attack on U.S. corporations."

LINK

Article posted today, July 6:


Now, a "massive trove" of newly leaked records of Huawei employees appear to show "far closer links" between the private company and military-backed cyber agencies than previously known, according to The Telegraph. This follows on the heels of the discovery of academic research documents also confirming close cooperation between Huawei employees and the People's Liberation Army (PLA) uncovered by Bloomberg last month, as we previously reported. The new trove of employee CVs contains some 25,000 records analyzed by Fulbright University's Christopher Balding and UK-based Henry Jackson Society researchers (which, it should be noted, is a hugely controversial neocon think tank).

LINK


In the past, Huawei representatives have denied prior partnerships with the PLA and claimed that any past collaboration were not authorized. But now, these claims have been refuted with the release of these new records. I wonder what their response will be now?

Bloomberg article posted on June 26:


Huawei Personnel Worked With China’s Military on Research Projects



Huawei says research was not authorized by the company



“Huawei is not aware of its employees publishing research papers in their individual capacity,” spokesman Glenn Schloss said in a messaged statement. “Huawei does not have any R&D collaboration or partnerships with the PLA-affiliated institutions,” he said. “Huawei only develops and produces communications products that conform to civil standards worldwide, and does not customize R&D products for the military.”


So, is this just an imaginary threat that the United States shouldn't take seriously? Or, should we ban Huawei from being part of the U.S. communication infrastructure? Should we believe Huawei's chief legal officer Song Liuping, when he states, “There is no gun, no smoke. Only speculation.”


In 2016, Huawei helped a Chinese army hospital improve its IT infrastructure — an unobjectionable action but one that proves, once again, that Huawei misrepresented its relationship with the military. The source for this exclusive? A Chinese-language article on www.huawei.com. “There is no gun, no smoke. Only speculation,” Song said in May. When Huawei’s official website belies its representatives — some of whom, such as Song, had previously undisclosed links to the military — suspicion is justified. What else is Huawei hiding?

L INK


edit on 7/6/2019 by shawmanfromny because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 6 2019 @ 01:59 PM
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a reply to: shawmanfromny

To think that any Chinese company isn't beholden to the Government of China is total folly. They have a nationalized effort of industrial and Military espionage between them. Been doing it at least since Bill Clinton's Admin and probably since Nixon to some extent.



posted on Jul, 6 2019 @ 02:45 PM
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originally posted by: shawmanfromny
I don't know why President Trump eased up on restrictions on telecom giant Huawei, especially when his administration previously stated that they represented a grave national security risk.

If I'm not mistaken, he's only allowing them to buy American parts so it's just a little bit of easing. It's a wee morsel in the grand scheme of things of the trade war.



posted on Jul, 6 2019 @ 03:03 PM
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Federal agencies hace been buying and using Chinese made IT components for years. It's common knowledge that many (Most? All?) of those devices has spyware and backdoors written into their firmware.

If not common knowledge, I'd make sense to just assume it was there.

From the Washington Post
:
edit on 2019 7 06 by incoserv because: Fixed link.



posted on Jul, 6 2019 @ 03:51 PM
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a reply to: incoserv

I agree and wouldn't be surprised that America doesn't have spyware on components we manufacture and sell overseas.

If China discovered that we sold them something with spyware installed on it, I wouldn't blame them if they raised a stink and stopped buying from that particular manufacturer.

Likewise, It would be prudent for the U.S. to cancel any sale from an overseas manufacturer engaged in deceit, especially after such deceit has been exposed and written about in our media.



posted on Jul, 6 2019 @ 04:05 PM
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a reply to: shawmanfromny

I'd bet that the devices you and I are using to post these replies -
regardless of the country of origin - have backdoors built into them.
:


edit on 2019 7 06 by incoserv because: typo.



posted on Jul, 6 2019 @ 08:15 PM
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originally posted by: incoserv
Federal agencies hace been buying and using Chinese made IT components for years. It's common knowledge that many (Most? All?) of those devices has spyware and backdoors written into their firmware.

If not common knowledge, I'd make sense to just assume it was there.

From the Washington Post
:





Federal agencies hace been buying and using Chinese made IT components for years

No , no they have not.
UNLESS each individual component has been certified for use by the US Federal government
Most(if not all) Chinese components do not pass the certification , and they cannot use em.
Check CFIUS regulations.



posted on Jul, 7 2019 @ 07:05 AM
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a reply to: shawmanfromny

100% spot on. Huawei is a Chinese spy operation masquerading as a company.

In China you do not ever "leave" or "retire" from the government or military. You are always part of it until death.

An interesting question - Why does Huawei in the US have a SCIF (Secure Compartment Information Facility) in every office location?

No other companies do this.



posted on Jul, 7 2019 @ 10:16 PM
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So its OK that Apple and Google are basically tools of the CIA, no problems there, but the Chinese get in on the action with Huawei and all of a sudden the skies collapsing?

I would put money on every piece of tech we use having backdoors built in by its manufacturer regardless of where it came from.

Youre constantly being monitored, I find that offensive regardless of the nationality of the person whos doing the monitoring.

P.s to the CIA dude whos job it is to watch me, what do you do when I use incognito mode?
Do you just have to sit and stare at a blank screen and wait for me to turn it off or can you leave the computer to have a break and then get some sort of alert when Im back to normal browsing?



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