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Interstellar WARP Travel Via Element 115 - Spacetime Compression

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posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 03:48 PM
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hiddenremote.com...

while researching Bob Lazar, happened upon the above new article entitled:

EElement 115 could provide means for interstellar travel



Given that particle accelerators, particularly one in Russia, are working on harnessing the power of super heavy elements like 115, what happens when we gain access to these powers? End result, what is the consequence to opening portals that allow time and space to be warped?
Best Case
We end up at a lesser advanced culture and are mistaken for Gods.
Worst Case
We unleash Hell.


(why lesser? considering time in our matrix tends to be frozen - compressed - while we transverse large distances fast, in order for calculations to manifest and 'catch' up at our final destination in 'time' for our instantaneous-to-us arrival.)

anyways, Lazar gave us way more info decades ago, than what we are getting now from scientists, go figure! back in the 80s he reverse-engineered alien vessels at S4 (near A51) and that the 500lbs of extremely radioactive, superheavy stabilized element 115 fuel was used to power some sort of graviton warp drive that enabled craft to transverse spacetime via compression. only decades later, does science officially even acknowledge element 115 exists, and they stress its longest halflife is only 200 milliseconds; it is ironically similar atomic structure to extremely stable bismuth, but higher-energy, thus also called eka-bismuth.

somewhere in secret labs, scientists are messing with this new element and others to fuel weapons, spacecraft, timecraft, etc and their newest discoveries to be kept secret... indefinitely?

the truth is out there; just never a straight answer...





posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 03:53 PM
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a reply to: tulsi

Lazar is a phony.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:03 PM
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we're only in recent years 'discovering' the detailed elements he talked about in video interview decades ago:






so yea he 'must' have been faking it, ie 'phony'. (note - yt started silencing the audio when i try to watch these after the first one, hopefully it doesn't do same for y'all)



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:08 PM
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a reply to: tulsi

New elements are going to be discovered. I could make a video, talking about element 120, and 35 years from now it may be discovered.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:11 PM
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There are many threads on ATS discussing Bob Lazar and Element 115.
Just use the search function to look for them. But, if you don't want to look, here's one for you....

Massive thread started in 2007



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:15 PM
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and so Christopher Columbus discovered America;

making Cabot & Vikings and any others 'phonies' before him?



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:21 PM
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well ...element 115 seems to be stable… so….
edit on 1-7-2019 by ressiv because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:29 PM
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Thing is, if you start bending spacetime between Point A and Point B, what happens to all the stuff in-between those two points? Do they all get squished together? Pulled along for the ride? I imagine it would create huge ripples in the night sky that would be pretty obvious to anybody. Like you threw a rock into a pond.

And then what happens when you turn off your warp drive? Do things spring back to normal, or do they stay compressed because of the smaller distance / stronger pull of gravity?

And with gravity having such a long wavelength (hundreds or a thousand km), just how does one manipulate them using a waveguide on a relatively small ship?

More questions than answers, that's for sure.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:30 PM
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a reply to: tulsi

Any physicist, or anyone that understood the PTE knew 30 yrs ago that there was an open spot @115.

He recieved attention from the fringe only because of the context.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:41 PM
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People are still using the existence and discovery of Element 115 to discredit Lazar, which is insane.

They are saying "115 is too unstable in our environment to even exist here"

The people who say that missed their science classes in high school.

Every element is made up of protons, neutrons, and electrons. The different numbers of each, differentiate which element you are looking at.

115 is the atomic number, it refers to the number of protons in the atom.

Currently Element 115 is known now as Moscovium (Ununpentium)

Heres the catch:

Isotope - each of two or more forms of the same element that contain equal numbers of protons but different numbers of neutrons in their nuclei, and hence differ in relative atomic mass but not in chemical properties; in particular, a radioactive form of an element.

Each element on the chart, as we are taught, in its purest form has the same number of protons as it does neutrons.

This however isnt always the case. element s have different ISOTOPES, which are the same element, but the atoms have a different number of neutrons compared to their protons. Different isotopes of the same element can have different properties.

When you get to heavy elements, much like Bob Lazars "Element 115" (Moscovium) these atom become insanely complex with complex structures. Elements with this high of an atomic number (number of protons) are unstable and radioactive and dont last long because its hard keeping that many protons together in our environment here on earth, with our gravity and surrounding mass. (Inside of a super dense star or planet it may be a bit different)

The fact that we cant create or find any Element 115 that lasts more than a few seconds shouldn't be surprising. There are literally trillions of configurations that atom can have.

It only means we have yet to find the correct isotope in which the atom is stabilized and doesn't fall apart.

Theres no way to test Lazars statements on the 115 that we create, because they are a different isotope and have different properties.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:41 PM
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originally posted by: MachineMan
a reply to: tulsi

New elements are going to be discovered. I could make a video, talking about element 120, and 35 years from now it may be discovered.


Yeah, but can you remain consistent for 30 years if you were full of it?



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:43 PM
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originally posted by: ressiv
well ...element 115 seems to be stable… so….

Stable????

Its most stable isotope, moscovium-290, has a half life just over .5 seconds, and is not naturally occuring.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

There are plenty of people who have been full of sh*t their entire lives. He has a financial motive to lie.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:48 PM
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a reply to: Lucidparadox

There are no stable isotopes. That is why they dont occur naturally, exept possibly inside a black hole. Even then the likely would not last long, as electron "orbits" would contantly be shifting.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:49 PM
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Lazar is not a phony.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: Mach2




There are no stable isotopes.


Are you sure that's correct? I thought there were quite a few stable isotopes...



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:52 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler
Lazar is not a phony.


Well, i guess that settles that.

How could anyone disagree with that well thought out, lucid, on point arguement?



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 04:54 PM
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a reply to: Mach2

I disagree with your phrasing..

We have not discovered or created any stable isotopes.

That doesn't mean they don't exist or cant exist in our environment.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 05:00 PM
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originally posted by: Diaspar
a reply to: Mach2




There are no stable isotopes.


Are you sure that's correct? I thought there were quite a few stable isotopes...


There are a few definitions of "stable", none of which, to my knowledge apply to 115.

The most widely accepted is an element that is not subject to radioactive decay.

That is not to say that a radioactive element can not also have non radioactive isotopes, thereby having a stable isotope.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 05:05 PM
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originally posted by: Lucidparadox
a reply to: Mach2

I disagree with your phrasing..

We have not discovered or created any stable isotopes.

That doesn't mean they don't exist or cant exist in our environment.


When it comes to subatomic particle physics, I am no expert, so i would never say never, but there are rules governing the universe that have to do with weak and strong attractions that put the possibilities at a very very very unlikely level.



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