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I Need to Learn How to Predict Water Level in Rivers

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posted on Jun, 30 2019 @ 05:20 PM
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In my previous thread, I mentioned a place where I couldn't metal detect/treasure hunt because the level of waters in the river went up. I'd like to know if possible how to predict the level of the water in order to schedule next hunt in that spot.

I know you can check sea tides but rivers? Does it have to do with seasons or weather? Come on guys, give Trueman a hand. Plain English or maybe a website/app.

Thanks folks !




posted on Jun, 30 2019 @ 05:30 PM
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The USGS displays flow rates for all monitored streams/rivers... real time.

That's where I would start.

ETA: You can have notifications sent to your phone when the depth gauge hits certain levels...
edit on 30-6-2019 by madmac5150 because: Info to add



posted on Jun, 30 2019 @ 05:35 PM
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a reply to: Trueman

You could contact any local civil engineers or firms that provide water table studies.

Or the city planning department could put you in touch with their engineers, they are pretty much obligated to help you find information.

In my state, the army corps of engineers manage our lakes and dams. They regularly lower the water table when they are producing power. If you have something similar, they prob have a website with schedules and announcements.
edit on 30-6-2019 by Woodcarver because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2019 @ 06:05 PM
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originally posted by: Trueman
In my previous thread, I mentioned a place where I couldn't metal detect/treasure hunt because the level of waters in the river went up. I'd like to know if possible how to predict the level of the water in order to schedule next hunt in that spot.

I know you can check sea tides but rivers? Does it have to do with seasons or weather? Come on guys, give Trueman a hand. Plain English or maybe a website/app.

Thanks folks !



The two most important factors that would allow you to accurately predict water level in a river are:
1. Is the river managed (i.e, with dams and gates)? If the the answer is yes, then all you have to do is find the water release schedule (on the internet) of whichever agency is controlling the dam and they will tell you what the water level will be. Out here in the West, most rivers are controlled, and white water kayakers and rafters get ahold of the water release schedule so they can plan trips accurately.
2. Where is the river? What is its catch basin like? If a river is not dammed, its flow condition will be controlled by snowmelt and/or precipitation upstream. In the American Southwest, (Utah, for example) you can see really dramatic, sudden, and dangerous rises in water level in slot canyons whenever you get sudden rainstorms in the highlands in the catch basin upstream of the canyons. Usually it's in the summer monsoon season. The same thing happens in the Southeast, but the rivers tend to be flatter and drain larger areas, so it can take hours or days for the rain/melt surge to make it downstream. Check the current and forecast weather conditions upstream from where you plan to be.

One way or another, you have to arm yourself with a little information before you get to the river.



posted on Jun, 30 2019 @ 06:37 PM
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Thank you my friends. Now I know where to start😀👍



posted on Jun, 30 2019 @ 07:28 PM
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Or just wait for summer and a couple of months of no rain



posted on Jun, 30 2019 @ 07:37 PM
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Here is a good starting point for you , buddy.

water.weather.gov...





posted on Jun, 30 2019 @ 07:38 PM
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Where is your general area?




posted on Jun, 30 2019 @ 07:52 PM
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Give this a try. NOAA has a huge site, but, this will get you strted:

NOAA Rivers



posted on Jun, 30 2019 @ 08:17 PM
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Your county and state's Department of Natural Resources has the handle on this stuff. Give them a call; they will be able to provide you with their forecast info.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 02:03 AM
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a reply to: mikell

NJ-NY-PA



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 05:11 AM
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Lol. Get to know some of the old timers in the area. Time and observation is probably that best tools and someone who's live 50 or 60 years by a river (or mountain stream) has probably developed a sixth sense about such things.
But I am from upstate and know that they've been complaining about all the rain they've been getting. I've seen pictures of flooding in places I have never heard of flooding to that extent before.



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 08:02 AM
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I can. When it rains up north, it floods down south..



posted on Jul, 1 2019 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: Trueman

Go fishing!!

True, hands on experience on the local waterways!

It is a “feeling” based on a good guess. And sometimes you are wrong (remember that!). But understanding how water feeds into other water ways is all experience.

Same thing with gold prospecting, hunting, skiing/snowboarding, mountain biking, hiking, rock climbing,... you can’t watch some u-tube and be an expert. That kind of learning comes from doing... and often wrong!

Be patient (sp??), and don’t give up!!




posted on Jul, 2 2019 @ 06:49 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

You got to see those big fat fishes over there. Also crawfish. I think I'll wait for dry season to go there. I have so many other spots to go, I wish I could retire and do this all the time.




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