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Language learning for travel

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posted on May, 6 2019 @ 09:23 AM
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Howdy everyone!

My wife and I are planning to start traveling abroad. We intend to do 3 months at home, 3 months out of the country...rinse, repeat...
The 3 months home are spent wandering the U.S. in our motorhome. We sold our farm in October and have been traveling since then.
We are doing 3 month increments due to medical and family needs. Also, we are planning to extend to 6 month trips in the future.
Basically, we want to globetrot until we find where we want to retire.

For our first few trips we plan to visit Spanish speaking countries so we are trying to teach ourselves some Spanish. I understand there are several different dialects but we are only concerned in learning the rudimentary elements.

I have been using many language learning apps (free versions) trying to find the ones that work best for me. So far, Duolingo is the only one that I consistently use. Drops is a close second. I also use a flashcard app and traditional flashcards I got back in college and never used. I also follow some Spanish teachers on YouTube and i've tried watching Spanish Netflix shows. Also, I have been following several people on Twitter that post in Spanish. As I check my Twitter feed, I try to comprehend what the tweet says before I translate it.

First, what language learning apps do you recommend?
What additional resources could you recommend?
And lastly, would any native or fluent Spanish speakers on here be interested in possibly helping me along? Maybe as a penpal or on Skype?
We can talk conspiracies, politics, music...anything really.

I'm open to other languages as well. I'm just making Spanish a priority due to the numerous countries that speak it.


Thanks




posted on May, 6 2019 @ 09:42 AM
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a reply to: abago71




posted on May, 6 2019 @ 09:45 AM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

I have an old version of Rosetta Stone. I got it when I was in college along with the flash cards I mentioned.
I will try to dig it out and give it another try.



posted on May, 6 2019 @ 09:46 AM
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a reply to: abago71

Cool, you're in for a great adventure!

I always made it a point to learn a few words or more in the native tongue:
Hello/hi!
Good morning/afternoon/evening.
How are you? (and a polite answer)
I'm sorry, I don't speak any ______________.
Do you speak English?
Thank you.
Goodbye.

Chances are you will meet friends willing to communicate in any way it takes.
Have a great time!



posted on May, 6 2019 @ 09:51 AM
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a reply to: zosimov

Thanks for the tips.
Rudimentary conversational skills are my goal. I am not interested in fluency until we decide to stay somewhere for an extended time.
I do however, want to be able to show respect to each country we visit by showing that I am interested in both their country and culture by taking the time to communicate in THEIR language, not mine.



posted on May, 6 2019 @ 09:54 AM
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a reply to: abago71

Well that makes sense.
I'm sure that people will appreciate your efforts.


FYI: I did find lots of people wanting to practice English with me as I travelled.



posted on May, 6 2019 @ 10:09 AM
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Learn to understand English spoken by non-English speakers. That's my policy when my rudimentary German and French fail me.



posted on May, 6 2019 @ 10:35 AM
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Duolingo is my go to, currently learning Japanese through it. I've also bolstered that with both Genki books and their workbooks as well. There's another app, and this is just Japanese, called Dr Moku that seems pretty good as well. There are several services, for a price (around $50 an hour) for having a tutor for your language. This helps when you want to validate if you're able to at least be minimally conversant if you don't have access to someone who speaks the language locally.



posted on May, 6 2019 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: abago71

Get a tutor, or make online friends that can help

My German friend has given me some tips, I'll give it a shot...

'gutentarg, mein mutter die svinehuld! I'm pretty sure I just said 'good day, my mother the pig woman.'

Stick the antennae out and make acquaintances via the internet, some folk maybe able to help with the local dialect.

As the jawas say 'hooteedee!' which I believe is 'have fun on your holiday.'
edit on 6-5-2019 by Thecakeisalie because: (no reason given)


(post by rickymouse removed for political trolling and baiting)

posted on May, 6 2019 @ 02:07 PM
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If you are going to Spain itself be aware that Spanish aint the only language spoken there and while everyone speaks Spanish pretty much the locals can be a bit shirty sometimes especially in the tourist areas and play the dumb card.

And if you are in Greece then saying "oraya vija" will always go down well with the ladies


Best advice is to learn the names of the local firewater(s) where ever you go so you don't decide to strip the lining of your stomach thinking its just a glass of water



posted on May, 6 2019 @ 02:41 PM
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a reply to: abago71

Just fyi for emergencies.

If you find that you can't translate something, just use google translate, and
either show the person or text them.
I had to do that in a pinch and it worked well.

This sounds funny but the absolute best way to help learn a language is to start watching movies/shows in that language.
Often what is taught is way too proper and not how people actually speak. That is the hardest part of people learning English, we use so much slang and it varies by region.

Sounds like an amazing adventure is ahead!



posted on May, 6 2019 @ 03:08 PM
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a reply to: abago71

try listening to spanish radio,
spanish television
in some mexican restaurants, there are spanish newsletters available for free.



posted on May, 6 2019 @ 04:45 PM
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a reply to: Hypntick

I would consider a tutor but I am a cheapskate.



posted on May, 6 2019 @ 04:50 PM
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a reply to: subfab

I've been listening to a Spanish news channel on the radio.
I generally understand about 1/20th of what I hear but periodically I will get the gist of the message.



posted on May, 6 2019 @ 06:51 PM
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a reply to: abago71

you could start a "spanish language thread"
discuss anything conspiracy but in spanish.

a lot of google translate :-)



posted on May, 7 2019 @ 02:30 AM
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originally posted by: subfab
a reply to: abago71

try listening to spanish radio,
spanish television
in some mexican restaurants, there are spanish newsletters available for free.


This is a great idea. If you have Netflix there are plenty of Spanish language shows. La Casa de Papel is a good show. There are also Spanish newspapers like El Pais online.

buena suerte!



posted on May, 7 2019 @ 08:35 AM
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a reply to: subfab

Which forum would you suggest to create that in?



posted on May, 7 2019 @ 08:37 AM
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a reply to: NothingIsTrue

Every time I try to watch Spanish Netflix shows my wife and I eventually go into "MST 3000" mode and just start ad libbing our own narrative.




posted on May, 7 2019 @ 08:39 AM
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a reply to: abago71

Michel Thomas courses are fantastic!

It focuses more on conversational language rather than how they teach it in school. It takes a little bit to get used to but, I found the Spanish one pretty great. You actually learn along with two other people with no knowledge of the language.



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