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The first 60 years of the industrial revolution

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posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:27 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: toysforadults
oh look, nothing to do with the topic, gosh you guys are good at that


Sure it does, I'm waiting on your sour ass to become a subsistence farmer like the awesome serfs of yore. They had it so good? Then stop your grousing and farm some dirt.


I never actually said "they had it so good"

I simply said they worked less hours, unless of of course you can quote my comment on the rest of their life quality

funny how guys can make up so many things you think I've said while never actually addressing anything I've actually said. that's the fruit of your smug attitudes




posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:27 PM
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originally posted by: tovenar
That's why wars were only fought in the summer-- that's when the pawns (baurer/farmer in German chess-playing!) were free to fight the kings wars.


The Romans pretty much put and end to that in the 2nd Century BC when they made standing Legions operate year round.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:28 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
...on the rest of their life quality


I'm sure they had a sooper awesome quality of life, all 25 years of it.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:31 PM
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a reply to: tovenar

great post, thanks for actually adding something worth reading
edit on 15-7-2018 by toysforadults because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:32 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: toysforadults
...on the rest of their life quality


I'm sure they had a sooper awesome quality of life, all 25 years of it.


actually life expectancy for hunter gatherers was about 70 years. (as it says in the Psalms: "The years of a man are threescore and ten, or by dint of strength, fourscore".)

That crap about booming life expectancy comes from the films they made you watch in school, and are all about gains made since 1800, coming out of the forage revolution....



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:33 PM
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a reply to: tovenar


You kinda lost me when you use the Bible as a history book. Hell, it never even crossed 40 until the 20th Century.








edit on 15-7-2018 by AugustusMasonicus because: Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:33 PM
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a reply to: tovenar

you didn't lose me, great info



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:36 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: tovenar
That's why wars were only fought in the summer-- that's when the pawns (baurer/farmer in German chess-playing!) were free to fight the kings wars.


The Romans pretty much put and end to that in the 2nd Century BC when they made standing Legions operate year round.


Look at Ceasar's "Gallic Wars". They camped in a castrum for the winter. Vercingetorix' uprising began in the winter, and Caesar's legions in Helvietia (Switzerland/SE France) would not leave the forts to provide relief until Caesar came and led them personally. Legionnaires were foot-soldiers, but they had to personally haul their goods, because the horses couldn't be fed in a baggage train through the winter. Caesar talks about the men carrying sacks of grain on their backs, because horses couldn't make the journey....



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:37 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: tovenar


You kinda lost me when you use the Bible as a history book. Hell, it never even crossed 40 until the 20th Century.




whether the stories in it or true or not, it shows a worldview where 70 was considered a "natural" age....

Even myths can tell you facts about the time then. like Homer's "Iliad." which also shows people living to 70...

EDIT TO ADD:

it didn't cross forty in AFRICA until the twentieth century. Because Africa was being used as a mercantilist factory farm by GB and France in the 19th century....





edit on 15-7-2018 by tovenar because: (no reason given)

edit on 15-7-2018 by tovenar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:39 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

revealedrome.com...



Major misconception #1: Ancient Romans had very short lives, and if you made it to 35, you were old I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard this: “The life expectancy of the average Roman was 35.” What people, including many tour guides, usually draw from this is that 30- and 40-something Romans must have been very venerable indeed. Here’s the problem. Aside from the fact that the data is terrible, this 35-year life expectancy is the average. Meaning it factors in the ancient world’s very high child mortality rate: Up to half of all Roman kids died before the age of 10. If you did reach 10, you could expect to live into your 40s or 50s, at least. Then there’s all the Roman men who died in military service… and the women who died in childbirth.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:43 PM
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a reply to: tovenar


What are you talking about? Caesar arrived back in Gaul in the winter and force-marched eight of his legions in the winter to pursue the Gauls. He also razed and seized towns during this time. Mabye if you actually read up on the history you'd know this.

It's in the Commentary, 7.10-12.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:45 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults


Oh, geez, died in childbirth, just like I said. Thanks for the data.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:46 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: Lumenari
prior to the industrial age people worked far less hours at their own leisure.


They also lived to the ripe old age of 'died in childbirth'.

Hey, if someone wants to be a dirt farmer like the olden days they could just go do it and show the rest of us debt slaves how it's done.



Women, expected to bear between five and 10 live children, could anticipate a dozen pregnancies. Bodies wore out fast, and women aged rapidly. With infant mortality high, families typically did not name a child until he or she had reached the age of two: prior to that time, parents would call the baby “it,” “the little angel,” or “the little visitor.” Overall life expectancy hardly tells the tale of the everyday life, where work was hard, the most minor sicknesses potentially life-threatening, and pleasures few.


Ah yes... the good old days!



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:47 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

blog.english-heritage.org.uk...

amazing, they had underfloor heating, guess it wasn't really that bad for some people huh?



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:47 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

revealedrome.com...



Major misconception #1: Ancient Romans had very short lives, and if you made it to 35, you were old I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard this: “The life expectancy of the average Roman was 35.” What people, including many tour guides, usually draw from this is that 30- and 40-something Romans must have been very venerable indeed. Here’s the problem. Aside from the fact that the data is terrible, this 35-year life expectancy is the average. Meaning it factors in the ancient world’s very high child mortality rate: Up to half of all Roman kids died before the age of 10. If you did reach 10, you could expect to live into your 40s or 50s, at least. Then there’s all the Roman men who died in military service… and the women who died in childbirth.


And Rome was caught up in the wheat-as-food-supply doctrine of the agricultural revolution. Which again proves my point.

Look at the lifespans of nomads, and you'll see something entirely different.


Chief Joseph (Nez Perces) lived to be 64.
Big Eagle of the Sioux lived to be 79
Black Elk (Blackfoot) lived to be 87.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:49 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
amazing, they had underfloor heating, guess it wasn't really that bad for some people huh?


They also had indoor plumbing, not really seeing how this changes the life expectancy average. Maybe you can bust out a Bible quote too.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:52 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

maybe I can use clever hyperbole



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:53 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults


Doubtful.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:54 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

lol... how about rather than making rude comments you actually show us some data?



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