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The first 60 years of the industrial revolution

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posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 04:44 PM
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Living conditions in the first 60 years of the industrial revolution:

webs.bcp.org...


Working in new industrial cities had an effect on people’s lives outside of the factories as well. As workers migrated from the country to the city, their lives and the lives of their families were utterly and permanently transformed.

For many skilled workers, the quality of life decreased a great deal in the first 60 years of the Industrial Revolution. Skilled weavers, for example, lived well in pre-industrial society as a kind of middle class. They tended their own gardens, worked on textiles in their homes or small shops, and raised farm animals. They were their own bosses. One contemporary observer noted, “their dwelling and small gardens clean and neat, —all the family well clad, —the men with each a watch in their pocket, and the women dressed in their own fancy, —the Church crowded to excess every Sunday, —every house well furnished with a clock in elegant mahogany or fancy case. . . . Their little cottages seemed happy and contented. . . . it was seldom that a weaver appealed to the parish for a relief. . . . peace and content sat upon the weaver’s brow” (Thompson 269). But, after the Industrial Revolution, the living conditions for skilled weavers significantly deteriorated. They could no longer live at their own pace or supplement their income with gardening, spinning, or communal harvesting. For skilled workers, quality of life took a sharp downturn: “A quarter [neighborhood] once remarkable for its neatness and order; I remembered their whitewashed houses, and their little flower gardens, and the decent appearance they made with their families at markets, or at public worship. These houses were now a mass of filth and misery“ (269).

In the first sixty years or so of the Industrial Revolution, working-class people had little time or opportunity for recreation. Workers spent all the light of day at work and came home with little energy, space, or light to play sports or games. The new industrial pace and factory system were at odds with the old traditional festivals which dotted the village holiday calendar. Plus, local governments actively sought to ban traditional festivals in the cities. In the new working-class neighborhoods, people did not share the same traditional sense of a village community. Owners fined workers who left their jobs to return to their villages for festivals because they interrupted the efficient flow of work at the factories (Stearns 73-74). After the 1850s, however, recreation improved along with the rise of an emerging the middle class. Music halls sprouted up in big cities. Sports such as rugby and cricket became popular. Football became a professional sport in 1885. By the end of the 19th century, cities had become the places with opportunities for sport and entertainment that they are today (Hobsbawm, Industry and Empire 164).

During the first 60 years of the Industrial Revoltuion, living conditions were, by far, worst for the poorest of the poor. In desperation, many turned to the “poorhouses” set up by the government. The Poor Law of 1834 created workhouses for the destitute. Poorhouses were designed to be deliberately harsh places to discourage people from staying on “relief” (government food aid). Families, including husbands and wives, were separated upon entering the grounds. They were confined each day as inmates in a prison and worked every day. One assistant commissioner of the workhouses commented, “Our intention is to make the workhouses as much like prisons as possible.” Another said, “Our object is to establish a discipline so severe and repulsive as to make them a terror to the poor and prevent them from entering” (Thompson 267). Yet, despite these very harsh conditions, workhouse inmates increased from 78,536 in 1838 to 197,179 in 1843 (268). This increase can only be viewed as a sign of desperation amongst the poorest of the poor.


The above is a description of the first 60 years of the industrial revolution. It was a tumultuous time for the world and especially harsh for the worlds pore.

Clearly we are entering a similarly tumultuous time and just like the industrial revolution its likely we will emerge better for it ... but what of the first "60" years?

Who will be the skilled workers who's quality of life will decrease? Will they easily accept this lot in life or will our ever increasing idea of social justice make for even more turbulence through the transition?


Who will be the families that are separated upon entering the powerhouses; confined each day as inmates in a prison and worked every day?




posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 04:47 PM
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The industrial age enslaved all of us to insane system where we all work ourselves to death so a handful of people can live in opulence.

prior to the industrial age people worked far less hours at their own leisure

our lives today are a joke, we spend our entire lives working for others to prosper and we're told we should be sooo happy about it, how great it is and this and that, such bs
edit on 15-7-2018 by toysforadults because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 05:13 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
The industrial age enslaved all of us to insane system where we all work ourselves to death so a handful of people can live in opulence.

prior to the industrial age people worked far less hours at their own leisure

our lives today are a joke, we spend our entire lives working for others to prosper and we're told we should be sooo happy about it, how great it is and this and that, such bs


Maybe we do;

But let's not pretend the industrial revolution enslaved all of us to an insane system where we all work ourselves to death so a handful of people can live in opulence... that's been reality for a lot longer than that.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 05:26 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
The industrial age enslaved all of us to insane system where we all work ourselves to death so a handful of people can live in opulence.

prior to the industrial age people worked far less hours at their own leisure

our lives today are a joke, we spend our entire lives working for others to prosper and we're told we should be sooo happy about it, how great it is and this and that, such bs


Quoted for insanity.

The majority of people prior to the industrial age worked sunup to sundown just to survive.

Tell a rancher or farmer how good they had it, just working at their leisure... LOL

As for our lives today, I certainly have a big bunch of time to do whatever I want and enough money to do that.

As a blue collar worker.

Perhaps it is your life that is a joke and you need to make a better one.

An observation, as always.




posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 05:49 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

have a source for that?

also, I would like to point out that people of lesser intelligence tend to boil everything down to personal experience and their views of the individual rather than their view on the topic

edit on 15-7-2018 by toysforadults because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 05:59 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

MIT.edu



One of capitalism's most durable myths is that it has reduced human toil. This myth is typically defended by a comparison of the modern forty-hour week with its seventy- or eighty-hour counterpart in the nineteenth century. The implicit -- but rarely articulated -- assumption is that the eighty-hour standard has prevailed for centuries. The comparison conjures up the dreary life of medieval peasants, toiling steadily from dawn to dusk.


I added a highlight for emphasis.


Before capitalism, most people did not work very long hours at all. The tempo of life was slow, even leisurely; the pace of work relaxed.


will you look at that...


When capitalism raised their incomes, it also took away their time.


amazing....


It stretched from dawn to dusk (sixteen hours in summer and eight in winter), but, as the Bishop Pilkington has noted, work was intermittent - called to a halt for breakfast, lunch, the customary afternoon nap, and dinner. Depending on time and place, there were also midmorning and midafternoon refreshment breaks.


wow... so even in times where they worked longer hours they had better working conditions (probably not everyone)...


These rest periods were the traditional rights of laborers, which they enjoyed even during peak harvest times. During slack periods, which accounted for a large part of the year, adherence to regular working hours was not usual.


must have been nice huh...



An important piece of evidence on the working day is that it was very unusual for servile laborers to be required to work a whole day for a lord. One day's work was considered half a day, and if a serf worked an entire day, this was counted as two "days-works."



The contrast between capitalist and precapitalist work patterns is most striking in respect to the working year. The medieval calendar was filled with holidays. Official -- that is, church -- holidays included not only long "vacations" at Christmas, Easter, and midsummer but also numerous saints' andrest days. These were spent both in sober churchgoing and in feasting, drinking and merrymaking. In addition to official celebrations, there were often weeks' worth of ales -- to mark important life events (bride ales or wake ales) as well as less momentous occasions (scot ale, lamb ale, and hock ale). All told, holiday leisure time in medieval England took up probably about one-third of the year.


ah well, don't want to break down your brain washing or anything, WORK HARDER SLAVE



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults

Marx agrees with you:



The proponents of laissez-faire capitalism have absolute zero compassion for their fellow man. Let's pretend their's virtue is selfishness.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:11 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
a reply to: Lumenari

have a source for that?

also, I would like to point out that people of lesser intelligence tend to boil everything down to personal experience and their views of the individual rather than their view on the topic


The source is history? You have a brain and an internet connection... care to use it to look up fun facts like the life expectancy of people pre-industrial, read up on what it took to survive in 1760?

I would like to point out that people of lesser intelligence generally have crappy jobs and bitch about it all day long because it is always everyone else's fault.




posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:13 PM
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originally posted by: dfnj2015
a reply to: toysforadults

Marx agrees with you:



The proponents of laissez-faire capitalism have absolute zero compassion for their fellow man. Let's pretend their's virtue is selfishness.


Marx never figured out how his model would actually be sustainable.

Neither has anyone else. Ever.

It is an awesome concept, if you just take out human nature.

I'm always amazed that there are still people who think it a good idea.

Takes all kinds...



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:13 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults

It's doesn't matter how long you work. It doesn't matter how much you get paid. It doesn't matter how much you pay in taxes. WHAT DOES MATTER is the purchasing power of your take home pay. And if you go by the Federal Reserve's own data the American people are getting screwed up the butt REAL hard:

www.quandl.com...



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults

Turn off your lights, turn off your water, turn off your phone.

Come back in three months and tell me how wonderful it was to be self-sufficient while working at your leisure.

Until then you are just spouting off socialist crap.


edit on 15-7-2018 by Lumenari because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari




The source is history? You have a brain and an internet connection... care to use it to look up fun facts like the life expectancy of people pre-industrial, read up on what it took to survive in 1760?


I post info for you (hint: I already knew it before I made my statement)




I would like to point out that people of lesser intelligence generally have crappy jobs and bitch about it all day long because it is always everyone else's fault.


this is a discussion forum where people come to discuss ideas, I personally discuss a wide range of topics of interests and the economy happens to be one of those interests (I watch the market closely)

so far in your personal attacks you're about 0-5 or so and with your attacks on my perspective your also about 0-5

maybe you should read more and personally attack people less



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:17 PM
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originally posted by: Lumenari
a reply to: toysforadults

Turn off your lights, turn off your water, turn off your phone.

Come back in three months and tell me how wonderful it was to be self-sufficient while working at your leisure.

Until then you are just spouting off socialist crap.



I've made zero references to socialism I've only attacked the ideas of today, this is more nonsense from you having nothing to do with what I've said and having more to do with the strawman you've built for me in your head

you're making a nonsensical argument when the topic in the OP is about working hours/ conditions which I've relevantly discussed and made assertions which I've backed with evidence.

you have not backed anything you've said, maybe you should read more and attack less



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:19 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults

I had forgotten about you and basic economics.

I will leave you at that... this "slave" is in the middle of 10 days off because we are bouncing kitchen ideas off of a designer for the new house we're building.

So I'm off to that horrible place where people work... you continue on this thread and have fun!




posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:20 PM
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originally posted by: dfnj2015
a reply to: toysforadults

It's doesn't matter how long you work. It doesn't matter how much you get paid. It doesn't matter how much you pay in taxes. WHAT DOES MATTER is the purchasing power of your take home pay. And if you go by the Federal Reserve's own data the American people are getting screwed up the butt REAL hard:

www.quandl.com...


I'm well aware of that I've crunched the numbers 1000 times. I'm also not an advocate for anything but a voluntary system



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:21 PM
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originally posted by: Lumenari
prior to the industrial age people worked far less hours at their own leisure.


They also lived to the ripe old age of 'died in childbirth'.

Hey, if someone wants to be a dirt farmer like the olden days they could just go do it and show the rest of us debt slaves how it's done.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:21 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari




I had forgotten about you and basic economics.


you've actually never said anything outside of personal attacks and never verified your point of view with any sort of evidence whereas I always back my assertions with evidence

actual data and numbers

I think you are now 0-6 on both accounts, I'll continue to keep track until you get tired of losing
#MAGA
edit on 15-7-2018 by toysforadults because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:23 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

oh look, nothing to do with the topic, gosh you guys are good at that

god forbid you actually use evidence and discuss the topic, I would actually be impressed



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:24 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
oh look, nothing to do with the topic, gosh you guys are good at that


Sure it does, I'm waiting on your sour ass to become a subsistence farmer like the awesome serfs of yore. They had it so good? Then stop your grousing and farm some dirt.



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 06:25 PM
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Actually, the various technology revolutions all been a huge mistake from the average human's point of view.

First was the Agricultural revolution, starting in 8000 BC.

Life expectancy plummeted in every society that started farming (Olmec, Sumer, Egypt, Yellow River). People switched from a seasonally varied diet rich in animal protein to a monotonous diet of a single grain (rice in china, wheat in Egypt and Sumer, maize in Mexico, potato in South America). Storing starch caused the domestication of the rat, which has plagued civilized people ever since. (nomads didn't have to deal with mice). This brought most of the plagues that have... plagued us ever since.

Even with that, most humans were farmers. And farmers get the "summer off." Basically they close the gates on their crop, and pray for rain right up to harvest. Other than tending livestock and preparing for harvest, farmers actually had a great deal of leisure time until the September wheat harvest in Europe, or the October corn harvest in Mexico. That's why wars were only fought in the summer-- that's when the pawns (baurer/farmer in German chess-playing!) were free to fight the kings wars.

Then the forage revolution. 1500-1800 AD.

Domesticating first oats, then alfalfa and the turnip/wurzel, allowed the over-wintering of horses. They were used not only as draft animals, but primarily for cavalry units in the age of mounted warfare. along with the introduction of the stirrup, Kings now had the ability to create true nation-states, with shock military units that could be used anywhere in the kingdom to enforce the king's will. So with the rise of standing armies, farmers were pressured to grow cash crops instead of food for their own families and livestock. This made the farm families dependent on the market for their livelihood, and for their food supply. It also made it possible to tax the farmer for his toil; something that had been impossible when the family ate the "fruit of their labor" before the tax man could inventory it all. Most importantly, armies could fight year round. This revolution culminated in the "total war", and is why Napoleon could seriously contemplate winter offensives in Europe: his horses had food through the winter...

Then the industrial revolution, 1700 +

When a worker didn't need skill, just the ability to perform one repetitive act over and over for a whole shift (this is when shift work was invented, and we became a truly 24-hour society). Children could do the work of pumping a bellows or threading a loom or lighting blasting powder in the mines. So they made all work child's work, and the pay followed the kids down. The work was hazardous (unlike traditional farming), it was non-stop, and it was completely dehumanizing. People had gone from tending animals to tending machines....

Then comes the technology revolution, 1940+

And humans are degraded one more step, as what was previously done by humans for slave wages becomes automated/robotized. Fewer humans are needed to tend the machines, and people are only worth their ability to consume goods and services, providing a market for the products of the computer.

Once human work becomes redundant, humans will be redundant. It will only make sense for the robots to remove the source of all the uncertainty, the humans...




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