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Chinese Satellite Captures a Cool View of Earth from Lunar Orbit

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posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 04:35 AM
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originally posted by: BotheLumberJack
a reply to: RowanBean

Must you post your food, this is a Satellite thread.

Can't I turn it into a Spaceballs thread?




posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:12 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Xcathdra


How the hell are the craters on the moon relatively close in depth
Can you define "relatively close?"

But have you considered that a really large impact will cause the crust to liquify?


Even if the planet/body is not geologically active it will still liquefy? I am not real versed in this area so its a serious question. To answer your question it just seems, from photos, that there are massive craters and small craters but they appear to have shallow depth. I would think some of the craters we can see should be a lot deeper given the size of the impact.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:15 AM
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originally posted by: Plotus
Why no stars ?



EXPOSURE it's that simple, expose for the Earth NO stars expose for the stars and the EARTH turns into an over exposed blob.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:18 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

Even if the planet/body is not geologically active it will still liquefy?

E=1/2MV^2. Yes.


To answer your question it just seems, from photos, that there are massive craters and small craters but they appear to have shallow depth.
That's an oft repeated objection but 2 dimensional views can be deceptive.

fisherka.csolutionshosting.net...



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:21 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Cool thanks



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:26 AM
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originally posted by: ZombieZygote

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: ZombieZygote

Oh my.

Now what?


Now what? You never explained the absurd size of North America in that "satellite" picture, compared to the other, much smaller pictures of North America. But..... Science...... Right?


Hey dunder head go and read up on photography and the effects of FOCAL length and how objects appear.





So do you think the church lifted itself off its' foundations and moved closer to the statue.

Or How about this





When white can look black due to exposure, if you don't know how something works ask then you won't look as stupid



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:40 AM
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This is for the people on here that don't understand exposure the link below is a timelapse of around 260,000 pictures called Purley Pacific Nortwest. The exposures are are the 30 second mark for the night shots at about 3:27 you will see the Milky Way and the Moon in the same sky look at how the Moon looks because the exposure is set to show the stars.

Watch on the biggest screen possible and enjoy


vimeo.com...



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:48 AM
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originally posted by: leopayaso1987
I wonder when when will we have a NON INTERRUPTED live 24h stream of the Earth from the Moon. Still don’t understand why it hasn’t been done yet,I mean...


Will this do for you


Himawari-8 is a Japanese weather satellite. It’s in geostationary orbit over about 141° (near New Guinea), and has been operational since 2015-07-07. It’s noteworthy in many ways, but what’s cool here is that it produces full-disk, true-color images every 10 minutes.


HIMAWARI8



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 08:37 AM
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a reply to: wmd_2008

Whoa! I didn't even know about the Himawari one. I like how we can click on the timeline to see the Earth at a specific time.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 10:09 AM
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a reply to: wmd_2008

Coooool

But that is just out there to confuse us, obviously.

/Sarcasm



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 11:19 AM
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And of course let's not forget NASA''s discover probe

epic.gsfc.nasa.gov...

But obviously boo, NASA, bad guys etc etc



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 01:13 PM
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...and while we're on the subject, here's that probe's view of Earth on the same day as China's picture.




posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:03 PM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

I watched that video and you know whats hilarious?

The japanese purposely cut out the part that shows the american flag and landing site. lol



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:31 PM
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originally posted by: scraedtosleep
The japanese purposely cut out the part that shows the american flag and landing site. lol

Eh. America is old and busted. Japan is the new hotness.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 05:34 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Until all that radiation catches up with them and cancer becomes the number one way to die. 8(


#fukushima



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 06:16 PM
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originally posted by: scraedtosleep
Until all that radiation catches up with them and cancer becomes the number one way to die. 8(

Oh, our delicious American cigarettes are already taking care of that.



posted on Jun, 20 2018 @ 02:35 AM
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originally posted by: Xcathdra

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Xcathdra


How the hell are the craters on the moon relatively close in depth
Can you define "relatively close?"

But have you considered that a really large impact will cause the crust to liquify?


Even if the planet/body is not geologically active it will still liquefy? I am not real versed in this area so its a serious question. To answer your question it just seems, from photos, that there are massive craters and small craters but they appear to have shallow depth. I would think some of the craters we can see should be a lot deeper given the size of the impact.

Mon impacts release so much energy (on the order of many magnitudes of an H-bomb) that the rock indeed liquifies. A lot of ejecta falls back into the crater, which is what forms a relatively shallow crater floor with a central peak in the middle. Portions of crater walls also collapse into the crater. Over time, erosion makes the crater shallowe and less-defined.

Here's an animation showing the general process:

www.youtube.com...

Consider, for example, Aristarchus crater. It's fairly fresh, and thus quite deep despite not being gigantic in diameter: lroc.sese.asu.edu...



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