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Chinese Satellite Captures a Cool View of Earth from Lunar Orbit

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posted on Jun, 18 2018 @ 04:15 PM
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How does this fit with the University of Utah study that proves Kansas is flatter then a pancake? If the earth is round as it obviously it is, wouldn't every inch of the globe be part of the curve? And if one part of the globe is flat wouldn't the curve have to make up for it somewhere else by being more bulky in areas?

University of Utah proves Kansas is flatter then a Pancake




posted on Jun, 18 2018 @ 04:25 PM
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a reply to: PaladinRoden

Assuming you're not kidding: did you miss this?

For example, the earth is slightly flattened at the poles due to the earth’s rotation, making its semi-major axis slightly longer than its semi-minor axis, giving a global f of 0.00335. For both Kansas and the pancake, we approximated the local ellipsoid with a second-order polynomial line fit to the cross-sections. These polynomial equations allowed us to estimate the local ellipsoid’s semi-major and semi-minor axes and thus we can calculate the flattening measure f.


They allowed for the local ellipsoid. What they were measuring was the "bumpiness" of Kansas in comparison to the bumpiness of pancake.



“The pancake measured in the article was 130 millimeters, and its surface relief was 2 millimeters. Apply that ratio to the east-west dimension of Kansas, approximately 644 kilometers, and the state would need a mountain (2/130 x 664,000 meters) 9,908 meters tall in order not to be flatter than a pancake. Since the highest mountain in the world is 8,848 meters tall, every state in the U.S. is flatter than a pancake.”
mentalfloss.com...



edit on 6/18/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2018 @ 05:40 PM
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a reply to: Phage

there is no space and the earth is flat.....

jesz get with the science



(ignore the vaccine stuff, it was the first pic that kinda made sense in my search)
edit on 18-6-2018 by penroc3 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 01:00 AM
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a reply to: leopayaso1987

We get that from the iss. But your right I also would like a stream from the moon. It can't be live though because of the speed of light. It will always be 1 and a half seconds behind.

www.ustream.tv...




posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 03:02 AM
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originally posted by: scraedtosleep
a reply to: leopayaso1987
But your right I also would like a stream from the moon.

And what would that show, apart from the very static-looking lunar surface? Even the day-night cycle on the Moon takes about 28 days as opposed to 24hrs on Earth. You might as well be looking at a still photo taken on the Moon.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 03:03 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Conversely, I can actually watch the grass grow on my lawn.

Make it stop! Please.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 03:08 AM
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originally posted by: satellite1
Are there any pics of Earth from anytime with stars? Would seem weird that we can achieve this with another planet but our own.

From the ISS:







And they filmed some amazing timelapse videos:


www.youtube.com...



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 03:47 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

From orbit around the moon?

Looking both ways.
edit on 19-6-2018 by scraedtosleep because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 04:05 AM
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a reply to: scraedtosleep

I think people were assuming a camera based on the surface.

In a sense the Japanese have done what you suggest there



But without any change in atmosphere and weather patterns, there's not much to see once you've seen it. Just put that youtube vid on a loop on your big screen TV



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 04:20 AM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

Erosion on the Moon is slow.

Really, really, really slow. But every once in a while something happens, so you never know.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 04:23 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

Erosion on the Moon is slow.

Really, really, really slow. But every once in a while something happens, so you never know.

Except for those rare transient lunar phenomena.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 04:23 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Maybe you can answer this. How the hell are the craters on the moon relatively close in depth while having a massive difference in radius?

Given other bodys in our solar system the moon seems to be the oddball with that one.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 04:26 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra


How the hell are the craters on the moon relatively close in depth
Can you define "relatively close?"

But have you considered that a really large impact will cause the crust to liquify?



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 04:27 AM
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originally posted by: Xcathdra
a reply to: Phage

Maybe you can answer this. How the hell are the craters on the moon relatively close in depth while having a massive difference in radius?

Given other bodys in our solar system the moon seems to be the oddball with that one.

Maybe you're right.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 04:28 AM
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a reply to: RowanBean

Looking at Io creeps me out. It's icky.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 04:31 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: RowanBean

Looking at Io creeps me out. It's icky.

This is what creeps me out.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 04:32 AM
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a reply to: RowanBean

Damn that's creepy what is it?



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 04:32 AM
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a reply to: BotheLumberJack

Io's brother. Bill.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 04:33 AM
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a reply to: RowanBean

Must you post your food, this is a Satellite thread.



posted on Jun, 19 2018 @ 04:34 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Crikey!




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